Search Weight Loss Topics:


Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»


Jun 13

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Overview and Outlook Report by 2026 – Weekly Wall

Testosterone Replacement Therapy

In a recent study published by QY Research, titled Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy MarketResearch Report, analysts offer an in-depth analysis of the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market. The study analyzes the various aspects of the market by studying its historic and forecast data. The research report provides a Porters five force model, SWOT analysis, and PESTEL analysis of the Testosterone Replacement Therapy market. The different areas covered in the report are Testosterone Replacement Therapy market size, drivers and restraints, segment analysis, geographic outlook, major manufacturers in the market, competitive landscape, value/volume data, marketing strategies, and expert views

Major Key Player operating in this report are: AbbVie, Endo International, Eli lilly, Pfizer, Actavis (Allergan), Bayer, Novartis, Teva, Mylan, Upsher-Smith, Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Kyowa Kirin, Acerus Pharmaceuticals

Get PDF Sample Copy of the Report to understand the structure of the complete report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) :

https://www.qyresearch.com/sample-form/form/1433485/global-testosterone-replacement-therapy-market

Segmental Analysis

The report has classified the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy industry into segments including product type and application. Every segment is evaluated based on growth rate and share. Besides, the analysts have studied the potential regions that may prove rewarding for the Testosterone Replacement Therapy manufacturers in the coming years. The regional analysis includes reliable predictions on value and volume, thereby helping market players to gain deep insights into the overall Testosterone Replacement Therapy industry.

Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Segment By Type:

, Gels, Injections, Patches, Other

Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Segment By Application:

, Hospitals, Clinics, Others Key Players: The Key manufacturers that are operating in the

In terms of region, this research report covers almost all the major regions across the globe such as North America, Europe, South America, the Middle East, and Africa, and the Asia Pacific. Europe and North America regions are anticipated to show an upward growth in the years to come. While Testosterone Replacement Therapy market in Asia Pacific regions is likely to show remarkable growth during the forecasted period. Cutting edge technology and innovations are the most important traits of the North America region and thats the reason most of the time the US dominates the global markets. The keyword market in the South, America region is also expected to grow in the near future.

Competitive Landscape

It is important for every market participant to be familiar with the competitive scenario in the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy industry. In order to fulfil the requirements, the industry analysts have evaluated the strategic activities of the competitors to help the key players strengthen their foothold in the market and increase their competitiveness.

Key companies operating in the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market include: AbbVie, Endo International, Eli lilly, Pfizer, Actavis (Allergan), Bayer, Novartis, Teva, Mylan, Upsher-Smith, Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Kyowa Kirin, Acerus Pharmaceuticals

Key questions answered in the report:

What is the growth potential of the Testosterone Replacement Therapy market?

Which product segment will grab a lions share?

Which regional market will emerge as a frontrunner in the coming years?

Which application segment will grow at a robust rate?

What are the growth opportunities that may emerge in the Testosterone Replacement Therapy industry in the years to come?

What are the key challenges that the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market may face in the future?

Which are the leading companies in the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market?

Which are the key trends positively impacting the market growth?

Which are the growth strategies considered by the players to sustain hold in the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market

Reasons to buy this report:

QY Research report is designed in a method that assists clients to acquire a complete knowledge of the overall market scenario and the important sectors.

This report consists of a detailed overview of market dynamics and comprehensive research.

Explore further market opportunities and identify high potential categories based on detailed volume and value analysis

Detail information on competitive landscape, recent market trends and changing technologies that can be useful for the companies which are competing in this market

Gaining knowledge about competitive landscape based on detailed brand share analysis to plan an effective market positioning

Enquire Customization in the Report

https://www.qyresearch.com/customize-request/form/1433485/global-testosterone-replacement-therapy-market

Finally, the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market is a valuable source of guidance for individuals and companies. One of the major reasons behind providing market attractiveness index is to help the target audience and clients to identify the several market opportunities in the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market. Moreover, for a better understanding of the market, QY Research has also presented a key to get information about various segments of the global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market.

