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May 15

5 Ways Eating Chickpeas Can Help You Lose Weight, Say Dietitians | Eat This Not That – Eat This, Not That

As if you needed a reason to eat more healthy foods like chickpeas, what if we told you that they play a key role in driving weight loss?

Sydney Lappe, MS, RDN, registered dietitian at bistroMD, says chickpeas pack many important vitamins and minerals, including B vitamins, iron, phosphorus, and magnesium. Versatile and easy to munch on, you can include this legume in an appetizer or as a focal part of your meal.

Below, Lappe and Sydney Greene, MS, RD, and member of our Eat This, Not That Medical Expert Board share all of the ways that chickpeas can help keep you full while also helping you lose weight in a healthy and sustainable way. After, be sure to read up on our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.

As Greene notes, "one serving of chickpeas contains roughly 10 grams of blood sugar-regulating and hunger suppressing fiber, which is a critical nutrient in weight management."

More specifically, chickpeas contain soluble fiber, which contributes to healthy gut bacteria and may also help with weight maintenance, according to Lappe.

"While the connection is not entirely clear, some evidence shows people with a diverse gut microbiome have a lower risk of developing cravings and belly fat," she says.

Here are 5 Major Side Effects Of Not Getting Enough Fiber, Says Science.

Chickpeas offer a great source of protein, and eating a sufficient amount of this macronutrient is key to achieving weight loss, Lappe says.

"Protein helps regulate hunger and related hormones, leading to greater satiety and curbing cravings while also supporting lean muscle and an efficient metabolism," she adds.

Lappe also emphasizes that protein has a higher "thermic effect" compared to carbs and fat, meaning the body burns more calories digesting protein than it does with these other two macronutrients.

It's possible that eating plant-based protein found in foods like chickpeas, quinoa, and soybeans for lunch may help prevent midday snack cravings and keep you full until dinner.

"Some studies show beans and legumes rich in plant-based protein promote greater satiety compared to animal proteins like pork and veal," Lappe says.

After eating crackers or carrots with hummus, you may notice that you feel quite satisfied in spite of the fact that it's a low-calorie snack. Aside from the satiating effects that come from both the protein and the fiber content, chickpeas also contain amylose, a resistant starch that the body digests slowly. This can especially help people with diabetes lose weight because the starch works to prevent sudden spikes in blood sugar levels, Lappe says.

If you're just eating a bowl of leafy greens for lunch, chances are you're going to be hungry within two hours of eating. Since chickpeas offer protein and fiber, they add bulk to your meal without costing you a bunch of calories.

"High-fiber foods are shown to improve lipid levels and offer a feeling of being full while simultaneously delaying the digestion process," Lappe says.

Bottom line, this legume is not only friendly for your budget, but it can also be included in an array of dishesfrom stews to rice dishes.

"Including chickpeas in a balanced diet can help manage weight, control blood sugars, improve blood lipids, among the many benefits," Lappe adds.

For more, be sure to check outWhat Happens To Your Body When You Eat Chickpeas.

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5 Ways Eating Chickpeas Can Help You Lose Weight, Say Dietitians | Eat This Not That - Eat This, Not That


May 15

5 benefits of drinking water in the morning – Medical News Today

Drinking water is very important for many bodily processes. These include transporting nutrients to cells, regulating the bodys temperature, and lubricating the joints.

If a person replaces their usual morning drink with water, it could provide them with several associated health benefits of increased water consumption.

This article explores what these benefits may be and how much scientific evidence there is for each one.

It will also discuss different ways to flavor water and if there are any risks to drinking water.

Some people believe that drinking water in the morning can aid in weight loss.

For example, a 2019 study found that higher fluid intake had links with improved body composition in young adults.

An older study from 2010 found that middle-aged and older adults lost more weight when they drank 500 milliliters (ml) of water before each meal over 12 weeks.

Researchers partly attributed this weight loss to the decrease in energy intake from meals among the participants who drank water. This means they ate less food than individuals who did not partake in water before meals.

Thermogenesis is the production of heat. When a person drinks cold water, thermogenesis occurs to warm up the water entering the body, which burns calories.

An older study from 2013 involved the water intake of 50 girls, with a body mass index of 25 to 29.9, along with a nutritious diet. It found that their body weight had decreased after they increased their water intake to 500 ml, three times a day, for 8 weeks. Participants drank the water before breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Researchers attributed the weight loss to water-induced thermogenesis.

However, these studies cannot definitively claim that only the water intake led to the weight loss.

Additionally, the results do not necessarily mean that drinking water specifically in the morning offers weight loss effects.

Learn 9 scientific ways to lose weight here.

Water can have an impact on cognition and mental performance even minor dehydration can have adverse effects on cognition, according to a 2016 study.

