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Jul 3

Study shows that telecardiac rehab can help adherence, exercise capacity – The Jerusalem Post

A new clinical study has found that telecardiac rehabilitation (tele-CR) can improve adherence and exercise capacity among patients of cardiac rehabilitation, providing a viable alternative to center-based rehabilitation programs, according to a Thursday press release from Datos Health, a provider of hospital-grade automated remote care and telemedicine platforms.

The study, titled Feasibility, Safety, and Effectiveness of a Mobile Application in Cardiac Rehabilitation, was published in the Israel Medical Association Journal (IMAJ), and focused on evaluating clinical and physiological results, in addition to patient adherence, as a means for assessing the viability of tele-CR as an alternative to location-based programs in medical centers.

The six-month trial was performed at Shebas Cardiac Rehabilitation Center, as a first attempt to use digital health technology to monitor patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation.

In response to the findings, Prof. Robert Klempfner, MD, Director of the Israeli Center for Cardiovascular Research and Scientific Director of the ARC Innovation Center at Sheba Medical Center, said that despite the clear benefits of CR in reducing cardiac moralities and improving overall quality of life, it is often woefully underutilized for reasons including challenges in attending rehabilitation centers and interference with day-to-day life.

He added that the findings of this study reveal considerable advantages of tele-CR in the increase of adherence to exercise programs and improved patient outcomes. The versatility of Datos remote care platform and its ability to increase patient engagement and adherence through personalization of the application is integral to making tele-CR a viable option for patients unable or unwilling to participate in center-based CR programs.

The results of the study showed that significant improvements were seen in exercise capacity and consistent adherence among CR patients, with over 63% completing the goal of 150 minutes of aerobic exercise per week. Similarly, patient satisfaction was favorable, scoring 4.05 out of 5 among participants.

The system was based on patients receiving a smartphone application with a customized care plan, including monitoring devices that provide medical feedback during training. Datos was responsible for developing the application, whereby a care team would monitor patient activity and adherence. The study's success has resulted in Israel's Health Ministry defining a new reimbursement code.

As shown by the [Israeli] Ministry of Healths actions, this can also effect positive regulatory change. However, success of such programs is dependent on developing strong partnerships between healthcare organizations and technology developers. Datos has enjoyed a long-standing relationship with Prof. Klempfner and his team at Sheba. This collaboration is further evidence of how together we can bring positive change to the provision of care for the benefit of large patient populations, Bettesh noted.

Excerpt from:
Study shows that telecardiac rehab can help adherence, exercise capacity - The Jerusalem Post


Jul 3

Parkinsons took the game away from this avid golfer. Now, this program is giving it back – Golf.com

On a sweltering June afternoon at Wigwam Golf Resort, outside Phoenix, Mike Boze tracked the flight of his opening tee shot.

Sweat beaded on his brow, and tears welled in his eyes. His ball found the fairway, which is not why Boze felt weepy. At 80, he was back to playing golf for the first time in nine years.

A dream come true, Boze said. I never thought Id be doing this again.

For most of his life, the game had been engrained in his weekly routine. But in 2010, around his 70th birthday, Boze noticed that his hands had started shaking. In time, the tremors spread. His balance grew unsteady. On bad days, he could barely raise his arms.

Tests confirmed what doctors suspected: Boze had Parkinsons disease, a disorder of the central nervous system.

A former collegiate swimmer and ex-Air Force fighter pilot in Vietnam, Boze wasnt one to give in to physical discomfort. In the high desert around his home in Scottsdale, he kept pegging it with friends at local courses. But it was difficult to walk, much less swing a club. Before long, he was forced to mothball his sticks.

Giving up the game was painful, Boze said. I lost touch with people. I got knocked out of friendships.

Amicably divorced, with two grown daughters, Boze lived alone and liked it. But that, too, became a struggle he could no longer sustain. In early 2019, he sold his place in Scottsdale and moved to the Glencroft Center for Modern Aging, a senior living community in nearby Glendale.

The relocation came with a whiff of resignation.

I felt like I was leaving all the good stuff behind, he said.

Set on 40 tree-lined acres, some 20 minutes northwest of the Phoenix airport, the Glencroft Center is home to more than 900 residents age 62 and older, all receiving customized degrees of care. Picture a college campus, crossed with the film set from Cocoon.

You could hear the change in his voice. For so many years, he had so much taken away from him. You could tell that he felt like he had something to look forward to again.

Kelly Thomas, Bozes daughter

When Boze arrived, settling into a condo in a complex set aside for independent living, the Glencroft Center had just hired Steve Heller, an energetic man in his mid-40s with a background in exercise physiology. At the dawn of his career, in the late 1990s, Heller had trained NFL and NBA prospects before founding Fore-Max Training, a golf-focused fitness program, based in Scottsdale, that attracted a range of talents, from weekend duffers to collegiate stars and PGA Tour stalwarts such as Kevin Streelman and Ricky Barnes.

Hellers work with golfers on strength, flexibility, mobility and balance put him in good stead to help clients with the challenges of aging. At the Glencroft Center, he was tasked with creating a fall-prevention program. Heller recognized this as a crucial mission. But, he thought, why stop there?

So much of aging care in this country seemed to me to be about keeping people safe in their wheelchairs and their scooters so they could go play bingo or cards, Heller said. My feeling was, these people are capable of so much more and eager for so much more. Lets help them continue doing, or get back to doing, the things they love the most.

As Heller saw it, Mike Boze was a poster child for this ambition. Soon after theyd first met on the Glencroft Center campus, the two men had discovered their shared love of golf. Boze lit up when they discussed the game. But he only spoke about it in the past tense.