Tables of ContentTable of Contents 1 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Overview1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Testosterone Replacement Therapy1.2 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Segment by Type1.2.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales Growth Rate Comparison by Type (2021-2026)1.2.2 Gels1.2.3 Injections1.2.4 Patches1.2.5 Other1.3 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Segment by Application1.3.1 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales Comparison by Application: 2020 VS 20261.3.2 Hospitals1.3.3 Clinics1.3.4 Others1.4 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Size Estimates and Forecasts1.4.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Revenue 2015-20261.4.2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales 2015-20261.4.3 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Size by Region: 2020 Versus 2026 2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Competition by Manufacturers2.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales Market Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.3 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Average Price by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.4 Manufacturers Testosterone Replacement Therapy Manufacturing Sites, Area Served, Product Type2.5 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Competitive Situation and Trends2.5.1 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Concentration Rate2.5.2 Global Top 5 and Top 10 Players Market Share by Revenue2.5.3 Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)2.6 Manufacturers Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans2.7 Primary Interviews with Key Testosterone Replacement Therapy Players (Opinion Leaders) 3 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Retrospective Market Scenario by Region3.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Retrospective Market Scenario in Sales by Region: 2015-20203.2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Retrospective Market Scenario in Revenue by Region: 2015-20203.3 North America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Facts & Figures by Country3.3.1 North America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.3.2 North America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.3.3 U.S.3.3.4 Canada3.4 Europe Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Facts & Figures by Country3.4.1 Europe Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.4.2 Europe Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.4.3 Germany3.4.4 France3.4.5 U.K.3.4.6 Italy3.4.7 Russia3.5 Asia Pacific Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Facts & Figures by Region3.5.1 Asia Pacific Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Region3.5.2 Asia Pacific Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Region3.5.3 China3.5.4 Japan3.5.5 South Korea3.5.6 India3.5.7 Australia3.5.8 Taiwan3.5.9 Indonesia3.5.10 Thailand3.5.11 Malaysia3.5.12 Philippines3.5.13 Vietnam3.6 Latin America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Facts & Figures by Country3.6.1 Latin America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.6.2 Latin America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.6.3 Mexico3.6.3 Brazil3.6.3 Argentina3.7 Middle East and Africa Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Facts & Figures by Country3.7.1 Middle East and Africa Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.7.2 Middle East and Africa Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales by Country3.7.3 Turkey3.7.4 Saudi Arabia3.7.5 U.A.E 4 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Historic Market Analysis by Type4.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales Market Share by Type (2015-2020)4.2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Revenue Market Share by Type (2015-2020)4.3 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Price Market Share by Type (2015-2020)4.4 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Share by Price Tier (2015-2020): Low-End, Mid-Range and High-End 5 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Historic Market Analysis by Application5.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales Market Share by Application (2015-2020)5.2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Revenue Market Share by Application (2015-2020)5.3 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Price by Application (2015-2020) 6 Company Profiles and Key Figures in Testosterone Replacement Therapy Business6.1 AbbVie6.1.1 Corporation Information6.1.2 AbbVie Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.1.3 AbbVie Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.1.4 AbbVie Products Offered6.1.5 AbbVie Recent Development6.2 Endo International6.2.1 Endo International Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.2.2 Endo International Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.2.3 Endo International Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.2.4 Endo International Products Offered6.2.5 Endo International Recent Development6.3 Eli lilly6.3.1 Eli lilly Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.3.2 Eli lilly Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.3.3 Eli lilly Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.3.4 Eli lilly Products Offered6.3.5 Eli lilly Recent Development6.4 Pfizer6.4.1 Pfizer Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.4.2 Pfizer Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.4.3 Pfizer Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.4.4 Pfizer Products Offered6.4.5 Pfizer Recent Development6.5 Actavis (Allergan)6.5.1 Actavis (Allergan) Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.5.2 Actavis (Allergan) Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.5.3 Actavis (Allergan) Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.5.4 Actavis (Allergan) Products Offered6.5.5 Actavis (Allergan) Recent Development6.6 Bayer6.6.1 Bayer Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.6.2 Bayer Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.6.3 Bayer Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.6.4 Bayer Products Offered6.6.5 Bayer Recent Development6.7 Novartis6.6.1 Novartis Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.6.2 Novartis Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.6.3 Novartis Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.4.4 Novartis Products Offered6.7.5 Novartis Recent Development6.8 Teva6.8.1 Teva Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.8.2 Teva Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.8.3 Teva Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.8.4 Teva Products Offered6.8.5 Teva Recent Development6.9 Mylan6.9.1 Mylan Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.9.2 Mylan Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.9.3 Mylan Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.9.4 Mylan Products Offered6.9.5 Mylan Recent Development6.10 Upsher-Smith6.10.1 Upsher-Smith Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.10.2 Upsher-Smith Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.10.3 Upsher-Smith Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.10.4 Upsher-Smith Products Offered6.10.5 Upsher-Smith Recent Development6.11 Ferring Pharmaceuticals6.11.1 Ferring Pharmaceuticals Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.11.2 Ferring Pharmaceuticals Testosterone Replacement Therapy Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.11.3 Ferring Pharmaceuticals Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.11.4 Ferring Pharmaceuticals Products Offered6.11.5 Ferring Pharmaceuticals Recent Development6.12 Kyowa Kirin6.12.1 Kyowa Kirin Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.12.2 Kyowa Kirin Testosterone Replacement Therapy Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.12.3 Kyowa Kirin Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.12.4 Kyowa Kirin Products Offered6.12.5 Kyowa Kirin Recent Development6.13 Acerus Pharmaceuticals6.13.1 Acerus Pharmaceuticals Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production Sites and Area Served6.13.2 Acerus Pharmaceuticals Testosterone Replacement Therapy Description, Business Overview and Total Revenue6.13.3 Acerus Pharmaceuticals Testosterone Replacement Therapy Sales, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)6.13.4 Acerus Pharmaceuticals Products Offered6.13.5 Acerus Pharmaceuticals Recent Development 7 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Manufacturing Cost Analysis7.1 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Key Raw Materials Analysis7.1.1 Key Raw Materials7.1.2 Key Raw Materials Price Trend7.1.3 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials7.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure7.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Testosterone Replacement Therapy7.4 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industrial Chain Analysis 8 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers8.1 Marketing Channel8.2 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Distributors List8.3 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Customers 9 Market Dynamics 9.1 Market Trends 9.2 Opportunities and Drivers 9.3 Challenges 9.4 Porters Five Forces Analysis 10 Global Market Forecast10.1 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Estimates and Projections by Type10.1.1 Global Forecasted Sales of Testosterone Replacement Therapy by Type (2021-2026)10.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Testosterone Replacement Therapy by Type (2021-2026)10.2 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Estimates and Projections by Application10.2.1 Global Forecasted Sales of Testosterone Replacement Therapy by Application (2021-2026)10.2.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Testosterone Replacement Therapy by Application (2021-2026)10.3 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Estimates and Projections by Region10.3.1 Global Forecasted Sales of Testosterone Replacement Therapy by Region (2021-2026)10.3.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Testosterone Replacement Therapy by Region (2021-2026)10.4 North America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Estimates and Projections (2021-2026)10.5 Europe Testosterone Replacement Therapy Estimates and Projections (2021-2026)10.6 Asia Pacific Testosterone Replacement Therapy Estimates and Projections (2021-2026)10.7 Latin America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Estimates and Projections (2021-2026)10.8 Middle East and Africa Testosterone Replacement Therapy Estimates and Projections (2021-2026) 11 Research Finding and Conclusion 12 Methodology and Data Source 12.1 Methodology/Research Approach 12.1.1 Research Programs/Design 12.1.2 Market Size Estimation 12.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation 12.2 Data Source 12.2.1 Secondary Sources 12.2.2 Primary Sources 12.3 Author List 12.4 Disclaimer

About Us:

QYResearch always pursuits high product quality with the belief that quality is the soul of business. Through years of effort and supports from a huge number of customer supports, QYResearch consulting group has accumulated creative design methods on many high-quality markets investigation and research team with rich experience. Today, QYResearch has become the brand of quality assurance in consulting industry.

Read more here:
Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Overview and Outlook Report by 2026 - Weekly Wall


Jun 13

Viewing Party! Lets All Watch Nine to Five! – The New York Times

With cities starting to reopen after months of pandemic-prescribed lockdown, people are talking about office life. The open-floor plan so beloved of managers is likely to be a thing of the past, replaced by Plexiglas barriers or work-from-home video links. These changes, combined with a spate of highly publicized worker revolts tied to diversity issues, suggest that the old office norms are under siege, which makes it seem like a good time to revisit Nine to Five.

When it was released in 1980, The New York Times dryly called it an office comedy. Thats true, though its more of a comedy about a female uprising. The story is a pip: Three beleaguered secretaries join forces to battle their bullying, sexist boss. Hilarity, implausible high jinks and bondage jokes ensue, but what matters is that the three oppressed workers are played by the glorious trio of Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and Dolly Parton, in her screen debut. Parton also sang the catchy title song, which became a hit.

