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Jun 13

Does Masturbation Decrease Testosterone? Here’s What Sexual Health Experts Say – The Healthy

Testosterone is the key hormone responsible for developing male sex characteristics, such as facial hair and a deeper voice, and it plays a pivotal role in muscle mass and sexual function in both men and women.

Over the past few decades, research has shown a subtle yet steady decline in testosterone levels among men, a trend documented since the 1980s and highlighted by a 2021 study in the peer-reviewed journal European Urology Focus. This study, which analyzed testosterone levels in adolescent and young adult men from a U.S. national database, revealed a consistent drop in average total testosterone over the past 20 yearsa decline that correlates with rising body mass index. Despite this trend, testosterone levels have not yet dipped to clinically low ranges across the population, but they are inching closer to that point each year.

So, whats driving this downward trend? While some factors are beyond individual control, lifestyle choices significantly contribute. Conditions like diabetes and obesity are closely linked to lower testosterone levels. Data show that another increasingly common concern seems to be whether sexual activities like masturbation and ejaculation decrease testosterone levels and lead to hormonal imbalances in males. In short, research in this area does not support the idea that these activities impact testosterone levels over the longterm.

Keep reading for more, as researchers and experts Lawrence Hawkim, MD, a board-certified urologist at the Cleveland Clinic, Kevin Pantalone, DO, a board-certified endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic, and Jessica Shepherd, MD, MBA, FACOG, board-certified OB/GYN and thought leader on menopause, speak to the science between masturbation and testosterone levels.

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While masturbation does influence testosterone, it does not decrease these levels, according to Cleveland Clinic urologist Dr. Hawkim. He says masturbation neither triggers hypogonadism (low testosterone or low T) nor impacts long-term testosterone levels. However, Dr. Hawkim says, its short-term effects are still under investigation.

Researchers in Germany, focusing on molecular and cellular sports medicine and cardiovascular research, also investigated this subject. Their 2021 study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Basic and Clinical Andrology, suggests that masturbating before strength training could actually lead to a temporary boost in testosterone levels, aiding in muscle growth. Further studies are necessary to solidify these findings.

Testosterone is also essential for females, particularly postmenopausal women. Dr. Shepherd explains that reductions in testosterone, along with decreases in estrogen and progesterone during menopause, impact the physical response as well as the psychological response surrounding sexual activity. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and considering hormone supplementation can be important for women during this transition.

An article published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine in 2021 found that higher testosterone levels in women are associated with increased libido and more frequent masturbation or sexual activity, and, like in men, the long-term effects of masturbation on testosterone levels appear negligible.

Although further research is necessary to fully understand the specific effects of various sexual activities like masturbation on testosterone levels, current scientific evidence and expert consensus indicate that masturbation does not cause a long-term decrease in testosterone levels.

According to the American Urology Association (AUA), low blood testosterone is defined as levels below 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). Dr. Hakim notes that anything that negatively affects overall health can diminish testosterone levels.

Here are several factors that commonly lead to decreased testosterone:

Low T can present through various symptoms. Here are some typical signs to be aware of:

Boosting your testosterone is largely about embracing a healthier lifestyle.

Dr. Pantalone explains, Its normal for a person to experience a drop in testosterone as they age, but were seeing that process accelerated in more recent times because of poor overall health.

Here are some effective strategies to enhance your hormonal health:

Exercise more: Regular physical activity, especially strength training and high-intensity interval training, can boost testosterone levels.

Eat healthy: Focus on a balanced diet rich in proteins, healthy fats, and whole grains. Foods like eggs, leafy greens, and fatty fish are particularly beneficial. Avoid excess alcohol, smoking, and substance use.

Get quality sleep and manage stress: Aim for 7-9 hours of sleep per night and explore stress reduction techniques such as meditation, yoga, or deep breathing exercises.

If youre concerned about your testosterone levels or are experiencing symptoms such as fatigue or low libido, consult your healthcare provider. They can perform tests to determine the cause, which may be linked to low testosterone or another health issue. They can also discuss if you need testosterone replacement therapy if levels are significantly low due to medical conditions.