Heller suggested he focus on the future.

I told him to give me two weeks of working out every day, Heller said. Not only would he have better balance, and be moving way more fluidly, but Id eventually get him making solid contact with a golf ball again.

Boze was skeptical but told Heller: If you can pull that off, Id be forever grateful.

Boze works with Heller and Paul Smith, one of main instructors at the Warren Schutte Players Academy.

Courtesy Photo

With Boze as inspiration, Heller expanded on his fall-prevention classes, stitching golf-specific movements into the mix. He dusted off equipment from his Fore-Max days swing fans, impact bags, training aids, weighted clubs and pushed Boze through modified versions of the same exercises hed once made Streelman do.

At the same time, through a $20,000 private grant, Heller acquired virtual reality consoles and linked them to golf platforms, providing Boze with an immersive golf experience as he worked on getting back to the real thing.

As Hellers program took shape, it also took a name. At the Glencroft Center, it was christened ZoeLife, a name derived from a Biblical term for pursuing an active and purposeful existence.

It instilled new meaning into Bozes days.

You could hear the change in his voice, Kelly Thomas, Bozes daughter, said. For so many years, he had so much taken away from him. It had gotten him really down. Now, suddenly, there was excitement when he talked. You could tell that he felt like he had something to look forward to again.

Bozes path forward was not a cakewalk. Hellers regimen for him involved 90 minutes of daily morning workouts, a challenging routine made more demanding by Bozes condition. Boze would leave each session feeling loose and limber, but within hours, his muscles would seize up.

Its something we see in all our Parkinsons guys, Heller said. The disease just grabs them, and takes over. It becomes a mental battle on top of the physical challenge. There are just so many hurdles they have to clear.

The Covid-19 crisis further complicated matters, throwing a wrench into daily rhythms. But Boze persisted, making incremental progress with his morning workouts. Within weeks, he was back to chipping golf balls. Within months, hed regained enough balance to start making full swings.

It took a decade, but Boze finally got back to the course. And he couldnt be happier.

Courtesy Photo

By then, other Glencroft Center residents had taken notice. Some were also golfers whod given up the game. A second senior joined Hellers morning sessions. Then a third. Then a fourth.

Word of the ZoeLife program began to spread. It reached Wigwam Golf Resort, where Warren Schutte, a former Tour pro, runs a golf academy that bears his name. Liking what he heard, Schutte contacted Heller and offered his facility as a practice and training ground for Glencroft Center seniors.

I run junior programs here, and theres no doubt in my mind that junior programs are vitally important, Schutte said. But just because were working with a lot of kids doesnt mean we should forget about the older population.

It is, after all, a large pool.

In 2019, golfers 65 and older accounted for 19 percent of the countrys 24.3 million golfers, according to data from the National Golf Foundation. In the coming years, that percentage is expected to grow, as Baby Boomers age into the demographic. How long theyll stick with golf is another matter. Though exact figures are hard to come by, its no secret that every year, large numbers of seniors give up the game due to illness, injury, financial constraints or other reasons. For all the talk of growing the game by bringing newbies to it, less attention goes toward keeping longtime players in it.

How many others are out there like Mike Boze? Heller said. No doubt in my mind. There are a lot.

Out on the first hole at Wigwam, Boze climbed into a cart. Heller sat beside him at the wheel. June in Arizona. The sun was searing. Boze smiled and shook his head in disbelief. Nearly six months after hed begun his workouts, and nearly a decade since hed last struck a shot that counted, he had just split the fairway with a lazy draw. Arriving at his ball, Boze smacked another shot. And then another. The hole was a par-5. Boze reached the green in 4, with 12 feet left for par.

Boze ran his first putt past, then lipped out the come-backer the sweetest double bogey he had ever recorded. From the heat and the excitement, he felt fatigued already. That wasnt going to stop him. Riding to the next tee, Boze dabbed his eyes again. Golf had supplied him with a life of memories. Now he was bent on making more.

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Parkinsons took the game away from this avid golfer. Now, this program is giving it back - Golf.com


Jul 3

In conversation with Carl Georgevski, Varsity Blues track and field head coach – Varsity

The Varsity had an opportunity to speak with Varsity Blues track and field head coach Carl Georgevski about the teams adapted training routines amidst the pandemic.

The former Ontario University Athletics high jump champion and graduate of the University of Torontos Faculty of Physical Education and Health now known as the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education spoke about the challenges of coaching through Zoom, the uncertainty of returning to campus in the fall, and ways to stay healthy and active while complying with physical distancing measures.

The Varsity: How has the track and field team adapted its training in light of the pandemic? And how have you been finding the experience of coaching online?

Carl Georgevski: Track and field is one program, but its divided into different areas. So we have our middle distance cross country area; we have our sprints and hurdles area; we have our jumps combined events area; we have our throws area. So each coach has a unique way of delivering the program to the athletes in each area.

It was easiest to adapt the training of middle- and long-distance runners right from the beginning, since theyre used to running outside on the streets. It was a bit different for our sprint group. You cannot sprint on the hard concrete every single day youre going to do more harm than good to your lower extremities, your hips, and your back. So weve been holding training and circuit sessions with them on Zoom.

For jumps and combined events athletes, I send out a weekly training guide, and every Saturday morning I have combined events meetings. Whenever they need a bit of a pick-me-up and a good laugh, I send them videos of me demonstrating the exercise. Then they send me a video of what theyre doing and I go over the video with them to make sure theyre doing the right thing.

On Wednesdays, our strength and conditioning coach holds a Zoom circuit workout with the entire team, so all the athletes can get back together that way. We had an entire team meeting, with returning and incoming students, and it was kind of neat!