Workin 9 to 5, what a way to make a livin

Barely gettin by, its all takin and no givin

They just use your mind and they never give you credit

Its enough to drive you crazy if you let it

Inspired by the women she met during one of her national tours, Fonda decided to make a movie about the discrimination facing female office workers. We did not see it as a comedy at first, she later wrote. Whats funny about working 15-hour days and getting paid for 40 hours work a week? But a comedy it became, with the director Colin Higgins writing the script with Patricia Resnick, and Tomlin and Parton stealing the show. The film was a hit and spawned a TV series and a Broadway musical. Not everyone was a fan, but as the 1980s became a decade known for testosterone-fueled action movies, the flickering feminist righteousness of Nine to Five was encouraging.

Forty years later, were curious: Do you see the films vision of workplace sisterhood as noble or pandering? Ahead of its time or, in the era of #MeToo and intersectional feminism, hopelessly dated? Do Tomlin, Fonda and Parton make you laugh? Nine to Five is widely available to rent or buy online; heres a guide. Please watch it over the weekend and let us know what you think in the comments section below. The cutoff for feedback is 6 p.m. Eastern time, Monday. Well read what you have to say and share our ideas on both the film and your observations on Tuesday.

Originally posted here:
Viewing Party! Lets All Watch Nine to Five! - The New York Times


Jun 13

The Coming Out of a Transgender Scientist – The MIT Press Reader

"I know that I am making the right decision because whenever I think about changing my gender role, I am flooded with feelings of relief."

By: Ben Barres

Shortly before Ben Barres death in December 2017, the pioneering neuroscientist sent his friend Nancy Hopkins a heartbreaking email in which he told her hed been diagnosed with advanced metastatic pancreatic cancer and probably only had a few months left to live.

Barres, who was known as much for his advocacy for gender equality in science as for his groundbreaking work on glial cells, the unsung heroes of the brain, spent his final months writing The Autobiography of a Transgender Scientist, which was posthumously published in 2018. In the excerpt featured below, Barres candidly describes making the transition from female to male in the late 1990s and shares a coming-out letter he wrote to friends and colleagues. This has been a difficult decision because I risk losing everything of importance to me: my reputation, my career, my friends and even my family, he tells them. I know that I am making the right decision because whenever I think about changing my gender role, I am flooded with feelings of relief.

After about four years at Stanford, I was promoted to associate professor with tenure. One morning, I was reading a local newspaper, the San Francisco Chronicle, and came across and read with astonishment a four-page article about Jamison Green, a female to male transgender person and transgender rights activist. He was one of few openly transgender people at the time. In the article, Green described in detail his personal experiences with gender identity and to my surprise they mirrored my own very closely. This was the first time that I understood that there were others who had the same gender identity discordance that I had. It was also the first time that I had heard the word transgender.

The article mentioned the clinic of Don Laub, a Stanford plastic surgeon who was a Bay Area pioneer in helping transgender people. As I started to read more about other transgender people, I realized that I was likely transgender. I made an appointment to be evaluated at his clinic. It was the first time I was able to discuss my gender confusion with anyone. I met with Dr. Laub, as well as with an experienced psychologist who had worked with him for many years. The clinic concluded that I was transgender and offered to help me to transition from female to male.

At that time, transsexuality was still listed as a mental illness in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a classification of mental disorders published by the American Psychiatric Association. Proponents of this view argued that it was wrong and harmful to help people change their sex. Did I have a mental illness? I did not think so. Moreover, reflecting on my experiences during psychiatry rotations during my neurology training days, my impression was that the incidence of serious mental illness was likely far higher in psychiatrists than in transgender people. So I did not see why they should get to categorize me as mentally ill! Moreover, I had been exposed to a testosterone-like drug during fetal development and my masculinization was consistent with relevant animal and human data.

I felt an irresistible desire to transition from female to male from the moment I was offered that possibility. But I thought about it for several weeks because I was worried about what the repercussions might be for my career. Even though I was already tenured and so did not have to worry about being fired a frequent outcome for transgender people in other professions at the time (in many states, transgender people are still not legally protected from being fired) there was much to consider.

Would new students or postdocs wish to join my lab? Would my colleagues reject me? Would I still be invited to meetings and so forth?

I did not know of any successful transgender scientists, and I worried whether, if I transitioned, I would be able to get any more grants (it was already nearly impossible). Would new students or postdocs wish to join my lab? Would my colleagues reject me? Would I still be invited to meetings and so forth? Reading about the experiences of other folks in other professions who had transitioned, I strongly feared that a transition would end my career. For about a week, I was almost unable to sleep from the stress as I pondered whether I should transition or commit suicide. I finally decided to open up to three friends whose opinion I valued very much: David Corey, Martin Raff, and Louis Reichardt. For the first time, I opened up to them about my gender confusion and told them that I was considering changing sex. Did they think that the repercussions would be so bad that it would harm my career? To my great relief, all three were immediately and strongly supportive. Based on their support, I decided to transition. I sent out the following letter to my colleagues, family, and friends late in December of 1997 to let them know of my gender dysphoria and my decision to transition.

Dear friends,

I am writing to disclose a personal problem that Ive been struggling with for some time. It is important for me to talk about it now in order that I can finally move forward.

Ever since I was a few years old, I have had profound feelings that I was born the wrong sex. As a child I played with boys toys and boys nearly exclusively. As a teenager, I could not wear dresses, shave, wear jewelry, makeup, or anything remotely feminine without extreme discomfort; I watched amazed as all of these things came easily to my sisters. Instead I wanted to wear male clothing, be in the boy scouts, do shop, play sports with the guys, do auto mechanics and so forth. Since childhood, I have been ridiculed and shunned by women and by men. At the age of 17, I learned that I had been born without a uterus or vagina (Mullerian agenesis), and that I had been exposed prenatally to masculinizing hormones. Despite plastic surgical correction of my birth defect, throughout my life I have continued to have intensely strong feelings of non-identity with women. Perhaps most disturbingly I feel that I have the wrong genitals and have had violent thoughts about them. My lack of female identity was brought home vividly to me recently after having bilateral mastectomies for breast cancer. This surgery, rather than being an assault on my female identity as it was for my mother, felt corrective as my breasts never seemed like they should be there anyway; the thought of reconstructive surgery has been repellent to me. Since the surgery, people who do not know me often call me sir, but that doesnt bother me either. It is not that I wish I were male, rather, I feel that I already am.