A 2019 review looked at the effect of hydration on cognitive performance. It found that there was a trend of improved mental performance in hydrated study participants. However, the researchers noted that the results were not statistically significant.

Additionally, participants in the study drank water throughout the day. This may suggest that hydration throughout the day may be necessary for better mental performance rather than just drinking water in the morning.

Another 2019 study on male college students found that dehydration had negative effects on short-term memory and attention. Short-term memory and attention improved once the participants rehydrated again.

Therefore, if a person wishes to increase their mental performance, specifically in the morning, drinking water may help.

Learn the 12 best brain foods here.

Drinking water may also have positive effects on a persons mood.

A 2014 study found that people who usually drank low volumes of water had better moods when they increased their water intake.

The same research found that when individuals who normally drank high volumes of water decreased their water intake, they experienced more thirst, decreased contentedness, and a reduction in calmness and positive emotions.

A 2019 study also found that dehydration negatively affected mood, while rehydration improved mood and fatigue symptoms.

With this in mind, a person may wish to drink water throughout the whole day to experience prolonged positive effects on their mood.

Learn 8 foods that can help boost serotonin here.

Some people believe that an increase in fluid intake can improve the appearance and health of the skin.

The skin contains about 30% water, which helps the skin remain plump, improving its elasticity and resilience.

An older study from 2015 found that increased water intake may have a positive effect on skin physiology it appeared more hydrated, especially in participants who usually drank less water.

A 2018 review found that increasing water intake may improve the hydration of the outer layer of the skin. However, the researchers noted that it was unclear whether this would benefit older adults.

However, even adequate skin hydration may not be sufficient to prevent wrinkles or offset the effects of the sun, genetics, or the environment.

Drinking water throughout the day may therefore help a person hydrate their skin, but they may not notice significant changes in its appearance.

Learn about dehydrated skin here.

Adequate water intake is also important in many body functions.

Learn how much water a person should drink each day.

Some potential risks of drinking water in the morning may involve:

Drinking water in the morning may offer some health benefits, especially if a person switches out an alternative morning drink for water.

However, many of the benefits of drinking water are not limited to just drinking it in the morning. It is essential that an individual stays hydrated throughout the day to ensure regular bodily function and minimize dehydration.

Flavored water options may be beneficial for people who may find it challenging to increase their water intake. The additional ingredients may also provide added health benefits with regular consumption.

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5 benefits of drinking water in the morning - Medical News Today


May 15

Why some people find it harder to lose weight than others – Stuff.co.nz

Why is it that some people can simply look at a salad and lose weight while others are stuck in a constant uphill battle?

Food and the human body is a complicated pairing, and there is no simple one-size-fits-all solution for a lifestyle hack. There are, however, several findings in recent studies which might explain why some people find it harder to lose weight than others.

And it turns out, gut bacteria in particular has a role to play in fat storage, making the traditional idea of eating less and exercising more a lot trickier for some.

On top of that, it seems some bodies are better at burning calories than others. The metabolic rate, which is the number of calories required to keep your body functioning at rest, is a process that works even when youre sleeping, and the energy your body doesnt use is stored as fat. So, the slower your metabolic rate, the fewer calories burned. The fewer calories burned, the more fat is stored.

READ MORE:* This scientist says nearly everything you know about food is wrong* Study of 200 countries highlight Kiwi kids among the unhealthiest in the world* There's more to weight-loss than calorie control * The real reason why you don't lose weight on the same diet as your friend

Men have more skeletal muscle mass than women and therefore a higher metabolic rate. Its understood that metabolism is partly genetic and yes, experts believe it does slow constantly from your early adult years onwards, due to inactivity and the size and metabolic function of our muscles.

Our bodies can react to the same foods in different ways, too. AUT Professor Emeritus Elaine Rush, an all-round nutrition expert, says we all have unique responses to food, based on how it is being metabolised.

The actual energy it takes to digest food, she explains, is called thermogenesis.

When food is consumed, energy is required to break it down into smaller bits and molecules chewing, swallowing, peristalsis, churning in the gut, producing digestive juices, enzymes and emulsifiers to get it small enough to pass into the blood stream and lymphatics.

She adds that overall thermogenesis accounts for about 10 per cent of total energy expenditure.

So if you consume 2000 kilo calories per day, youd spend around 200 kilo calories just to digest food. Some evidence suggests that obese humans might have defective diet-induced thermogenesis. Theres also a lot of interest in foods that might enhance this process and protein is a key one, said to play a key role by keeping you satisfied for longer.

Rush says another reason why only some people gain weight after consuming food with too many calories can depend on their microbiome and fibre intake. Made up of trillions of bacteria living in the gut, the microbiome plays an important role in human health and disease by producing a range of chemicals, hormones and vitamins.

Studies suggest that the hidden figures have a role to play in obesity, by influencing the bodys ability to extract and store calories.