TV: When do you expect to return to campus, or to be back on track?

CG: We dont know. We follow the universitys policies and guidelines. Safety and everyones well-being is our first priority. In our next team meeting, which is going to happen in a couple of weeks, we should have more information on what things are going to look like in the fall.

TV: Now that we have fewer options to exercise, but more time on our hands, what are your first steps for readers who are interested in developing a running or workout routine?

CG: Number one: start slowly, start gently dont overdo it. If you make a mistake, always make the mistake of undergoing rather than overdoing. If you overdo it, youre going to be hurting especially if youre hitting the streets right now, because the concrete is not very lower-extremity friendly. So, for people who have never done any kind of running, I would even suggest to start walking and gradually transition into jogging. Then, increase the distance that youve been covering by half a kilometre at a time.

There are also some great programs online, like From Couch to 5k. Even if you have the big aspiration of being a marathon runner, there are beginner programs for marathoners as well. Training hard and smart, thats the key to success. Why not start off slowly and gradually build and strengthen your muscles and tendons rather than doing it all at once?

TV: How much time a day would you recommend dedicating to exercise?

CG: If you havent ever done anything athletic, take 15 minutes and do something active. In a way this pandemic is a gift to you personally what else have you got to do? Take one hour a day and totally dedicate it to yourself, even if that means putting your feet up, drinking tea, and not thinking about work. Look after your body; its the only one you have. Look after your mind. And the way you look after your mind is by looking after your body to a large extent.

TV: If thats your coaching philosophy for the pandemic, Im sure your athletes are very fortunate to have you as a coach. Im sure a lot of people are looking for guidance right now.

CG: Well, sometimes my athletes look at me and say, Are you for real? With the coaching philosophy in our program, no one ever gets yelled at, nobody gets put down, because were here to build. Were here to empower, and the only way that I can empower you is to allow you to feel comfortable in the environment that I set, and for me to challenge you. So, having said everything that Ive said about our program, what it really comes down to is passion about what youre doing and having no regrets.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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In conversation with Carl Georgevski, Varsity Blues track and field head coach - Varsity


Jul 3

The Latest: USL’s Indy Eleven to return with limited fans – Middletown Press

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

___

The United Soccer Leagues Indy Eleven will return to action next Saturday with limited fans at Lucas Oil Stadium.

League officials announced a 263-game schedule that will be played over a 13-week span, leading to a 16-team playoff scheduled for October.

Indy also released a nearly 2,000-word document about changes that will be implemented at the stadium, home of the NFLs Indianapolis Colts, to protect those inside from COVID-19.

Changes include mandatory face coverings inside the stadium except when people are eating or drinking, limiting groups to four or fewer tickets, separating those groups with at least four empty seats and using a minimum of every other row to maintain social distancing.

Tailgating will not be permitted. Fans also will enter the stadium in staggered 15-minute shifts and will exit by row with those nearest the exits leaving first.

Each ticket holder also will be asked if theyve been in close contact with anyone who had a confirmed case of COVID-19 and if they are experiencing specific symptoms of the illness before they can undergo a temperature check. Anyone topping 100.4 degrees will not be admitted, though fans can request a recheck after a cooling down period.

Security checks will be conducted with walk-through magnetometers and ticket-scanning will be contactless. Concession lines will be marked with spots 6 feet apart, condiments will be served in single-serve packets, refills of food or beverages will not be allowed and most items will be served in sealed containers or wraps.

Players, referees and staff who are not competing on the field also will be required to wear face coverings. Flag bearers, player escorts and ball kids will not be used, and players will be discouraged from celebrating with hugs or high-fives.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

The Latest: USL's Indy Eleven to return with limited fans

Ten of Indys 15 remaining games will be played at Lucas Oil Stadium.

Indianapolis also will be hosting the first NHRA drag racing events next Saturday with limited fans in attendance.

___

The Boston Red Sox are getting ready to open their spring training reboot at Fenway Park.

On Thursday, a day before the team was scheduled to hold its first workouts, weights and exercise equipment were set up in the concourse to allow players to work out with more social distancing than the usual cramped facilities would allow.

Masked grounds crew members worked to get the field ready.

Baseball suspended spring training in March because of the coronavirus outbreak and delayed opening day. The players and owners agreed last month to try again, with teams reporting for workouts on Friday and the first games of a 60-game schedule to be played in empty ballparks on July 23 or 24.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker was at Fenway on Thursday to sign an order allowing the Red Sox to open the ballpark without fans as the state launches Phase 3 of its reopening plan.

___

New York Mets hitting coach Chili Davis will continue working remotely when the teams summer camp opens Friday.

The New York Post was first to report that the 60-year-old Davis wont be on site at Citi Field for the beginning of practices because of concerns about the coronavirus.

The timeline for him to join us is uncertain yet, new Mets manager Luis Rojas said on a video call Thursday.

The Post, citing anonymous sources in its report, said Davis does not have the virus.

Rojas said all other coaches and players have reported for intake screening. Assistant hitting coach Tom Slater will substitute on site for Davis, who lives in Arizona during the offseason.

I think were going to get the best of Chili whether hes with us at the start of camp or whether hes working remotely. I mean, were in constant communication. Chili and I practically talk every day and hes in communication with the coaches, Rojas said. So hes going to be helping us. Hes a great asset, hes got great knowledge, great experience. He helps the players with hitting, with playing the game. He helps the coaches as well with his view of the game. So he is going to be working remotely and were going to feel his presence.

___

Boise State is cutting its baseball and womens swimming and diving programs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The program cuts, along with additional department and program operating reductions, will reduce the overall athletic budget by nearly $3 million.