It would be difficult to describe the mental anguish that this gender confusion has caused me. Although I have never been clinically depressed, it has been the source of strong feelings of worthlessness, intense isolation, hopelessness and self-destructive feelings. I have never been able to talk to anyone about it because I felt so ashamed and embarrassed by it. It seemed that it must be my fault, that somehow I should be able to make myself be a woman. This is how things stood until two months ago, when I read in the newspaper about the existence of a gender clinic at Stanford. They found that I have a condition known as gender dysphoria. To my amazement, I learned that I am not alone and that my story is stereotypical of all of those who have this condition.

So what is gender dysphoria (also known as being transgendered or as gender identity disorder)? Those who have it feel from childhood a strong mismatch between their anatomical sex and their brain sex (gender identity). The cause is unknown but is thought to be biological, as some cases are clearly associated with a history of hormone exposure during development. Although it is not treatable by psychotherapy, the dysphoria is substantially lessened by a change in gender role. Treatment with testosterone induces normal male secondary sexual characteristics within 6 to 12 months. Most patients also opt for mastectomies, which I have already had, and hysterectomy, which nature has already done for me. In my case, testosterone treatment would have the added benefits of substantially lowering my chance of new or recurrent breast cancer, because it lowers estrogen levels, and would block the osteoporosis and menopausal symptoms that will otherwise follow when I have my ovaries removed because of my cancer susceptibility mutation.

After much reflection, I have made the decision to take testosterone. I will thus become a female to male transsexual. This has been a difficult decision because I risk losing everything of importance to me: my reputation, my career, my friends and even my family. Testosterone is a far from perfect solution; Im still not going to be normal and social isolation will undoubtedly continue. But testosterone treatment offers the possibility that for the first time in my life I might feel comfortable with myself and not have to fake who I am anymore. I know that I am making the right decision because whenever I think about changing my gender role, I am flooded with feelings of relief. I will begin taking testosterone in February. A change in my appearance will not be visible for several months. By summer, I will begin to dress in mens clothes and will change my name to Ben. Throughout this process I will continue to work normally and to conduct myself in all ways as usual (except that I will only use single occupancy bathrooms). Although the idea of my changing sex will take some time for you to get used to, the reality is that Im not going to change all that much. Im still going to wear jeans and tee shirts and pretty much be the same person I always have beenits just that I am going to be a lot happier.

Many transsexuals change jobs after their sex change in order to retain anonymity, but anonymity is obviously not an option for menor is it one I desire. I am tired of hiding who I am. More importantly I owe it to others who unknowingly endure this condition, as I did, to be visible. Despite my 7 years of medical training, which I undertook to understand what was wrong with me, until 2 months ago I had never heard of gender dysphoria (oddly I somehow picked the right organ to study!). Had it not been for the transsexual who allowed himself to be the subject of the news piece I read, I would still not know about it. Sure I knew that sometimes there were male to female transsexuals but I had thought that these people were perverts. I am not a pervert; I dont seek pleasureonly relief from pain. Most transsexuals hide because of shame and fear, perpetuating ignorance and oppression about their condition. Their suicide rate is so high that some experts have called gender dysphoria a lethal disease. This is why I cannot hide.

In my heart I feel that I am a good scientist and teacher. I hope that despite my trans sexuality you will allow me to continue with the work that, as you all know, I love. I am happy to answer any questions.

Sincerely,

Barbara A. Barres

Despite support from David, Martin, and Louis, sending out this letter was still very scary. I found that my family was immediately supportive and so were all of my colleagues. I heard back from many of them very quickly. Here is the very first response that I received. It is from Chuck Stevens at Salk, a colleague I had long admired for his science and his wonderfully generous mentorship of so many young scientists).

Dear Barbara,

Thanks for the letter and the personal info. I have always been fond of the person in there and the gender makes zero difference to meI expect you will find the same with all of your friends. Let me know when to change to Ben.

Best regards,

Chuck

All of the other responses I received were similarly supportive. And there it was: this shameful secret I had held inside of me for forty years was out, and within a few months I had transitioned to Ben simply by taking testosterone (mastectomies had already been done, but I did have my ovaries removed soon thereafter as they were a cancer risk because of my BRCA2 mutation; the testosterone prevented menopausal symptoms). My career went on as before without a hitch. I am not aware of a single adverse thing that has happened to me in the past twenty years as a result of my being transgender, but there was the immediate relief of all emotional pain as a result of my transition. Never did I think of suicide again and I felt much happier being myself (Ben), no longer having to pretend to be a woman. It is hard to explain how much relief I felt and how much happier I became. It was as if a huge weight had suddenly been lifted from my shoulders.

I should also say that Stanford as a whole was very supportive, including the provost, dean, and all my faculty colleagues. To be honest, I feared that some of the faculty in my department might be embarrassed by my transition. Back then the internet had only recently come into existence and there was still much ignorance about transsexuality. If they had any qualms they did not mention them and they were all completely supportive even the curmudgeonly clock is ticking guy!

I am not aware of a single adverse thing that has happened to me in the past twenty years as a result of my being transgender, but there was the immediate relief of all emotional pain as a result of my transition.

I would like to think that I eventually accomplished enough to fit in. I was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2013. I was proud to be the first transgender scientist to be elected to NAS and was upset when the academy president refused to mention this in the NAS press release on the grounds that the academy had to deal with religious people. I was deeply disturbed by this as it denies LGBT people proper attribution for their accomplishments, particularly given the great need of LGBT students to be aware of successful role models. Fortunately other news writers soon mentioned it in pieces about me.

How did taking testosterone affect me? It is powerful stuff! There were some of the expected side effects such as increased sex drive for a while (almost like going through a second puberty) and the development of a male hair pattern. I was delighted to be able to grow a mustache and beard, but less thrilled with the rapid onset hair loss that began almost immediately upon start of testosterone (my photograph shows the extent of these effects). All cellulite quickly disappeared. Fat distribution changed from hips and buttocks to abdomen (but a lot stayed everywhere else too). I became much stronger even without doing any exercise. I had never been able to do a single pushup as Barbara, but after about six months of taking testosterone, I noticed that my triceps were beefing up. To my surprise, I was able to do ten pushups (and soon thirty, although I never really worked at it).