Genes are often considered to predispose people to obesity, in tow with the amount of physical activity performed, types of foods eaten and what is available. Rush says that genetics can play some part in determining the diversity of the microbiome, but its not the end of the story.

A 2017 study investigating the association between gut microbiome and weight gain in twin females found that the environment has more influence than genetics and that microbiome diversity is negatively associated with long-term weight gain. The research also found the microbiome diversity was positively tied in with fibre intake.

Rush says diet "especially fibre, has a huge influence on microbiome.

Its a fermenter down there, its breaking the fibre down. We used to think fibre was an inert part of our diet and nothing much happened in the large bowel, but weve known for at least ten years that we get energy from fibre.

Other influences determining the diversity and stability of the microbiome can include age, stress, medication and even your birthing process. The understanding is that you can make choices to increase the diversity of your microbiome. We should also be cutting back on calories and avoiding processed foods.

STUFF

More than 20,000 people took part in Stuff's NowNext survey. Here's what we learned.

You are what you eat and your microbiome is too. Its cells number one-to-one for our cells so you cant ignore it, theres trillions of them there. It depends what you feed it, so its a bit like farming, youre not feeding yourself.

So is it impossible for some people to lose weight? Rush says that rather than focus on weight, it is better to focus on function.

Loss of weight is not the goal. It is the ability to live the best life possible which means to have good physical function. Focus on function and wellbeing. You can be malnourished at any size and I believe that most New Zealanders do have some degree of malnourishment because were certainly not eating our 5+ a day and now thats gone up to 7+ a day.

Dont try for a goal weight, but try for overall healthiness, including good nights sleep, balanced food, physical activity, enjoying society and lowering stress. she adds.

Individual diets could certainly be one solution, but the luxury of personalised nutrition is not accessible to everyone, which is another part of the problem.

One 2018 study looking at glucose response found varying blood sugar levels in participants that ate identical meals. So the effect that one food has for one person might be different for someone else a carrot doesnt necessarily digest like a carrot for everyone.

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Why some people find it harder to lose weight than others - Stuff.co.nz


May 15

Will weight loss have an effect on bone density? – Clinton Herald

DEAR DR. ROACH: Over the past year of pandemic lockdown, I have worked hard at reducing calories to lose weight and increasing my exercise on an elliptical trainer. I am 5 feet, 7 inches tall and age 70. I went from 202 pounds to 149.3. My weight goal is 145. My waistline is 25.5 inches. I have achieved a size 14 in clothing, which is what I wore in 2002. According to my digital scale, my BMI is now 23.4, and according to the BMI chart, I am now in the good healthy weight range.

Also, in May 2019 I had total knee replacement surgery and believe that reducing my weight would be beneficial to my hips, knees, ankles and feet. Because of my continued physical therapy exercise, as well as losing the extra pounds, I feel steadier on my feet than I have felt in years.

I recently read that older adults have a [BMI] of between 25 and 27, not under 25, or they run the risk of osteoporosis. My last bone density scan showed that I had significant improvement of my bone density, and I would think that with all this walking on the elliptical trainer (30-60 minutes daily), it will prove to be at least as good. In addition, I do some exercises with small hand weights. I have no reason to think I am amongst the 24% of older women who have osteoporosis of the spine, etc.

Should I be content with a weight of 149? Should I gain back some fat? P.R.

ANSWER: I think healthy diet and regular exercise are much more important than the weight or BMI, at least for people who are not very obese. It is true that carrying some extra weight protects to some extent against osteoporosis, and very thin women are at higher risk. However, I am so impressed with your activity and accomplishments over the past year that I would recommend you continue your exercise and let your weight stay where it is. You should continue to get bone density scans as recommended, but you are quite right that regular weight-bearing exercise is particularly good at maintaining bone health, along with a diet including adequate calcium and ensuring good vitamin D if you are at risk for low vitamin D.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am a 58-year-old male. I had COVID and was given monoclonal antibody treatment as an outpatient two months ago. I recovered from COVID with mild to moderate symptoms. How do I determine if I am protected from getting COVID again? Id like to know if I should get a vaccine and if so when I should get it. J.D.

ANSWER: Even people who have had COVID-19 may get the disease again, so they do benefit from the vaccine. However, because of the monoclonal antibody you got, it is recommended you wait 90 days from the monoclonal antibody treatment to vaccine administration. You should be able to take the vaccine in about another month.

There is some partial immunity that comes from getting the disease, and you are at low risk for 90 days after infection. It appears that the vaccine adds benefit, and I would recommend the vaccine.

We are making critical coverage of the coronavirus available for free. Please consider subscribing so we can continue to bring you the latest news and information on this developing story.

We are making critical coverage of the coronavirus available for free. Please consider subscribing so we can continue to bring you the latest news and information on this developing story.

Dr. Keith Roach is a syndicated columnist.