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Jun 13

New Research Reveals What Ancient Humans Ate During the Bronze and Iron Ages – Inverse

The Mediterranean diet might conjure images of whole grains, fish, a side of cucumber and tomato salad, and a glass of red wine. While the diet, known for its link to longevity and health, has skyrocketed in popularity in recent years, this eating pattern is far from new. In fact, a recent study reveals that this way of eating has persisted for millennia. Published today in the journal PLoS ONE, a paper looked at the agricultural and diet patterns of people living in whats now Syria during the Middle Bronze Age, which occurred from 2000 to 1600 BCE. It turns out humans have been eating a Mediterranean diet since at least the Bronze Age.

The research looks at plant, animal, and human remains from an archaeological site in modern-day Syria known as Tell Tweini on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. Tell Tweini is located near the modern town Jableh, and was once part of an ancient harbor city called Gibala, the southernmost town of the Ugarit Kingdom in the Levant.

Understanding ancient cultures is not only important for archaeologists, but for anyone interested in the history of the origins and development of humankind, Simone Riehl, professor of archaeobotany at the University of Tbingen in Germany, tells Inverse. Food especially is telling of all sorts of conditions. One of the oldest culturally anchored expressions of human life is food.

A communal tomb from the Middle Bronze Age II (second half of the 17th century BC).

The team from Belgium, Germany, and Canada performed isotopic analysis on plant, animal, and human remains from this site. Their results demonstrate that, among other things, the inhabitants of Tell Tweini consumed food consistent with what we now know as the Mediterranean diet. They also seemed to use animals for farm labor rather than sustenance, and they were excellent grape cultivators. In particular, the results suggest that residents of Tell Tweini ate a diet rich in grains like emmer and durum wheat, olives, pulses, grapes, dairy, and a small amount of meat.

The researchers gleaned their findings from analysis of 410 plant seeds, 210 animal bones, and 16 human bones. The paper found that within these relics at the atomic level are stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. Isotopes are elements with variations in the number of neutrons they have, and they reside in bones and teeth. When measured, these isotopes convey key information about everything from agricultural practices and local climate patterns to animal keeping and diet.

The old phrase you are what you eat really is true here, says Benjamin Fuller, an archaeological chemistry researcher at the University of Leuven in Belgium. The technique of stable isotope ratio analysis allows the direct determination of the type of food groups that were actually consumed.

The paper describes that teeth and bones hold the protein collagen, which is rich in carbon and nitrogen. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes, specifically carbon-13 and nitrogen-15, are stable enough that they stick around in the body after consumption. The ratio of carbon and nitrogen in collagen reflects that of a plant or animal proteins that this person ate while living. Particular ratios of carbon and nitrogen isotopes indicate whether a protein came from a plant or animal, which can tell us the composition of someones diet.

This technique also clues us into agricultural practices. Fuller says that grapes had the highest carbon isotopic results of all the plants, which suggests they were likely very well cared for and experienced excellent growing conditions, reflecting the importance of grapevine production during the Bronze and Iron Ages in this region. Even during fraught times of climate and social change, Fuller says, the inhabitants of Tell Tweini devoted a lot of focus and care to their vineyards.

Animals were still key to agriculture in Tell Tweini, the researchers hypothesize. Riehl says that cattle, sheep, and goats in these cultures were primarily agricultural work animals crucial to cheese and wool production rather than meat. Fuller agrees and depicts what the circumstance may have been: If your cow was used for its secondary products such as cheese or milk as well as being your tractor, you would not kill it and eat it right away.

So way back in the day, it appears the Mediterranean diet was a consequence of pragmatism. Subsisting primarily on crops meant preserving animals for other uses. Even if most of us dont have to consider what we eat in the same way, Riehl suggests we could still benefit from a more thoughtful agricultural and eating practice. To her, this research shows us how improving animal husbandry conditions and reducing meat consumption can be good for us and animals.