I did not particularly notice any change in mathematical, spatial, or verbal abilities, although I did notice on a test that was given to me before and after testosterone that my verbal abilities seemed a little worse and my spatial abilities seemed a bit improved. I still get lost every time I get in a car. Perhaps the most surprising and unexpected effect, though, was that I largely lost the ability to cry. Before testosterone I cried easily, and often cried myself to sleep because of the gender anguish. But after testosterone I found that I was almost entirely unable to cry any more. In response to some very strongly sad stimulus, perhaps I would shed a tear, but the feeling would almost instantly pass. Many other transgender men have told me this has happened to them also, whereas transgender women gain the ability to cry much more easily.

I hope that kids who are able to transition early will be spared the anguish of growing up in the wrong gender with the wrong body, will be able to have more normal social and romantic interactions, and will not have to keep shameful secrets from their families.

When I transitioned in 1997, it was thought that only one in about 20,000 people were transgender, but now, in 2017, it is thought that at least one in 200 people are transgender. LGBT people are often high achievers. Many LGBT people in my generation share growing up with a shameful secret and consequent low self-esteem. Perhaps this may drive us to work hard to succeed in order to prove our self-worth. Things are changing fast for transgender people. The internet has enabled relevant information to be easily researched and accessed, and the public is now being rapidly educated. TV shows often feature transgender characters, and transgender people can now serve openly in the military. There are still some battles being fought, such as gaining protection from being fired for being transgender, as well as bathroom protections, but the public is mostly sympathetic to and supportive of LGBT people, so I believe these battles will soon be won.

Most important, clinics are popping up to help trans children. As a result of public education, trans kids often self-identify, or are identified by their parents, even at grade school age. As they approach puberty, if their transgender identity persists, these kids can be treated with puberty blockers so they do not undergo permanent bodily changes inconsistent with their gender identity. Then when they are of age, at about sixteen years old, they can make the decision about whether they wish to transition. Up to now at least 40 percent of transgender people attempt suicide. I hope that kids who are able to transition early will be spared the anguish of growing up in the wrong gender with the wrong body, will be able to have more normal social and romantic interactions, and will not have to keep shameful secrets from their families. How I envy them!

I am happy to be an openly transgender scientist and to serve as a role model for young LGBT scientists. I hope that I have helped ease their way a little bit. LGBT students and postdocs at Stanford and other institutions frequently contact me to discuss whether or not to be open in their applications to various training programs. I always counsel them to be open about who they are, as it seems to me that currently the advantages far outweigh the risks. The vast majority of academics are highly supportive. It is very difficult to live life in a closet. It does not make sense to do this because of an occasional bigot. I have yet to have anyone tell me they regretted their decision to be open.

Ben Barres (19542017) was Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurology at Stanford University and one of the worlds leading researchers on the role of the brain cells known as glia. This article is excerpted from his book The Autobiography of a Transgender Scientist.

Originally posted here:
The Coming Out of a Transgender Scientist - The MIT Press Reader


Jun 10

Ego might drive men to testosterone therapy, but it helps with certain conditions – The Columbus Dispatch

Many companies push testosterone-boosting supplements, but experts say theyre helpful only for certain conditions.

The popular ad features graying men whose female partners gaze longingly at them.

They proclaim: "Men: Feel younger and stronger," "Boost performance" and "Have sex again!"

The ads promote pills, creams and injections, and guide those yearning for their youth to clinics that can offer life-changing results.

Critics say the testosterone replacement therapy industry relies on aggressive marketing, touts some dubious claims and targets men who lack real medical needs.

Gahannas Low T Center has heard the good and the bad, and staff members must help new patients overcome objections and myths. Many customers are drawn in by ego and societys view of male virility.

"One of the main things that keeps guys from coming in is that they may think its like a hit to their man card," said Kortney Doss, a nurse at the Gahanna clinic.

The clinic and its sister location in Dublin each serves about 100 men daily, providing their weekly testosterone injections. The coronavirus pandemic has cut the visits in half, said Doss.

Its customers who continue coming, even during a health emergency, that clinics say are proof of the treatments effectiveness.

The same is true at Restorative Health in Dublin, which has as many as 900 regular patients many of them women, said Don Hale, the companys business consultant and spokesman.

Whether treating men or women, the marketing is driven by the male role in relationships, he said.

"A man will do anything to get and maintain an erection," he said. "I think it comes down to a mans ego."

A clinic typically performs a full physical, blood analysis and consultation at the first visit.

Even though testosterone is a natural hormone in both men and women, it can decline 1% per year after age 30 in men.

That "low normal" is not enough alone to prescribe testosterone, said Dr. Robert Murden, a geriatric specialist at Ohio State Universitys Wexner Medical Center.

Among his many patients, only six are doing TRT due to hypogonadism, an abnormally low hormone level, resulting in either low libido, erectile dysfunction, or loss of facial or body hair.

"Its specifically not recommended for people who are just tired. You shouldnt just try it. You dont give these things, with downsides, without clinical indications."

The risks include elevated red blood cell count, elevation in estrogen, acne or other skin reactions, testicular atrophy, and cardiovascular or liver complications.

Testosterone levels below 300 nanograms per deciliter put you in Low T territory, said Dr. Gregory Lowe, an OhioHealth urologist. That might cause fatigue, lack of sexual desire, worsening erections, issues with concentration and memory, or diminished recovery from workouts.

Some men come to him after seeing the ads.

"The main thing I hear from guys is to be able to put on muscle in the weight room and to be 18 again in the bedroom," he said.

But not all symptoms are caused by low testosterone. Lowe said they might instead be remedied by exercise, stress reduction, more sleep or improved diet.

"I always want my patients to be very critical of the therapy were providing, to tell me how it is helping," he said.

Lowe said he has no major complaints with private clinics where testosterone treatments include gels, patches or pellets injected in the buttocks to release the hormone slowly.

Dr. John Oliver DeLancey, an assistant professor of urology at Wexner Medical Center, said patients should first check with their primary care physicians before seeking treatment elsewhere.

"Testosterone replacement therapy gets sort of a bad rap for being overused and without appropriate testing and monitoring," he said.

"As long as you follow appropriate guidelines and put thoughtful care into why you are doing so and for the right reasons, it can be very safe and effective," DeLancey said.

Asked whether slowing down, and some of these changes, might not be just a normal part of aging, Hale, of Restorative Health, responded: "Is it normal to lose your teeth or hearing when you age, and do nothing about it?

"If so, I dont want to be normal."

Thirteen years ago, he and his wife, then both 57, began testosterone treatments and havent stopped.

"Weve been on a honeymoon ever since," Hale said.

The cost of treatment at the Dublin clinic is $3,950 per year for men and $2,950 for women. Some insurance plans reimburse up to half of that, whats considered routine blood work.