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Will weight loss have an effect on bone density? - Clinton Herald


May 15

To your good health: Will weight loss have an effect on bone density? – Lock Haven Express

DEAR DR. ROACH: Over the past year of pandemic lockdown, I have worked hard at reducing calories to lose weight and increasing my exercise on an elliptical trainer. I am 5 feet, 7 inches tall and age 70. I went from 202 pounds to 149.3. My weight goal is 145. My waistline is 25.5 inches. I have achieved a size 14 in clothing, which is what I wore in 2002. According to my digital scale, my BMI is now 23.4, and according to the BMI chart, I am now in the good healthy weight range.

Also, in May 2019 I had total knee replacement surgery and believe that reducing my weight would be beneficial to my hips, knees, ankles and feet. Because of my continued physical therapy exercise, as well as losing the extra pounds, I feel steadier on my feet than I have felt in years.

I recently read that older adults have a [BMI] of between 25 and 27, not under 25, or they run the risk of osteoporosis. My last bone density scan showed that I had significant improvement of my bone density, and I would think that with all this walking on the elliptical trainer (30-60 minutes daily), it will prove to be at least as good. In addition, I do some exercises with small hand weights. I have no reason to think I am amongst the 24% of older women who have osteoporosis of the spine, etc.

Should I be content with a weight of 149? Should I gain back some fat? P.R.

ANSWER: I think healthy diet and regular exercise are much more important than the weight or BMI, at least for people who are not very obese. It is true that carrying some extra weight protects to some extent against osteoporosis, and very thin women are at higher risk. However, I am so impressed with your activity and accomplishments over the past year that I would recommend you continue your exercise and let your weight stay where it is. You should continue to get bone density scans as recommended, but you are quite right that regular weight-bearing exercise is particularly good at maintaining bone health, along with a diet including adequate calcium and ensuring good vitamin D if you are at risk for low vitamin D.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am a 58-year-old male. I had COVID and was given monoclonal antibody treatment as an outpatient two months ago. I recovered from COVID with mild to moderate symptoms. How do I determine if I am protected from getting COVID again? Id like to know if I should get a vaccine and if so when I should get it. J.D.

ANSWER: Even people who have had COVID-19 may get the disease again, so they do benefit from the vaccine. However, because of the monoclonal antibody you got, it is recommended you wait 90 days from the monoclonal antibody treatment to vaccine administration. You should be able to take the vaccine in about another month.

There is some partial immunity that comes from getting the disease, and you are at low risk for 90 days after infection. It appears that the vaccine adds benefit, and I would recommend the vaccine.

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To your good health: Will weight loss have an effect on bone density? - Lock Haven Express


May 15

Your body is wired to regain weight, there may be ways to change that – Insider

Regaining weight is not dependent on willpower, but biology, according to a top Australian obesity doctor and researcher.

Dr. Nick Fuller told Insider that the extreme way most people dietmakes bodies more inclined to return to their starting weight afterwards.

"Dieting and weight loss is seen as a huge stress on the body, and the body works to eliminate that stress by shutting down and resultingly, ensuring you climb back to your starting weight," he said.

When we try to lose weight, our bodies resist and a number of physiological changes occur, Fuller said. For example, our thyroid shuts down, metabolism slows, and our appetite hormones tell us to eat more.

This biological response stems from our hunter-gatherer ancestors whose bodies adapted to periods of deprivation when food was scarce and held on to fat, which is known as metabolic adaptation.

A person's starting weight can be thought of as their set point weight, which is the weight you remember being for a long period of time in your adult life, according to Fuller, who is based at the University of Sydney.

Evidence suggests that each person's set point is a range, and some people's set point weight will naturally be higher than others.

According to Carol Harrison, Senior Exercise Physiologist at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the body will defend itself to stay within a few pounds.

"The set point is established over a long period of time. It's a very complex thing, but it appears that it is your body's attempt to regulate itself, and that attempt results in a certain weight," Harrison said.

If you're trying to lose weight but feel hopeless about your set point, you don't have to give up you can change it with slow dieting, Fuller said.

His weight loss philosophy, Interval Weight Loss, entails alternating between a month of weight loss (aiming to lose 2kg or 4.4lbs) and a month of maintenance, meaning a person would lose 12kg or 26.5lbs over a year.

A post shared by INTERVAL WEIGHT LOSS (@intervalweightloss)

The weight loss months involve eating five times a day, one "treat food" (such as cake) and one meal out each week, 30 minutes of exercise (of varying intensities) six days a week, sleeping 6-8 hours a night, and three TV-free days a week (with no more than two hours of TV on the other four days).

The maintenance months are largely similar except with two meals out and two "treat foods" each week, one fewer workout (which can be lower intensity), and one more day of TV.

Losing weight in four-week cycles means your body doesn't fight itself and regain doesn't occur, Fuller said.