This is one of the hardest decisions athletic departments have to make, but it comes at a time when we are facing the most serious financial challenge we have ever seen, Boise State athletic director Curt Apsey said in a statement Thursday.

The cut to baseball comes after the program was recently reinstated. The school announced in 2017 that baseball was being added after it had been discontinued following the 1980 season. The 2020 season was Boise States return, but the Broncos played only 14 games before the season was canceled.

The school said all scholarships for athletes in the affected programs, including incoming 2020 signings, will be honored.

___

Finishers of the virtual Boston Marathon will receive their medals in an Amazon package instead of having a volunteer drape it around their necks on Boylston Street.

Race organizers announced plans for the event on Thursday. Runners will have from Sept. 7-14 to complete the 26.2-mile distance and submit proof. There is no time limit, but it must be completed in one continuous run.

Also included in the post-race package will be a participation shirt, a program, a bottle opener and other unspecified celebratory items.

The virtual race is open for those who had already registered for the real one, which was scheduled for April 20 and then put off until Sept. 14 before it was canceled. The cost to register for the virtual race is $50.

The Boston Athletic Association says it is encouraging the more than 10,000 volunteers who had signed up to give back to their communities in another way. They can receive their volunteer jacket or donate it to a front-line worker.

___

The French Open will be held with fans when it starts in September.

The French Tennis Federation has written on Twitter that tickets will go on sale to the general public on July 16. The FFT did not give more information as to how many fans will be allowed at Roland Garros for the Sept. 27-Oct. Oct. 11 tournament.

The clay-court tournament had been scheduled to start on May 24. It then got postponed to Sept. 20 because of the coronavirus pandemic and then pushed back another week.

The FFT has prepared a health and safety protocol to ensure the safety of fans.

___

West Indies cricket coach Phil Simmons has mixed with his squad again in Manchester after passing his latest test for the coronavirus.

Simmons returned from his father-in-laws funeral last week and had been self-isolating in his hotel room at Old Trafford.

He had been watching the teams intrasquad match from his balcony but was allowed to interact with his players after passing a third consecutive virus test.

The first test against England starts on Wednesday.

___

The cancellation of the Wimbledon tennis tournament has led to a berry big boon for health care workers in London.

The All England Club says it will donate 200 portions of strawberries to workers on the front line of the coronavirus pandemic every day.

The club says more than 26,000 strawberries that would have been used for Wimbledon are being prepared by staff for delivery.

Wimbledon says it is a small gesture of appreciation for the dedicated service of the NHS during what would have been The Championships Fortnight.

Wimbledon was canceled this year for the first time since World War II because of the pandemic. The tournament had been scheduled to start on Monday.

The link between Wimbledon and strawberries is muddy but the main theory has to do with timing. Strawberry season in Britain just happens to coincide with the tennis tournament.

Cream is optional.

___

Novak Djokovic says he and his wife have now tested negative for the coronavirus.

The top-ranked player tested positive for the virus after playing in an exhibition series he organized in Serbia and Croatia with zero social distancing amid the pandemic.

His media team says Novak Djokovic and his wife Jelena are negative for COVID-19. That was shown by the results of the PCR tests that both had in Belgrade.

The statement says both had no symptoms and that they were in self-isolation in the Serbian capital since testing positive 10 days ago.

Djokovic was the fourth player to come down with the virus after participating in matches held in Belgrade and Zadar, Croatia. The others were three-time Grand Slam semifinalist Grigor Dimitrov, Borna Coric and Viktor Troicki.

___

Swiss soccer club St. Gallen says a player tested positive for coronavirus after visiting family in Serbia.

The Swiss league leaders say they allowed Boris Babi to make the two-week trip while recovering from a serious knee injury.

The 22-year-old forward tested positive upon his return. The club says he does not have symptoms and is in self-quarantine.

St. Gallen says Babi has not had contact with his teammates.

Attention on Serbias rising number of coronavirus cases followed Novak Djokovic and three other tennis players testing positive at a tournament he organized in Serbia and Croatia last month.

___

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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The Latest: USL's Indy Eleven to return with limited fans - Middletown Press


Jul 2

How to use the 6 dimensions of wellness to choose senior living – Reading Eagle

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can," wrote Danny Kaye, beloved Hollywood performer.

Kaye's advice certainly reflected his colorful career. It's true that the more one expands one's palette of experiences, the more vibrant life becomes.

As you evaluate senior living communities for the next step in your or a loved one's life journey, look for environments with an array of resources conducive to flourishing.

The National Wellness Institute defines Six Dimensions of Wellness physical, emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual and environmental which can serve as a guide to enrichment and growth.

Look for a community fostering physical wellness through excellent health care, nutrition and exercise. Confirm that each resident receives a care plan tailored to individual needs, and that services such as physical, occupational and speech therapy are available onsite. There should be ample access to state-of-the-art fitness equipment designed for older adults and daily group-led exercise programs.

The finest senior living communities offer healthful meals prepared from scratch by professional in-house chefs to meet residents' dietary needs. Look for a variety of dining venues, from casual bistros to formal restaurants with gourmet cuisine.

For example, Anthology Senior Living of Clayton View in St. Louis boasts chef Adam Shaw, former head chef for Ritz-Carlton. Anthology of The Plaza in Kansas City, Mo., chef Sam Hudging prepares happy hour appetizers highly enjoyed by residents, and his theme-inspired meals have delighted residents and families alike.

Emotional wellness means having a positive sense of self and feeling connected to others. Consider senior living communities whose staff and environment encourage connectedness.