Dee Miller, a standout wide receiver for the Ohio State University football team (1994-98), said he was lethargic, overweight and often stressed out before beginning treatments in 2016.

"My wife even thought I was cheating on her" due to his lack of energy and romance, he recalled, laughing.

Since then, he said, "I feel mentally better. As for your libido, most honestly, yes."

An insurance agent, Miller is a paid endorser of Low T Center.

The treatments, he said, "are hitting all three facets: physical, emotional and socially."

dnarciso@dispatch.com

@DeanNarciso

Read more from the original source:
Ego might drive men to testosterone therapy, but it helps with certain conditions - The Columbus Dispatch


Jun 10

New Theories Explaining Why Women are More Susceptible to Autoimmune Disease than Men – Managed Healthcare Executive

Although autoimmune disease (AD) affects both genders, womenare atan overwhelming disadvantage. Of the approximate8% of the population affected by AD, a whopping 78% of those cases are women (NCBI). The National Institutes of Health has officially designated autoimmune disease as a major womens health issue.

Autoimmunity in and of itself is very complicated, withmore than80 diseases under its umbrella. The rate at which AD affects women over men, is no exception to the complexity of understanding this group of diseases. Through recent studies, scientists have found evidence to support three significant theories to explain why women are so greatly affected by AD compared to men.

Testosterone levels protect menAccording to researchers at theUniversity of Gothenburg, there is a link between the male sex hormone testosterone and protection against autoimmune diseases. Men are generally more protected than women, who only have one-tenth as much testosterone. Their study confirmed that this hormone reduces the number of B cells, a type of lymphocyte that releases harmful antibodies.Testosterone suppresses the protein BAFF, which makes the harmful B cells more viable. Therefore, women dont benefit from the same protection against these B cells.

These findings support those of aprevious studyshowing the link between varying levels of BAFF andsystemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease that affects nine women for every one man. Lupus is one of the most common autoimmune diseases among women.

SkinPerhaps one of the most interesting findings was uncovered in a study at The University of Michigan three years ago. Researchers discovered that women carry more of a molecular switch, called VGLL3, in their skin than men do. In2019, further research pointed to evidence showing that having too much VGLL3 in skin cells pushes the immune system into overdrive, leading to a self-attacking autoimmune response that can extend beyond the skin, also attacking internal organs.

The same gene expression-level changes in skin cells with extra VGLL3 are also seen in autoimmune diseases such as lupus. It is still not known why women have more VGLL3 in their skin than men. However, men with lupus do show the same VGLL3 pathway activated as in women with lupus.

The Pregnancy Compensation Hypothesis and hormonesThe idea behind this theory is that a womans immune system evolves to support the heightened need for protection during pregnancy. According to Melissa Wilson, PhD and senior author of astudyconducted at Arizona State University, reduced pregnancy rates in todays modern, industrialized societies means womens immune systems dont have the reproductive challenges they are meant to stand up against. These changes in the reproductive ecology of women makes them more susceptible to autoimmune disease because immune surveillance is heightened.

Continued here:
New Theories Explaining Why Women are More Susceptible to Autoimmune Disease than Men - Managed Healthcare Executive


Jun 10

Is There New Hope for Trans Men Trying to Give Birth? – Advocate.com

A first-of-its-kind study published by Fertility and Sterility revealed that transgender men have a similar response to ovarian stimulation as cisgender women, even after theyve been using testosterone for years.

The aim of the study was to investigate the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology in trans men and compare those to a matched group of cisgender women to see if testosterone had a noticeable impact on fertility through egg freezing, in vitro fertilization, and other forms of assisted fertility.

Researchers reviewed the records of 26 trans males and 130 cisgender women who sought care from 2010 to 2018. The majority of trans males (61 percent) had received testosterone hormonal therapy but were off the hormone a mean of four months before starting assisted reproductive therapy. The mean time they were on testosterone before seeking fertility assistance was 3.7 years (however, the range spanned from three months to 17 years).

In all 26 cases, the trans men had viable eggs retrieved, with an average of 20 eggs per person. Overall, 16 out of the 26 trans men only had eggs retrieved and preserved in a cryogenic bank, while seven had fresh or frozen egg transfers.

Of those seven, two carried the babies themselves while the remaining five had transferred embryos implanted in cisgender female partners. All of the pregnancies were successfully carried to term, ending in live births.

The study itself is groundbreaking for trans men who dream of having biological children but are worried about how testosterone use interacts with fertility. It should also encourage doctors who have shown reluctance in referring their trans patients to a fertility practice to reconsider.

Before this study, we did not know if long-term testosterone use had a negative impact on egg reserve but, remarkably, testosterone does not appear to have an effect on the ovarian reserve as measured by egg count, researcher Nina Resetkova told Medscape Medical News. Trans males worry that theyve thrown in the towel, and by committing to testosterone have started on a pathway with no return, but these data suggest they still have options.

Resetkova did caution that trans men who undergo puberty blockers as teens may see those options curtailed. We have little data so its hard to be conclusive, but its unlikely these patients would have mature hormonal responses and the ovaries might be in a naive state, she hypothesized.

Acknowledging that the study was limited by size, Resetkova noted that it found ovarian stimulation outcomes that are similar to those of cisgender counterparts, and this seems to be true even in cases of patients who have already initiated hormonal transition with the use of testosterone.

Read more here:
Is There New Hope for Trans Men Trying to Give Birth? - Advocate.com


Jun 10

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Sales Segmentation and Analysis by Recent Trends, Development and Growth Factors by Regions Overview to 2026 -…

Our latest research report entitle global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market provides comprehensive and deep insights into the market dynamics and growth of Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry. Latest information on market risks, industry chain structure, Testosterone Replacement Therapy cost structure and opportunities are offered in this report. The entire industry is fragmented based on geographical regions, a wide range of applications and Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market types. The past, present and forecast market information will lead to investment feasibility by studying the crucial Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry growth factors.

Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Analysis By Major Players:

AbbviePfizerEli LillyTeva PharmaceuticalsMylanBayer Healthcare PharmaceuticalsAntares PharmaFerring PharmaceuticalsAllerganAntares PharmaSandozClarus TherapeuticsJuniper PharmaceuticalsEndo InternationalAcerus PharmaceuticalsForendo PharmaMetp PharmaRepros Therapeutics

Get FREE Sample Report Copy @ https://www.globalmarketers.biz/report/business-services/2018-global-testosterone-replacement-therapy-industry-research-report/118104#request_sample

By Product Type:

GelsInjectablesPatchesOther

By End-User

HospitalsClinicsOther

Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Analysis By Geographical Zones:

Europe Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market (Germany, France, Italy, Russia and UK)

North America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market (Canada, USA and Mexico)

Latin America Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market (Middle and Africa).