"The weight maintenance months allow your body the rest it needs and prevents the physiological responses that come with diets and weight loss programs," he said.

Once you get to your goal weight, you stick to the maintenance guidelines forever.

Fuller maintains that no conventional diet regime addresses a person's set point which is why people regain afterwards, but this may not be wholly true.

According to MD Anderson Senior Exercise Physiologist Carol Harrison, there are two key factors to bear in mind when dieting if you want to change your set point: losing weight slowly so your body can adjust, as Fuller recommends, but also getting support from a dietitian or therapist along your journey so you can be aware of your cravings and how your body is reacting.

Simply eating less and moving more, without taking your time and also working on your mindset, will not lead to lasting weight loss, Harrison said.

But more drastic weight loss methods may lower weight set point.

Although only limited research exists, there is evidence (such as this 2016 study on rodents by Louisiana State University) to suggest that weight loss surgery, such as a gastric bypass, can change a person's weight set point.

According to board-certified, fellowship-trained bariatric surgeon Dr. David Oliak, weight loss surgery doesn't lead to the same natural resistance that comes with dieting, such as increased hunger and decreased metabolism.

And Fuller agrees: " Bariatric surgery can alter the appetite wiring system and prevent the increase in appetite that comes with dieting because the anatomy of the gut is altered, which, for example, then reduces the amount of ghrelin produced by the stomach (ghrelin tells us to eat more)."

Dr. Spencer Nadolsky, an obesity specialist, said the notion that bariatric surgery lowers or resets a person's set point is still a hypothesis.

"One may not see the metabolic adaptations seen in just diet and exercise as you see with surgery," he told Insider.

"However, the biggest physiological driver to weight regain is appetite, which bariatric surgery deals with. Whether it actually resets one's set point or not, it's a very powerful tool that combats that appetite driver."

Fuller's Interval Weight Loss plan is a long game approach, and he believes weight loss should not be considered successful until a person has kept it off for five years.

The trouble is that people want big results fast.

"We have been doing the same thing for decades and all it has done is contribute to the very problem it proclaims to solve dieting has accelerated the obesity epidemic," Fuller said. "If dieting worked we wouldn't see people signing up to the same diets and same weight loss programs repeatedly every year."

Fuller believes the issue with conventional dieting is that it doesn't address set point, and he said many diets are unsustainable and can also cause both mental and physical damage.

"People need to be educated on why they are failing on their weight loss attempts from people who know what they are talking about and what they can do to restore control of their health and weight," Fuller said.

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Your body is wired to regain weight, there may be ways to change that - Insider


May 15

Healthy Snack Foods Dietitians Say You Should Be Eating | Eat This Not That – Eat This, Not That

Yes, you should eat snacks. Despite popular dieting beliefs, eating a snack can be a great way to enhance your overall health goals and help you maintain or even lose weight. How is that possible? By treating your snack like a small meal rather than mindlessly snacking on a bowl of chips, you'll get more satisfaction from your snack that will keep you feeling full until your next main meal.

"Snacks are an important part of a healthy, varied diet," says Sarah Schlichter, MPH, RDN of Bucket List Tummy. "Firstly, they help bridge the gap between meals and allow individuals to not go too long without eating, which can help with energy levels, balancing blood sugar, cravings, and prevent overeating at meals. Snacks are also a great opportunity to add in extra nutrients that may be lacking in meals."

It's all about choosing the right type of snack to enjoy. Ensuring that your snack contains the main elements of a meal that help you feeling fullprotein, fiber, and fatyour body will feel nourished and satisfied, and you won't feel the need to reach for the chip bag while you're cooking dinner.

We spoke with a few registered dietitians to determine some healthy snack foods to stock up on for moments when you're starting to feel hungry. Here are the snacks they recommendand for even more meal ideas, be sure to check out our list of 100 Easiest Recipes You Can Make.

"Low sugar, high protein yogurt with a drizzle of honey makes for a good snack because of the protein and beneficial probiotics found in the yogurt," says Maggie Michalczyk, RDN from Once Upon a Pumpkin. "The protein will help you feel fuller for longer and the probiotics are beneficial bacteria that our gut needs for optimal health. I recommend topping your yogurt with honey for an even more gut-friendly and delicious snack because honey may function as prebiotics, which is essentially food for the good bacteria (aka probiotics in the gut)."

Speaking of the gut, here's The Best Way to Eat for Your Microbiome and Improve Gut Health.

"Fruit contains fiber plus beneficial vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants," Michalczyk says. "Pairing it with unsweetened nut butter can help make this snack more satiating thanks to the healthy fat and protein in the nut butter. Most fruits and nut butter can be very portable, which is great for taking on the go. My favorite combinations include blueberries and almond butter or banana and peanut butter."

RELATED: Peanut Butter vs Almond Butter: What is Healthier For You?