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Jun 13

Middle Easterns relied on Mediterranean Diet thousands of years ago – Shelbynews

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Middle Easterns relied on Mediterranean Diet thousands of years ago - Shelbynews

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Jun 13

Middle Easterns relied on Mediterranean Diet thousands of years ago – Rockdale Newton Citizen

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Jun 13

This Morning viewers ‘switch off’ and ‘nearly vomit’ over guest’s ‘disgusting’ diet habit – Yahoo Movies UK

This Morning viewers were left feeling queasy and compelled to turn off their TVs during the latest episode. Wednesday's episode (June 12) featured hosts Cat Deeley and Ben Shephard chatting with American guest Weston Rowe from his home.

He first sparked comments when he appeared on Friday's Celebrity Gogglebox episode, where the celebrities were seen reacting to My Strange Addiction.

On the show, Weston revealed his unusual diet: "I'm addicted to eating raw meat. The real game changer is when people find out that I'm eating raw chicken", and he shared more about his dietary habits: "In four years I've eaten about 100 raw chickens and I've never been sick. I actually also eat raw internal organs.", reports the Mirror.

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Following the response, This Morning got him on the show in which he discussed his raw meat diet, which costs him over $9,000 annually. Weston, who switched to raw meat for health reasons, explained how he initially struggled with the taste but now claims he's accustomed to it.

Despite medical advice to the contrary, Weston boasts of consuming hundreds of raw chickens without ever contracting salmonella. In a stomach-turning moment, he ate a raw chicken leg on air, describing it as 'squishy' and 'slimy', followed by raw liver, prompting disgusted reactions from viewers.

Taking to Twitter, now X, one person said: "#ThisMorning Ive had to turn over, this man eating raw chicken almost made me throw up. It was disgusting. I dont know who even thought of having this segment. So wrong!", a different account put: "Oh I think I'm gonna be sick!! #thismorning", another wrote: "Stop with the raw meat bloke it's knocking me sick #ThisMorning".

A different account put: "Urgh what im i watching #thismorning" with a sick emoji, another said: "Sorry but this is not necessary to see that!!!! #thismorning" while a different account added: "Stop with the raw meat bloke it's knocking me sick #ThisMorning."

During the first episode of the new series of Celebrity Gogglebox on Friday (June 7), Rylan Clark, watching alongside his mother Linda, was astounded by Weston's confession, exclaiming: "How the f**k is that bloke sniffing a chicken's a*****e and eating raw chicken..." His humorous reaction continued as he joked about his own love life: "And I'm still single! ".

As the programme progressed and Weston was seen indulging in his raw meat, Rylan found it too much to stomach, leading him to leave the room. Struggling with nausea, he coughed while his mother laughed and advised, "Go out, go out as you're going to be sick, go out there! " Rylan then excused himself, saying, "I can't watch it! Just give me a minute, I need to walk away! ".

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This Morning viewers 'switch off' and 'nearly vomit' over guest's 'disgusting' diet habit - Yahoo Movies UK

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Jun 13

Vegan fake meats linked to heart disease, early death: study – New York Post

This is not ha-peanews for vegans.

While experts extol the health and environmental benefits of a diet free of animal products, new research suggests that consuming ultra-processed vegan food can increase the risk of heart death.

Ultra-processed foods include packaged goods, drinks, cereals and ready-to-eat products that contain colors, emulsifiers, flavors and other additives. UPFs are typically high in sugar, saturated fat, and salt and devoid of vitamins and fiber.

Researchers from the UniversityofSo Paulo and Imperial College London assessed the diets of more than 118,000 Brits aged 40 to 69 years old.

They found that a plant-based eating plan promotes overall heart health, but only when that diet features fresh plant-based foods such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains and legumes.

Researchers found that for every 10% increase in plant-based foods, the risk of death from heart disease fell by 20%.

Yet, when the increase in plant-based foods came from UPFs, it was linked to a 12% rise in heart disease-related deaths.

Lead study author Fernanda Rauber explained that the composition and processing methods of UPFs can lead to higher blood pressure and cholesterol.

Food additives and industrial contaminants present in these foods might cause oxidative stress and inflammation, further aggravating the risks, she said.

Those shifting towards plant-based foods should also think about the degree of processing involved before making their choices.