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market in Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

Asia-Pacific Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market (South-east Asia, China, India, Korea and Japan).

Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market news, plans & policies, market drivers, analysis of upstream raw material suppliers and downstream buyers of Testosterone Replacement Therapy is carried out in this report. On regional and country level market share, production value, gross margin analysis, consumption ratio, import-export scenario, and SWOT analysis is covered. Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry forecast study enlists the market value (in USD) and volume forecast for each region, product type, and applications.

Inquiry Here For Detail Report @ https://www.globalmarketers.biz/report/business-services/2018-global-testosterone-replacement-therapy-industry-research-report/118104#inquiry_before_buying

To Provide A Clear Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Structure The Report Is Divided Into 12 Chapters As Follows:

Chapter 1, states the product definition, specifications, pictures, classification and varied applications of Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry;

Chapter 2, covers the price structure and Market structure covering the cost of raw materials, manufacturing cost, supplier detail of Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market;

Chapter 3, lists the technical specifications of Testosterone Replacement Therapy covering the capacity, production volume, manufacturing base, R&D status, and sources;

Chapter 4, represents the market analysis, sales channel, pricing trend, and import-export scenario of Testosterone Replacement Therapy;

Chapter 5 and 6, studies the regional presence of Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy market across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East & Africa. Also, Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market analysis by Type is covered in this report;

Chapter 7 and 8, Testosterone Replacement Therapy market analysis by application and major manufacturers is covered in this report;

Chapter 9, Global and Regional Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry trend analysis by different applications and product types is mentioned in this chapter;

Chapter 10, Enlist the regional and international Testosterone Replacement Therapy import-export scenario, utilization ratio, and supply chain analysis;

Chapter 11, The consumer analysis is covered in this chapter;

Chapter 12, presents the key research findings, conclusion, analyst views, data sources, and in-depth research methodology;

Enquire Here For Discount :https://www.globalmarketers.biz/discount_inquiry/discount/118104

Major points from Table of Contents for Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry 2020 Market Research Report include:

1 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Overview

2 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Competition by Manufacturers

3 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Capacity, Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2020-2026)

4 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Region (2020-2026)

5 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type

6 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Analysis by Application

7 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Industry Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis

8 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Manufacturing Cost Analysis

9 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers

10 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

11 Market Effect Factors Analysis

12 Global Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Forecast (2020-2026)

13 Research Findings and Conclusion

14 Appendix

Explore Full Report With Detailed TOC Here @ https://www.globalmarketers.biz/report/business-services/2018-global-testosterone-replacement-therapy-industry-research-report/118104#table_of_contents

Here is the original post:
Testosterone Replacement Therapy Market Sales Segmentation and Analysis by Recent Trends, Development and Growth Factors by Regions Overview to 2026 -...


Jun 10

Debiopharm partners with Verity Pharmaceuticals for the exclusive US commercialization of Trelstar for Prostate Cancer – The Delaware County Daily…

LAUSANNE, Switzerland and WAYNE, Pa., June 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Debiopharm, a Swiss-based, biopharmaceutical company, and Verity Pharmaceuticals Inc., a US based specialty pharmaceutical company focused on therapeutic solutions for genitourinary (GU) diseases, today announced having entered into an exclusive agreementthat grants Verity Pharmaceuticals Inc., in the United States of America, the rights to commercialize Trelstar (triptorelinpamoate for injectable suspension)a hormone therapy for patients living with prostate cancer. The North American based company will take on US commercialization activities in this 20-year, extendable agreement for the brand used in the palliative treatment of prostate cancer.

Verity Pharma is dedicating resources to ensuring that physicians and patients are aware of the proven, consistent efficacy of Trelstar and how it may fit into their prostate cancer treatment plans. The availability of Triptorelin for patients around the world is the result of Debiopharm's expertise in oncology drug development & manufacturing. First registered in France in 1986, triptorelin is currently marketed in more than 80 countries and is a market leader in many territories worldwide.

"Trelstar has been proven to help patients keep castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) at bay, which has significant implications on their quality of life," said Dr. Neil Fleshner, CMO of Verity Pharma. "As we all grapple with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is also beneficial that this medicine can be administered as infrequently as once every six months while still effectively and consistently keeping testosterone levels down."

Additionally, Verity Pharma's pipeline has two promising bladder cancer drugs, one in Phase II, and another in preregistration and looks forward to continuing to provide innovative and effective pharmaceutical solutions to Americans living with genitourinary diseases. Debiopharm's cancer therapy pipeline also continues to expand, including phase I, II and phase III ready compounds for a variety of tumor types such as Head & Neck cancer and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

"Verity Pharma'sstrong focus in uro-oncology and seasoned management team make it an ideal alliance partner for the Trelstar brand," explained Bertrand Ducrey, CEO of Debiopharm. "Their scientific, sales and market access teams clearly add value and the expertise necessary to relaunch Trestar in the US."

"At Verity Pharma we do not simply distribute medicines, but partner with physicians and their patients to support them on their treatment journeys," said Howard Glase, CEO of Verity Pharma. "Thousands of people across the country already know just how impactful Trelstar is and we look forward to breathing new life into this important therapy."

Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths amongst American men, with nearly 200,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Trelstar, an androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is indicated for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer. It is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist that works by decreasing the amount of testosterone in the body and maintaining it below castration levels. For patients with prostate cancer, this course of treatment can help control or stop the growth of prostate cancer cells. It can also help delay the progression to CRPC.

About Prostate Cancer Treatment In the fight against prostate cancer, it is critical to bring testosterone levels down and keep them down and Trelstar has been shown to deliver lower, more consistent serum testosterone levels.

Maintaining consistently low levels of testosterone can extend the time CRPC by 10 years (median). This means patients are able to hold off on expensive, final stage treatments that have been associated with significant side effects and deterioration in quality of life. Trelstar helps patients to bring down testosterone levels and effectively keep them down over time.

About Trelstar (triptorelin)

Trelstar (triptorelin) is an agonist analogue of the natural gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). It is the only GnRH agonist that differs from natural GnRH by a single amino acid. Trelstar has been engineered to deliver superagonist activity and works by decreasing the amount of certain hormones in the body. This is referred to as androgen deprivation therapy or ADT. Debiopharm has developed three sustained-release formulations (1, 3 and 6 months) of triptorelin pamoate. In the US, triptorelin is registered for Prostate Cancer as Trelstar and was first approved and launched in 2000 for the palliative treatment of hormone dependent advanced carcinoma of the prostate gland. Trelstar has been in use as a trusted ADT in the United States for almost 20 years.