"In terms of snacks, I like those with heart-healthy fat, protein, and fiber. Trail mix is one of my favorites," Jinan Banna, PhD, RDsays. "I often feel like something sweet as a snack, but I choose sweet snacks with fiber and other nutrients to keep me full."

Make it yourself with ourQuick and Easy Macadamia Nut and Pepita Trail Mix Recipe!

"Hummus is the perfect snack, as it contains protein and fiber as well as vitamins and minerals. There are so many ways I enjoy it," Lisa Young, PhD, RDN says. "I love hummus and whole-grain crackers, or hummus and red peppers or carrots, and roasted chickpeas."

Not a fan of hummus? Roasted chickpeas could be the answer!

"Chickpeas are a good source of plant-based protein and fibertwo things important for satiety," Michalczyk says. "Roasting gives them a nice crunch, and you can season them with nearly any combination of spice for a good flavor. Another plus is that chickpeas are very budget-friendly and available at nearly every grocery store. Drain and dry the chickpeas well before roasting at 400 degrees for 25 minutes with avocado oil and spice of your choice."

"[A] chia pudding snack has less than 200 calories," says Shannon Henry, RD from EZCare Clinic. "Chia seeds are full of fiber and can be added in all types of diets as well, as they are high in antioxidants that help to reduce inflammation and improve heart health."

Prep a few jars of chia pudding by using our Customizable Overnight Chia Pudding. Top with nuts and fruit to give it some extra flavor!

"Nuts and seeds are full of healthy fats and fiber that help keep you full for longer," Young says. "Adding nuts and seeds to your diet is a great way to boost your intake of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids (walnuts, flax seeds) that can benefit the heart, brain, and skin. They also contain the antioxidant vitamin E."

"Energy bites make the perfect grab-and-go snack," says Mackenzie Burgess, RDN, and recipe developer at Cheerful Choices. "I love how they provide a healthy balance of fiber and plant-based protein to provide long-lasting energy. Skip the store-bought stuff and make your own customizable bites. Add rolled oats alongside nut butter and add-ins of your choice like mini chocolate chips, raisins, or coconut flakes."

"Dark chocolate is a great option for [a] snack," Henry says. "It contains flavanols compounds that can reduce blood pressure and prevent heart diseases."

While dark chocolate can be a delicious (and nutritious) treat to have, without other elements to your snack, it won't feel as filling. You can easily turn this sweet treat into a snack by pairing it with something else, such as these Dark Chocolate Dipped Bananas or Dark Chocolate-Covered Almond Clusters.

"The key to a good snack is having a high fiber carbohydrate and protein to give you energy and help keep your blood sugar steady," says Amy Goodson, MS, RD, CSSD, LD, author of The Sports Nutrition Playbook. "Some of the best snack examples are cheese and whole-grain crackers, Greek yogurt and fruit, and peanut butter on whole-grain bread. All are satisfying, blood sugar-stabilizing, and nourishing. If you are looking for an all-in snack on the go, go with almonds or pistachios. High in fiber and protein, they are a snack in one."

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Healthy Snack Foods Dietitians Say You Should Be Eating | Eat This Not That - Eat This, Not That


May 15

This Liverpool PT has helped thousands of people lose weight through her online business – The Guide Liverpool

13/05/2021

As an award-winning fitness professional, who was voted Best Female Personal Trainer in 2018 and Best Online Coach 2020 by Pro Fit Awards, Aimee has been able to take that expertise and make it work for her latest venture.

She created her own targeted fitness and weight loss programme 8 Week With Aimee in January 2019 and found that the closure of traditional fitness venues really increased demand for alternative regimes, and so she was able to use her five years of experience to really grow her brand and business online. Since then, this industrious 29-year-old has enjoyed great success, which to her means seeing the life-changing results achieved by those taking part.

Aimee, from South Liverpool, has already helped thousands of women improve their lifestyles and is keen to stress that her two-month regime is not just based around reducing body fat and increasing fitness levels. In fact, it has its own self-love message to educate and empower women to become the best versions of themselves through the best nutrition, achievable exercise goals and a positive mindset around not just body acceptance, but one which can reap benefits in all areas of her clients lives, too.

8 Weeks With Aimee has been a huge success as women have found that working out from home as well as in the gym, or outdoors, fits in with their busy schedules, and that having the support, advice and content created by Aimee is a truly integrative experience. The online programme has even meant Aimee has now built a studio in her garden at home so she can film, blog and run all her classes daily.

However, at a time when young women do feel under increasing pressure to only concentrate on their outward appearance, Aimee has been keen to ensure that clients get the best results, in terms of their overall well-being, when they feel part of a group, are supported by Aimee and her team, and by each other.