Dr. Eszter Vamos, co-author of the study, noted the deceptive marketing and public perception of plant-based products as healthy.

While ultra-processed foods are often marketed as healthy foods, this large study suggests that plant-based ultra-processed foods do not seem to have protective health effects and are linked to poor health outcomes, she said.

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The study found that replacing plant-based UPFs withwhole foods, known to have important health and environmental benefits, decreased deaths from heart disease by 15% and reduced the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease by 7%.

Researchers claim that this study, published Monday in Lancet Regional Health, is the first to show that plant-based UPFs increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Based on their findings, the authors are urging nutritional guidelines that promote plant-based diets to include a warning to avoid UPFs.

The study highlights the cardiovascular risk of consuming popular meat alternatives, but independent scientists point out that half of the UPFs used in the study came from plant-based breads and pastries.

Many foods that do not contain animal products, which includes biscuits, crisps, confectionery and soft drinks, are technically plant-based but would not be considered essential as part of a healthy diet by the majority of people, Duane Mellor, a dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association, said in a statement.

Mellor stressed the importance of a balanced diet rich in whole foods like vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts and whole grains.

It is important to emphasize that just because a food or drink is technically plant-based, it does not mean it is healthy, he said.

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Vegan fake meats linked to heart disease, early death: study - New York Post

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Jun 13

Dietary Supplement Found to Reduce Aggression by Up to 28% – ScienceAlert

Keep calm and try omega-3. The fatty acids, available as dietary supplements via fish oil capsules and thought to help with mental and physical well-being, could also cut down on aggression, according to a new study.

These findings haven't come out of nowhere: omega-3 has previously been linked to preventing schizophrenia, while aggression and antisocial behavior are thought in part to stem from a lack of nutrition. What we eat can influence our brain's chemistry.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania built on earlier, smaller studies of omega-3 supplementation effects on aggression. Their meta-analysis looked at 29 randomized controlled trials across 3,918 participants in total.

Across all the trials, a modest but noticeable short-term effect was found, translating to up to a 28 percent reduction in aggression across multiple different variables (including age, gender, medical diagnosis, and length and dosage of treatment).

"I think the time has come to implement omega-3 supplementation to reduce aggression, irrespective of whether the setting is the community, the clinic, or the criminal justice system," says neurocriminologist Adrian Raine.

The trials included in the study, carried out between 1996 and 2024, ran for an average of 16 weeks. They covered a variety of demographics, from children aged 16 and under to older people aged between 50 and 60.

What's more, the reductions in aggression included both reactive aggression (in response to provocation) and proactive aggression (behavior planned in advance). Before this study, it wasn't clear if omega-3 could help with these different types of aggression.

While larger studies across longer periods of time are going to be needed to further establish this relationship, it adds to our understanding of how fish oil pills and the omega-3 in them might be beneficial for the brain.

"At the very least, parents seeking treatment for an aggressive child should know that in addition to any other treatment that their child receives, an extra portion or two of fish each week could also help," says Raine.

The researchers think something in the way that omega-3 reduces inflammation and keeps vital brain processes ticking over might be helping regulate aggression. There are still a lot of unanswered questions, but the team suggests there's enough evidence to look into this further.

Add in the studies that show that medications derived from fish oil can help reduce the risk of fatal heart attacks, strokes, and other heart health problems, and there seems to be plenty of upside to adding some omega-3 to your diet.

"Omega-3 is not a magic bullet that is going to completely solve the problem of violence in society," says Raine.

"But can it help? Based on these findings, we firmly believe it can, and we should start to act on the new knowledge we have."

The research has been published in Aggression and Violent Behavior.

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Jun 13

Middle Easterns relied on Mediterranean Diet thousands of years ago – WNBJ 39

By Stephen Beech via SWNS

People in the Middle East were living on the Mediterranean Diet 2,800 years ago, according to new research.

What Ancient Syrians ate resembled the trendy present-day eating plan, say scientists.