Do compassionate care providers ensure that each care plan promotes independence? Are staff aware of individual care plans, so they have a holistic understanding of each resident?

Does the community provide opportunities for emotional development, such as intergenerational art therapy for individuals with memory loss, plus pet therapy and music therapy?

Another key to emotional wellness is a sense of fun. At Anthology of Louisville in Kentucky, management and staff lead by example. They turn Kentucky Derby day into a highlight of the year. And when many residents had birthdays the week the COVID-19 crisis hit, they organized a family parade of cars for a motorized birthday party.

Intellectual wellness is cultivated through stimulating mental activities and access to opportunities to expand and share knowledge and creativity. Look for a senior living option offering opportunities to expand residents' minds. Learning experiences like language courses, sewing classes and lectures by guest speakers should be listed in their calendar.

For social wellness, residents need to feel connected to family and community, with opportunities to enhance friendships. This has been severely challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic. Senior living communities nationwide have had to implement strict safety protocols such as in-room isolating, social distancing, use of personal protective equipment, screening and testing. Inquire if the community you are considering acted quickly to put programs in place to help residents maintain connectedness to loved ones.

Despite difficult circumstances, premium senior living communities still provide creative and engaging socially distanced activities to promote residents' mental and emotional wellness and use technology to help residents connect with loved ones.

"Our Socially Distanced Engagement Program provides residents with daily activities that focus on the mind, body and spirit to keep them mentally stimulated and physically active," says Anthology Senior Living president Benjamin Burke. "We continue to look at the best ways to keep lines of communication open, and we encourage residents and loved ones to stay connected through phone calls, video chats and email. The safety and well-being of our residents and team members is always our true north."

Spiritual wellness encompasses the need for meaning, as expressed in spiritual beliefs and practices. Look for senior living communities providing opportunities for spiritual growth, with spiritual gatherings such as non-denominational services, rosary prayer, hymn singing, devotionals and Shabbat celebrations.

Our feeling of wellness is profoundly affected by our environment. Look for a beautifully designed community with welcoming indoor and outdoor spaces. Seek sophisticated accommodations with spacious private suites and a variety of floor plans to meet individual preferences.

The best-designed communities offer well-appointed public spaces such as meeting rooms, landscaped courtyards and raised planters for resident gardening.

Keep these Six Dimensions of Wellness in mind as you research your or your loved ones' next home. All six dimensions should be interconnected, strengthening residents as individuals and the community as a whole. With many senior living options available, thoughtful evaluation will help you find a community that provides the enrichment and care needed for a flourishing lifestyle.

To learn more about independent living, assisted living and memory care, visit AnthologySeniorLiving.com.

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How to use the 6 dimensions of wellness to choose senior living - Reading Eagle


Jul 2

The Latest: USL’s Indy Eleven to return with limited fans – Alton Telegraph

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

A workout area sits idle in the concourse under the first base stands at Fenway Park, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Boston. The Boston Red Sox are scheduled resume training camp Friday at Fenway.

The Latest: USL's Indy Eleven to return with limited fans

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

___

The United Soccer Leagues Indy Eleven will return to action next Saturday with limited fans at Lucas Oil Stadium.

League officials announced a 263-game schedule that will be played over a 13-week span, leading to a 16-team playoff scheduled for October.

Indy also released a nearly 2,000-word document about changes that will be implemented at the stadium, home of the NFLs Indianapolis Colts, to protect those inside from COVID-19.

Changes include mandatory face coverings inside the stadium except when people are eating or drinking, limiting groups to four or fewer tickets, separating those groups with at least four empty seats and using a minimum of every other row to maintain social distancing.

Tailgating will not be permitted. Fans also will enter the stadium in staggered 15-minute shifts and will exit by row with those nearest the exits leaving first.

Each ticket holder also will be asked if theyve been in close contact with anyone who had a confirmed case of COVID-19 and if they are experiencing specific symptoms of the illness before they can undergo a temperature check. Anyone topping 100.4 degrees will not be admitted, though fans can request a recheck after a cooling down period.

Security checks will be conducted with walk-through magnetometers and ticket-scanning will be contactless. Concession lines will be marked with spots 6 feet apart, condiments will be served in single-serve packets, refills of food or beverages will not be allowed and most items will be served in sealed containers or wraps.

Players, referees and staff who are not competing on the field also will be required to wear face coverings. Flag bearers, player escorts and ball kids will not be used, and players will be discouraged from celebrating with hugs or high-fives.

Ten of Indys 15 remaining games will be played at Lucas Oil Stadium.

Indianapolis also will be hosting the first NHRA drag racing events next Saturday with limited fans in attendance.

___

The Boston Red Sox are getting ready to open their spring training reboot at Fenway Park.

On Thursday, a day before the team was scheduled to hold its first workouts, weights and exercise equipment were set up in the concourse to allow players to work out with more social distancing than the usual cramped facilities would allow.

Masked grounds crew members worked to get the field ready.

Baseball suspended spring training in March because of the coronavirus outbreak and delayed opening day. The players and owners agreed last month to try again, with teams reporting for workouts on Friday and the first games of a 60-game schedule to be played in empty ballparks on July 23 or 24.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker was at Fenway on Thursday to sign an order allowing the Red Sox to open the ballpark without fans as the state launches Phase 3 of its reopening plan.

___

New York Mets hitting coach Chili Davis will continue working remotely when the teams summer camp opens Friday.

The New York Post was first to report that the 60-year-old Davis wont be on site at Citi Field for the beginning of practices because of concerns about the coronavirus.

The timeline for him to join us is uncertain yet, new Mets manager Luis Rojas said on a video call Thursday.