8 Weeks With Aimee provides a safe, exclusive space in their closed Facebook group for women of all ages taking part to connect, talk, share experiences and offer encouragement. As well as the online content of the programme, Aimee offers online group interaction and in-person activities, which will hopefully flourish as restrictions ease.

The past eighteen months have really given me a chance to consolidate my skills and launch something which I am really proud of, because I applaud everyone who has taken part and given the programme their all.

Personally, I was so keen to leave behind fad diets, and limiting self-beliefs and wanted my 8 Week challenge to be all-encompassing for women, so that they could not only set and achieve goals in terms of fitness and nutrition, but also to improve confidence and enjoy additional benefits such as improved sleep, and reduced anxiety. During Mental Health Awareness Week it is so important to discuss how valuable not just activity, but being a part of a group effort, really boosts our mood levels.

I have now created a team, including fitness pros, and an experienced chef, to join me as my business expands. We feel so much joy when we see the journeys of everyone who joins us as they come to life, through their own progress images and words they send back to us.

Aimees next challenge sign-up is being launched on 17th May 2021 at 7pm, and as 400 happy clients completed the last programme, Aimee and her team are looking forward to welcoming a new intake of clients who want to commit to getting fit, eating nutritious meals and also becoming part of a supportive, uplifting community, making not only life changes but also new friends who will remain when their own, individual 8 weeks is up.

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This Liverpool PT has helped thousands of people lose weight through her online business - The Guide Liverpool


Apr 4

Low calorie snacks: What they are, are they good? – Medical News Today

Healthy snacks can contribute important nutrients to the diet. Snacking on low calorie foods may reduce the overall intake of calories if it keeps a person from impulsively opting for high calorie meals.

Reducing the overall intake of calories can be a goal for people looking to lose weight. It may also be a goal for people working to maintain a moderate weight.

Snacking can help promote weight loss, as long as a person chooses their snacks selectively and eats them in moderation.

This article discusses snacking and its relationship to weight. It also provides recipes for 20 tasty low calorie snacks.

Some research indicates that almost one-third of a persons daily calorie intake comes from snacks.

There is no standard definition of snacking, but most people understand snacks to be foods, and sometimes drinks, consumed between meals. The term snack does not refer to the healthiness of a food.

People may snack for many reasons, including:

Some of these factors may also influence the type of snack a person chooses. For example, some research indicates that social norms that support healthy eating may increase a persons intake of nutritious snacks.

Snacking can lead to weight gain or loss, depending on the type of snacks and snacking habits.

When judging whether a snack is healthy, it is important to distinguish between nutrient-dense and calorie-dense foods.

The latter are high in calories and generally high in sugar and fats. What people call junk foods are calorie-dense and tend to have few nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and fiber. A person should eat these foods infrequently, especially if they have diabetes.

Nutrient-dense foods, meanwhile, tend to be much healthier. Snacking on these may help a person feel fuller for longer and reduce overeating at mealtimes, if this is a concern.

Several studies report that foods rich in protein, fiber, and whole grains enhance satiety, the feeling of being full. In this way, they may help with weight management. Some examples of snacks in this category include nuts, yogurt, and popcorn.

It is important to snack in moderation. Checking food labels to learn about portion sizes and calorie contents can help.

The MyPlate online tool from the Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides a range of nutritious recipes, including many for healthy snacks.

A piece or handful of fruit can be a convenient, healthy snack most fruits are low in calories and high in fiber. All fruits contain a variety of essential vitamins and minerals.

A 2019 review found that eating more fruit supported subsequent weight loss. Research also suggests that most fruits have anti-obesity effects.

Some people choose to get more than 70% of their daily calories from raw fruits, mainly, along with some seeds, nuts, and vegetables. But this diet, called a fruitarian diet, excludes many important food groups and generally does not include enough essential nutrients.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 20202025 recommend that people consume 2 cups of fruit a day, as part of a balanced diet.

The following healthy snacks each contain 100 calories or fewer and a range of nutrients.

The calorie counts come from FoodData Central, another searchable online tool from the USDA. A person can visit FoodData Central to check how many calories and nutrients are in specific servings of many different foods.

Snacking on fruit may help curb sugar cravings, boost the daily fiber intake, and provide essential vitamins and minerals.

A person might enjoy:

Try spreading a half-tablespoon of peanut butter (48 calories) over slices of half a medium apple (52 calories) for a tasty snack that includes fiber, protein, and healthy fats.

Cut half a raw carrot (12 calories) and one-third of a medium cucumber (10 calories) into sticks, and dip them in 2 tablespoons of hummus (78 calories).

Top 1 crispbread (37 calories) with a chopped plum tomato (11 calories) and 15 grams (g) of shredded, reduced fat cheddar cheese (47 calories).

Grill the crispbread until the cheese is bubbling and, if desired, top it with some chopped green onion.

About 17 green olives (68 g) make up a snack with fewer than 100 calories.