An international team analyzed chemistry of plant, animal, human remains to study historic food chains

They found that people in ancient Syria likely ate mostly grains, grapes, olives and a small amount of dairy and meat - similar to todays Med diet.

Celebrities including Penlope Cruz, Cameron Diaz, Selena Gomez and Catherine Zeta-Jones are among fans of the eating plan which has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

It emphasizes plant-based foods with followers mostly eating fruit, veg, and whole grains while extra virgin olive oil is the main source of fat.

Tell Tweini, an archaeological site near the Syrian coastal city of Jableh, contains relics dating back to the early Bronze Age, around 2,600 BC, stretching into the Iron Age, nearly 2,300 years later.

Photo by Dana Tentis via Pexels

For the new study, researchers used isotopic analyses of plant, animal and human remains from the site to map how nutrients flowed through the food chain and agricultural systems on this land over time.

Study co-author Dr. Simone Riehl, of the University of Tbingen in Germany, said some of the most interesting results came from the Middle Bronze Age, between 2000 BC and 1600 BC.

She explained that human remains from that period showed a relatively low level of 15N - a nitrogen isotope - which indicates a diet mostly based on plants, such as grains and olives.

But archaeologists have also found the remains of sheep, goats and cattle from Tell Tweini that suggest that those animals were occasionally eaten and used for milking, meaning the local residents were likely consuming some animal-based protein as well.

Riehl said: "This diet is similar to the modern day 'Mediterranean diet' that highlights grains, fruits and vegetables with fewer animal products, often touted for its health benefits.

"Other isotopic analyses from Tell Tweini may shed light on some of the climate and agricultural practices of the people who lived there."

The findings, published in the journal PLOS One, showed, for example, that all of the grapes found at Tell Tweini have relatively high levels of the Delta 13 isotope of carbon.

Riehl says that suggests that the fruits received enough water and were well looked after throughout the sites history.

She added: Thanks to the interdisciplinary and technical progress of archaeological science, we can not only speculate on the existence of a long cultural tradition of the Mediterranean diet through taxonomic and typological determinations but also extend these findings through additional analyses.

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Middle Easterns relied on Mediterranean Diet thousands of years ago - WNBJ 39

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Jun 13

The surprisingly spiritual benefits of Mosley’s 5:2 diet | Opinion | Premier Christianity – Premier Christianity

I have the late Dr Michael Mosley to thank for making me less of the man I am today. A decade ago, after 20 years of what we were pleased to call business lunches, I had ballooned into a self-satisfied whale.

I was persuaded to go on Mosleys 5:2 Diet, which consists of consuming a maximum of 500 calories on two separate days of the week and largely eating what you like (within reason) for the other five. I gradually lost four stone, which overdid things a bit and people said I looked ill, or like a geography teacher on a field day. So I regained a stone and stabilised with a 6:1 maintenance diet.

Im aware that last paragraph makes me a contender for worlds most boring dinner-party guest, so let me get, I hope, to a more engaging point. Mosley called it the Fast Diet. In some of my old jobs, which were basically talking nonsense for large sums of money (and lunches), I would have called that terrible branding.

It sounds like fast as in quick, like one of those useless crash diets. It actually means fast as in intermittent fasting, which religious communities would know as abstinence and self-denial. Historically, in monkish communities and the like, weight loss wasnt a priority. Fasting was about penitence, separation from the worldly to feel closer to God as well as mental and physical preparation for a great religious festival.

It has always been a spiritual exercise. And Im here to tell you it works with Mosleys diet too. Yes, theres the body-and-mind nexus. At a routine medical, a nurse took my blood sample twice because she couldnt see how I could have had the cholesterol levels of a vegan extreme marathon runner (well, sort of), given my confessed flaneur lifestyle. So you feel better, not just lighter.

For many, of faith or not, the spirituality of fasting can sound a bit woo-woo, a bit hermit-like, or a bit too ascetic. But it can be put a bit more bluntly. It is, simply, good for one to feel hungry for a couple of days a week.

This is not remotely about solidarity with the hungry of the world. On a fast day, I can look forward to a full English breakfast in the morning if I so wish. Its also not about false piety. I have heard someone intone solemnly: I live simply, so that others may simply live. Thats enough to make you feel sick even on an empty stomach.