The Post, citing anonymous sources in its report, said Davis does not have the virus.

Rojas said all other coaches and players have reported for intake screening. Assistant hitting coach Tom Slater will substitute on site for Davis, who lives in Arizona during the offseason.

I think were going to get the best of Chili whether hes with us at the start of camp or whether hes working remotely. I mean, were in constant communication. Chili and I practically talk every day and hes in communication with the coaches, Rojas said. So hes going to be helping us. Hes a great asset, hes got great knowledge, great experience. He helps the players with hitting, with playing the game. He helps the coaches as well with his view of the game. So he is going to be working remotely and were going to feel his presence.

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Boise State is cutting its baseball and womens swimming and diving programs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The program cuts, along with additional department and program operating reductions, will reduce the overall athletic budget by nearly $3 million.

This is one of the hardest decisions athletic departments have to make, but it comes at a time when we are facing the most serious financial challenge we have ever seen, Boise State athletic director Curt Apsey said in a statement Thursday.

The cut to baseball comes after the program was recently reinstated. The school announced in 2017 that baseball was being added after it had been discontinued following the 1980 season. The 2020 season was Boise States return, but the Broncos played only 14 games before the season was canceled.

The school said all scholarships for athletes in the affected programs, including incoming 2020 signings, will be honored.

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Finishers of the virtual Boston Marathon will receive their medals in an Amazon package instead of having a volunteer drape it around their necks on Boylston Street.

Race organizers announced plans for the event on Thursday. Runners will have from Sept. 7-14 to complete the 26.2-mile distance and submit proof. There is no time limit, but it must be completed in one continuous run.

Also included in the post-race package will be a participation shirt, a program, a bottle opener and other unspecified celebratory items.

The virtual race is open for those who had already registered for the real one, which was scheduled for April 20 and then put off until Sept. 14 before it was canceled. The cost to register for the virtual race is $50.

The Boston Athletic Association says it is encouraging the more than 10,000 volunteers who had signed up to give back to their communities in another way. They can receive their volunteer jacket or donate it to a front-line worker.

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The French Open will be held with fans when it starts in September.

The French Tennis Federation has written on Twitter that tickets will go on sale to the general public on July 16. The FFT did not give more information as to how many fans will be allowed at Roland Garros for the Sept. 27-Oct. Oct. 11 tournament.

The clay-court tournament had been scheduled to start on May 24. It then got postponed to Sept. 20 because of the coronavirus pandemic and then pushed back another week.

The FFT has prepared a health and safety protocol to ensure the safety of fans.

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West Indies cricket coach Phil Simmons has mixed with his squad again in Manchester after passing his latest test for the coronavirus.

Simmons returned from his father-in-laws funeral last week and had been self-isolating in his hotel room at Old Trafford.

He had been watching the teams intrasquad match from his balcony but was allowed to interact with his players after passing a third consecutive virus test.

The first test against England starts on Wednesday.

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The cancellation of the Wimbledon tennis tournament has led to a berry big boon for health care workers in London.

The All England Club says it will donate 200 portions of strawberries to workers on the front line of the coronavirus pandemic every day.

The club says more than 26,000 strawberries that would have been used for Wimbledon are being prepared by staff for delivery.

Wimbledon says it is a small gesture of appreciation for the dedicated service of the NHS during what would have been The Championships Fortnight.

Wimbledon was canceled this year for the first time since World War II because of the pandemic. The tournament had been scheduled to start on Monday.

The link between Wimbledon and strawberries is muddy but the main theory has to do with timing. Strawberry season in Britain just happens to coincide with the tennis tournament.

Cream is optional.

___

Novak Djokovic says he and his wife have now tested negative for the coronavirus.

The top-ranked player tested positive for the virus after playing in an exhibition series he organized in Serbia and Croatia with zero social distancing amid the pandemic.

His media team says Novak Djokovic and his wife Jelena are negative for COVID-19. That was shown by the results of the PCR tests that both had in Belgrade.

The statement says both had no symptoms and that they were in self-isolation in the Serbian capital since testing positive 10 days ago.

Djokovic was the fourth player to come down with the virus after participating in matches held in Belgrade and Zadar, Croatia. The others were three-time Grand Slam semifinalist Grigor Dimitrov, Borna Coric and Viktor Troicki.

___

Swiss soccer club St. Gallen says a player tested positive for coronavirus after visiting family in Serbia.

The Swiss league leaders say they allowed Boris Babi to make the two-week trip while recovering from a serious knee injury.

The 22-year-old forward tested positive upon his return. The club says he does not have symptoms and is in self-quarantine.

St. Gallen says Babi has not had contact with his teammates.

Attention on Serbias rising number of coronavirus cases followed Novak Djokovic and three other tennis players testing positive at a tournament he organized in Serbia and Croatia last month.

___

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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The Latest: USL's Indy Eleven to return with limited fans - Alton Telegraph


Jul 2

Stanford Chiropractic Center Wins 10th Consecutive Talk Award for Patient Satisfaction – PR.com

Palo Alto chiropractor Dr. Gavin Carr and his team received high marks again for patient satisfaction, earning them 10 straight Talk Awards.

Winners of the Talk Awards are based on The Stirling Center for Excellences independent, proprietary research and evaluation system, which identifies businesses with a track record of excellent customer service and satisfaction. The rating system combines data collected from nominations, online and other customer reviews, surveys, blogs, social networks, business-rating services, and other honors and accolades - all of which express the voice of the customer. Only those with a 4- or 5-star rating receive The Talk Award.