For a cooling treat, try these homemade orange and pear popsicles. Blend the fruit, pour it into molds, and freeze it overnight. Each fat-free popsicle contains 72 calories.

Popcorn can be low in calories if is air-popped or made in a silicone microwave popper. It is also rich in fiber.

Three cups of plain, air-popped popcorn contain just over 90 calories. Some ideas for low calorie toppings include:

Divide 50 g of smoked salmon (59 calories) into four strips. Spread each strip with 5 g of reduced fat cream cheese (39 calories).

Sprinkle these with dill, if preferred, then roll up each strip and enjoy.

Nuts can make a filling snack that is easy to eat on the go. They contain protein, fiber, and healthy fats.

The following portions of unroasted, unsalted nuts contain 100 calories or fewer:

Mix 14 g of dark chocolate chips (60 calories) with 5 plain almonds (35 calories) to make a satisfying, low calorie trail mix.

Air-fryer sweet potato fries topped with salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and cinnamon can be a delicious low calorie snack. Twelve fries contain approximately 84 calories.

Find the recipe here.

Spread 1 tablespoon of almond butter (98 calories) on three celery sticks (2 calories). Try topping these with a sprinkling of cinnamon.

Place a slice of turkey (30 calories) on a plate or cutting board. Spread it with a tablespoon of hummus (39 calories) and add a 15-g slice of avocado (24 calories). Roll it up and enjoy.

Take a half-cup of canned tuna chunks packed in water and drained (70 calories), and mix it with 1 teaspoon of reduced fat mayonnaise (17 calories) and two chopped cherry tomatoes (6 calories).

Spoon the mixture into 2 lettuce leaves (2 calories) and roll these into wraps.

Poach or boil an egg (72 calories) and serve it with four lightly steamed asparagus spears (13 calories) seasoned with black pepper and 1 tsp of grated Parmesan cheese (9 calories).

Top 100 g of nonfat Greek yogurt (61 calories) with one-third of a cup of blueberries (29 calories).

Toss one-third of a cup of cooked edamame (75 calories) in a dry skillet containing chili powder, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt. Enjoy these warm or cool.

Mix 1 tablespoon of chia seeds (60 calories) with a quarter-cup of unsweetened almond milk (10 calories), a teaspoon of maple syrup (18 calories), and a half-teaspoon of vanilla extract (6 calories).

Refrigerate the mixture for at least 4 hours, but preferably overnight, before eating.

Blend 1 cup of unsweetened almond milk (39 calories) with half a large banana (61 calories). Some people might also add a few ice cubes.

To make a low calorie soup, add chopped vegetables to a pot of chicken or vegetable stock and cook the mixture until the vegetables are tender. A person can blend the soup until it is smooth, if they prefer.

Healthy snacks can contribute nutrients to the diet, and snacking on healthy foods that are high in fiber, protein, or both and relatively low in calories may help with weight management.

Overall, it is better to limit the intake of snacks that contain refined carbohydrates, added sugar, and harmful fats.

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Low calorie snacks: What they are, are they good? - Medical News Today


Apr 4

Ask the Doc: ‘I want to shed some weight’ – Inverness Courier

There are healthy ways to lose weight gradually.

Dr Laura Ryan answers your health questions.

Q. Ive gained some weight during lockdown and feel a little uncomfortable. Id like to lose a little weight but Im lacking in motivation. Where do I start?

A. If youre keen to lose small amounts of weight safely, the best approach is to make small changes. Eat three regular, balanced meals a day and try to have meals at planned times. Only include snacks if youre physically hungry. Meal planning is very helpful when losing weight, as well as substituting high-calorie food for healthier alternatives:

Instead of crisps and dips grab crunchy peppers and carrots and dip them in some low-fat hummus.

Swap your chocolate bar for a handful of unsalted nuts. Switch your high-calorie coffee for a lower calorie Americano.

NHS Inform features a 12-week weight management programme which includes tools to measure your targets, recipe ideas, food diaries, and other tools to keep you motivated. Its free to register and is a great way to keep yourself accountable and make sure you stick to your goals. Visit http://www.nhsinform.scot/healthy-living/12-week-weight-management-programme for details.

Q. I am a mother to two young women, one in her 20s and the other in her teens, and I myself am facing the menopause. We each seem to be facing different womens issues is there a resource that we can all visit for info on things like contraceptives, period issues, etc?

A. The different stages in a womans life present varying health challenges. NHS inform has lots of resources to help you at all stages of life, whether youre looking for advice, information, local support, or ideas for improving your wellbeing.

Visit http://www.nhsinform.scot/campaigns/womens-health for a list of lots of common issues, information on symptoms, and what to do next.

Related news: Ask the Doc: 'Why are my fingers sore?'

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Ask the Doc: 'I want to shed some weight' - Inverness Courier



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