But it does enhance the pleasure and appreciation of food (and wine) on the other five days of the week, whether you believe its a gift of Gods harvest or not. It also concentrates the mind theres a mental acuity attached to fasting. The chronology of the Nazarenes 40-day fast in the wilderness between his baptism and the start of his ministry is no accident.

Mosleys Fast Diet should make no apology for drawing on such ancient heritage. Fasting was rigorously practised in Judaism, as prescribed in the Hebrew Bible. Its been known to be good for us for a very long time.

Fasting was a regular practice for the apostles as recorded in the Book of Acts. And theres a very sweet resonance with Mosleys 5:2 in theDidache, the short early Christian rulebook from (probably) the first century AD. Itmentions two regular weekly fast days of Wednesday and Friday. Anyone choosing those days for their 5:2 may like to know theyre in that tradition.

The spiritual danger is in fasting practices becoming false idols. Fasting laws are honoured more in the breach throughout the gospels, with the Jesus movement unlawfully plucking grain to eat on the Jewish Sabbath, and the parable of the Pharisee who is condemned for his hypocrisy for swanning it over a miserable publican because he fasts twice a week. I most certainly dont do my 5:2 when Im on holiday, which is ironic given the etymology of that word.

The enemy of fasting is evidently smugness. Its relatively easy to fast if you work predominantly from home. Less easy if youre flat out, burning energy at work (though I managed it in a high pressure job in Canary Wharf in fact it was vital).

Ultimately its an aid to prayer. As it happens, Mosley came from a long line of missionaries, but he admitted: The closest I get to religion is incorporating fasting in my diet.

Id just like to say that I think thats very close indeed. God rest him.

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The surprisingly spiritual benefits of Mosley's 5:2 diet | Opinion | Premier Christianity - Premier Christianity

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Jun 13

Michael Mosley missing on Greeces Symi island, sparking major search operation – The Washington Post

LONDON Authorities in Greece are searching for British television doctor Michael Mosley, who is famous for popularizing the 5:2 diet and other forms of intermittent fasting, after he went missing on the island of Symi this week.

Greek authorities launched an investigation after being informed of Mosleys disappearance Thursday, with the search continuing Friday, the Greek fire service said in an email, adding that police officers, the fire brigade, volunteers and a trained police dog were all involved in the search.

The small island is in the eastern Aegean Sea and lies around four miles off the coast of Turkey.

Mosley, 67, is well-known for co-authoring the 2013 book The Fast Diet. The plan, later known as the 5:2 diet, involved drastically reducing calories for two days a week while eating healthily on other days.

He later wrote another weight loss book, The Fast 800.

Summarized stories to quickly stay informed

An appeal for information about Mosley, together with a photo of him wearing a blue polo shirt and baseball cap, was posted on a local Facebook group Wednesday evening, saying that he had set off to walk back from a local beach at about 1:30 p.m. and failed to make it home.

Further updates on the post the following day said that a search and rescue team was sent from Athens with drones and other more sophisticated equipment to extend the search.

A police spokesman said that Mosleys phone was found at his accommodation, according to the BBC.

Mosleys disappearance also made headlines on Greek news outlets Friday. Local mayor Lefteris Papakalodoukas told one newspaper that the terrain in the area where Mosley went missing is difficult, as it is quite rocky, adding that the heat on Wednesday was unbearable and one could easily faint in such conditions. The BBC reported that temperatures on Symi had exceeded 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) that day.

According to his personal website, Mosley studied at the University of Oxford and worked as an investment banker before turning to medicine. He later joined the BBC as a trainee, and went on to work on science and history documentaries.

In 2002, he was nominated for an Emmy award for his work as an executive producer on the documentary series The Human Face, presented by Monty Python star John Cleese.

In recent years, he has continued to appear regularly on British television.

He and his wife, Clare Bailey Mosley, a doctor who created recipes for his Fast 800 plan, have four children.

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Michael Mosley missing on Greeces Symi island, sparking major search operation - The Washington Post

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