Family chiropractor Dr. Gavin Carr and the team at Stanford Chiropractic in Palo Alto believe in using chiropractic care to improve the health and wellness in all areas of patients' lives, whether they are having problems with back pain, neck pain, headaches or simply want to start feeling better when they wake up in the morning.

Dr. Carr has been serving the Bay Area for 30 years and takes care of patients of all ages, specializing in chiropractic adjustments. He has researched and developed some of the most advanced chiropractic techniques and adjustments, drawing patients from out of state and even out of the country on a regular basis.

Patient education is the practices primary focus. We pride ourselves on patient education, so our customers make educated and informed choices in choosing the right path to their health while being actively involved in the process, says Dr. Carr.

Excellent patient service at Stanford Chiropractic comes in the form of chiropractic health programs designed specifically for each patients individual needs. We provide a thorough consultation for every patient, says Office Manager Fernando Cruz. We teach our patients about the spine and how it relates to overall health and wellness. We also provide corrective exercise programs to help our patients achieve physical strength and boost their health.

In addition to serving patients, Dr. Carr is committed to serving the community. The practice participates in programs such as FaceBook Festivals, which raises funds for the local community; the City of Mountain View Festivals; and the City of Menlo Park Summer Fest. We educate the general public on all aspects of health while giving and donating services back to those in need, says Dr. Carr.

In addition to receiving 10 consecutive Talk Awards for outstanding patient satisfaction, Dr. Carr was voted Best Chiropractor for 2017 and 2018 in the Best of Palo Alto.

Stanford Chiropractic Center is located at 489 Middlefield Road in Palo Alto. For more information, call 650-326-7000 or go online to http://www.stanfordchiropractic.com. Visit the centers Talk Award Page at https://winner.thetalkawards.com/stanford-chiropractic-center.

About The Talk AwardsThe Talk Awards were created to calculate customer satisfaction ratings for a variety of businesses, based on customer feedback online, and help businesses gain control of their image and reputation by providing consumers a fair and unbiased overview of their business. For more information about The Talk Awards, call 877-712-4758 or go online to http://www.thetalkawards.com.

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Stanford Chiropractic Center Wins 10th Consecutive Talk Award for Patient Satisfaction - PR.com


Jul 2

And The Wall Between Church And State Continues To Crumble Under The Weight Of The High Courts Decision In Espinoza v. Montana Dep’t Of Revenue…

In a 5-4 decision by Chief Justice John Roberts, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled on June 30 that the no-aid to sectarian schools provision, in Article X, Section 6, of the Montana Constitution, which was used to strike down a scholarship program established by the Montana Legislature to provide tuition assistance to parents sending their children to private schools, violated the Free Exercise Clause of the Federal Constitution. The High Court, in applying strict scrutiny to the no-aid provision, stated: Montanas interest in creating greater separation of church and State than the Federal Constitution requires cannot qualify as compelling in the face of the infringement of free exercise here. Chief Justice Roberts reasoned that, because the Free Exercise Clause barred the no-aid provision in the Montana Constitution, the Montana Supreme Court could not use the no-aid provision to strike down the scholarship program in order to bar aid to schools controlled in whole or in part by churches. Chief Justice Roberts indicated that because the Judges in every State shall be bound by the Federal Constitution, and given the conflict between the Free Exercise Clause and the application of the no-aid provision, the Montana Supreme Court should have disregarded the no-aid provision in deciding the case below. In quoting the Courts decision in Trinity Lutheran, Chief Justice Roberts concluded that the supreme law of the land condemns discrimination against religious schools and the families whose children attend them, and their exclusion from the scholarship program here is odious to our Constitution and cannot stand. Thus, a state violates the Free Exercise Clause, when it discriminate[s] against schools based on the religious character of the school.

Justices Thomas, Alito, Gorsuch, and Kavanaugh joined in the opinion of the Court, while Justices Ginsburg, Kagan, Breyer, and Sotomayor dissented. Certain Justices also filed their own concurring or dissenting opinions. In her dissenting opinion, Justice Sotomayor stated: Todays ruling is perverse. Without any need or power to do so, the Court appears to require a State to reinstate a tax-credit program that the Constitution did not demand in the first place. Justice Sotomayor also indicated that, with todays ruling, the Court rejects the Religion Clauses balanced values in favor of a new theory of free exercise, and it does so only by setting aside well-established judicial constraints.

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And The Wall Between Church And State Continues To Crumble Under The Weight Of The High Courts Decision In Espinoza v. Montana Dep't Of Revenue...


Jul 1

Supervised Walking Program Improves Fitness and Quality of Life in Renal Patients – DocWire News

Physical exercise can improve symptoms, function, and mental health. However, many patients with renal disease do not meet physical activity guidelines. Exercise programs affiliated with hospitals may be able to reduce fears and improve exercise levels in that patient population. Leonora Chao, RD, and colleagues conducted a study to assess the effects of a 3-month supervised renal Nordic walking (NW) program on the fitness and quality of life of renal outpatients.

Results of the study were reported online during the NKF Spring Clinical Meetings. The presentation was titled Effects of a Renal Nordic Walking Program on Quality of Life and Fitness in Renal Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

The study included 30 participants 45 to 84 years of age. Patients were randomized to one of two groups: NW (n=15) or non-NW (n=15). The NW group was offered two supervised NW sessions per week; the non-NW group continued their usual activities.

Outcomes of interest were: weight, handgrip strength, 30-second sit-to-stand test (30-STS), 6-minute-walk test (6MWT), and Kidney Disease and Quality of Life questionnaire (KDQOL-36). Outcome measurements were taken at baseline and at 3-months. During the 3-month study period, daily steps were recorded using a Fitbit tracker. Using the intention-to-treat principle, the researchers calculated median changes in outcomes from baseline to 3 months between the two groups, and tested with a Brown-Mood median test.

Of the 30 participants, ten were kidney transplant recipients, 14 were pre-dialysis, three were receiving hemodialysis, and three were receiving peritoneal dialysis. Two patients in the non-NW group were lost to follow-up; missing data were minimal.

At 3 months, compared with the non-NW group, participants in the NW group had a median increase in body mass index (+0.3 kg/m2), handgrip strength (+2.1 kg), 30-STS (+1), 6MWT (+31.5 m), and several domains of the KDQOL-36 (effect of kidney disease; burden of kidney disease; and symptoms and problems). There were no significant differences in the median average daily steps between the two groups (NW, 7857 steps; non-NW, 8083 steps).

In summary, the researchers said, The NW group had greater improvements in handgrip strength (1.1 kg), KDQOL-36 scores, and exceeded the minimal clinically important difference of 14.0-30.5 m for 6MWT (41.5 m). Post-study comments from participants were consistent with perceptions of improvements in quality of life. A group-based supervised renal NW program may provide benefits to renal patients as part of their clinical care.

Source: Chao L, Neufeld S, Ngo V, et al. Effects of a renal Nordic walking program on quality of life and fitness in renal patients: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract of a presentation at the National Kidney Foundation 2020 Spring Clinical Meetings; abstract #228.

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Supervised Walking Program Improves Fitness and Quality of Life in Renal Patients - DocWire News


Jul 1

How to use the 6 dimensions of wellness to choose senior living – The Delaware County Daily Times

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can," wrote Danny Kaye, beloved Hollywood performer.

Kaye's advice certainly reflected his colorful career. It's true that the more one expands one's palette of experiences, the more vibrant life becomes.

As you evaluate senior living communities for the next step in your or a loved one's life journey, look for environments with an array of resources conducive to flourishing.

The National Wellness Institute defines Six Dimensions of Wellness physical, emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual and environmental which can serve as a guide to enrichment and growth.

Look for a community fostering physical wellness through excellent health care, nutrition and exercise. Confirm that each resident receives a care plan tailored to individual needs, and that services such as physical, occupational and speech therapy are available onsite. There should be ample access to state-of-the-art fitness equipment designed for older adults and daily group-led exercise programs.

The finest senior living communities offer healthful meals prepared from scratch by professional in-house chefs to meet residents' dietary needs. Look for a variety of dining venues, from casual bistros to formal restaurants with gourmet cuisine.

For example, Anthology Senior Living of Clayton View in St. Louis boasts chef Adam Shaw, former head chef for Ritz-Carlton. Anthology of The Plaza in Kansas City, Mo., chef Sam Hudging prepares happy hour appetizers highly enjoyed by residents, and his theme-inspired meals have delighted residents and families alike.

Emotional wellness means having a positive sense of self and feeling connected to others. Consider senior living communities whose staff and environment encourage connectedness.

Do compassionate care providers ensure that each care plan promotes independence? Are staff aware of individual care plans, so they have a holistic understanding of each resident?

Does the community provide opportunities for emotional development, such as intergenerational art therapy for individuals with memory loss, plus pet therapy and music therapy?

Another key to emotional wellness is a sense of fun. At Anthology of Louisville in Kentucky, management and staff lead by example. They turn Kentucky Derby day into a highlight of the year. And when many residents had birthdays the week the COVID-19 crisis hit, they organized a family parade of cars for a motorized birthday party.

Intellectual wellness is cultivated through stimulating mental activities and access to opportunities to expand and share knowledge and creativity. Look for a senior living option offering opportunities to expand residents' minds. Learning experiences like language courses, sewing classes and lectures by guest speakers should be listed in their calendar.

For social wellness, residents need to feel connected to family and community, with opportunities to enhance friendships. This has been severely challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic. Senior living communities nationwide have had to implement strict safety protocols such as in-room isolating, social distancing, use of personal protective equipment, screening and testing. Inquire if the community you are considering acted quickly to put programs in place to help residents maintain connectedness to loved ones.

Despite difficult circumstances, premium senior living communities still provide creative and engaging socially distanced activities to promote residents' mental and emotional wellness and use technology to help residents connect with loved ones.

"Our Socially Distanced Engagement Program provides residents with daily activities that focus on the mind, body and spirit to keep them mentally stimulated and physically active," says Anthology Senior Living president Benjamin Burke. "We continue to look at the best ways to keep lines of communication open, and we encourage residents and loved ones to stay connected through phone calls, video chats and email. The safety and well-being of our residents and team members is always our true north."

Spiritual wellness encompasses the need for meaning, as expressed in spiritual beliefs and practices. Look for senior living communities providing opportunities for spiritual growth, with spiritual gatherings such as non-denominational services, rosary prayer, hymn singing, devotionals and Shabbat celebrations.

Our feeling of wellness is profoundly affected by our environment. Look for a beautifully designed community with welcoming indoor and outdoor spaces. Seek sophisticated accommodations with spacious private suites and a variety of floor plans to meet individual preferences.

The best-designed communities offer well-appointed public spaces such as meeting rooms, landscaped courtyards and raised planters for resident gardening.

Keep these Six Dimensions of Wellness in mind as you research your or your loved ones' next home. All six dimensions should be interconnected, strengthening residents as individuals and the community as a whole. With many senior living options available, thoughtful evaluation will help you find a community that provides the enrichment and care needed for a flourishing lifestyle.

To learn more about independent living, assisted living and memory care, visit AnthologySeniorLiving.com.

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How to use the 6 dimensions of wellness to choose senior living - The Delaware County Daily Times



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