To learn more about Trelstar please see the Trelstar Prescribing Information or visit http://www.trelstar.com

About Debiopharm Debiopharm develops innovative therapies that target high unmet medical needs in oncology and bacterial infections. Bridging the gap between discovery products and real-world patient reach, they in-license high-potential compounds, clinically demonstrate their safety and efficacy and then select pharmaceutical commercialization partners to maximize patient access.

Visit us http://www.debiopharm.com/Follow us @DebiopharmNews at http://twitter.com/DebiopharmNews

About Verity Pharma Verity Pharma is a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on therapeutic solutions for genitourinary (GU) diseases.

Every day the Verity Pharma team goes to work with an unflinching conviction to deliver meaningful solutions to healthcare professionals and their patients.

Verity Pharma works with best in class global pharmaceutical manufacturing partners to ensure that product quality and availability is a constant deliverable.

We are also committed to supporting programs, initiatives and organizations that help improve health, expand research opportunities, and promote education in the growing area of genitourinary diseases and disorders.

For more information visit http://www.veritypharma.com

Continue reading here:
Debiopharm partners with Verity Pharmaceuticals for the exclusive US commercialization of Trelstar for Prostate Cancer - The Delaware County Daily...


Jun 10

Testosterone Booster Market 2019 Break Down by Top Companies, Countries, Applications, Challenges, Opportunities and Forecast 2026 – Cole of Duty

A new market report by Market Research Intellect on the Testosterone Booster Market has been released with reliable information and accurate forecasts for a better understanding of the current and future market scenarios. The report offers an in-depth analysis of the global market, including qualitative and quantitative insights, historical data, and estimated projections about the market size and share in the forecast period. The forecasts mentioned in the report have been acquired by using proven research assumptions and methodologies. Hence, this research study serves as an important depository of the information for every market landscape. The report is segmented on the basis of types, end-users, applications, and regional markets.

The research study includes the latest updates about the COVID-19 impact on the Testosterone Booster sector. The outbreak has broadly influenced the global economic landscape. The report contains a complete breakdown of the current situation in the ever-evolving business sector and estimates the aftereffects of the outbreak on the overall economy.

Get Sample Copy with TOC of the Report to understand the structure of the complete report @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/download-sample/?rid=230530&utm_source=COD&utm_medium=888

The report also emphasizes the initiatives undertaken by the companies operating in the market including product innovation, product launches, and technological development to help their organization offer more effective products in the market. It also studies notable business events, including corporate deals, mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnerships, product launches, and brand promotions.

Leading Testosterone Booster manufacturers/companies operating at both regional and global levels:

Sales and sales broken down by Product:

Sales and sales divided by Applications:

The report also inspects the financial standing of the leading companies, which includes gross profit, revenue generation, sales volume, sales revenue, manufacturing cost, individual growth rate, and other financial ratios.

The report also focuses on the global industry trends, development patterns of industries, governing factors, growth rate, and competitive analysis of the market, growth opportunities, challenges, investment strategies, and forecasts till 2026. The Testosterone Booster Market was estimated at USD XX Million/Billion in 2016 and is estimated to reach USD XX Million/Billion by 2026, expanding at a rate of XX% over the forecast period. To calculate the market size, the report provides a thorough analysis of the market by accumulating, studying, and synthesizing primary and secondary data from multiple sources.

To get Incredible Discounts on this Premium Report, Click Here @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=230530&utm_source=COD&utm_medium=888

The market is predicted to witness significant growth over the forecast period, owing to the growing consumer awareness about the benefits of Testosterone Booster. The increase in disposable income across the key geographies has also impacted the market positively. Moreover, factors like urbanization, high population growth, and a growing middle-class population with higher disposable income are also forecasted to drive market growth.

According to the research report, one of the key challenges that might hinder the market growth is the presence of counter fit products. The market is witnessing the entry of a surging number of alternative products that use inferior ingredients.

Key factors influencing market growth:

Reasons for purchasing this Report from Market Research Intellect

Customized Research Report Using Corporate Email Id @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/need-customization/?rid=230530&utm_source=COD&utm_medium=888

Customization of the Report:

Market Research Intellect also provides customization options to tailor the reports as per client requirements. This report can be personalized to cater to your research needs. Feel free to get in touch with our sales team, who will ensure that you get a report as per your needs.

Thank you for reading this article. You can also get chapter-wise sections or region-wise report coverage for North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East & Africa.

To summarize, the Testosterone Booster market report studies the contemporary market to forecast the growth prospects, challenges, opportunities, risks, threats, and the trends observed in the market that can either propel or curtail the growth rate of the industry. The market factors impacting the global sector also include provincial trade policies, international trade disputes, entry barriers, and other regulatory restrictions.

About Us:

Market Research Intellect provides syndicated and customized research reports to clients from various industries and organizations with the aim of delivering functional expertise. We provide reports for all industries including Energy, Technology, Manufacturing and Construction, Chemicals and Materials, Food and Beverage and more. These reports deliver an in-depth study of the market with industry analysis, market value for regions and countries and trends that are pertinent to the industry.

Contact Us:

Mr. Steven Fernandes

Market Research Intellect

New Jersey ( USA )

Tel: +1-650-781-4080

Go here to read the rest:
Testosterone Booster Market 2019 Break Down by Top Companies, Countries, Applications, Challenges, Opportunities and Forecast 2026 - Cole of Duty


Jun 10

Why Do Men Suffer from Coronavirus at a Higher Rate than Women? – The National Interest

When it comes to surviving critical cases of COVID-19, it appears that men draw the short straw.

Initial reports from China revealed the early evidence of increased male mortality associated with COVID. According to the Global Health 50/50 research initiative, nearly every country is now reporting significantly higher COVID-19-related mortality rates in males than in females as of June 4. Yet, current data suggest similar infection rates for men and women. In other words, while men and women are being infected with COVID-19 at similar rates, a significantly higher proportion of men succumb to the disease than women, across groups of similar age. Why is it then that more men are dying from COVID-19? Or rather, should we be asking why are more women surviving?

I am an immunologist, and I explore how stress and biological sex can impact a persons vulnerability to immune-mediated disease. I study a specific immune cell called the mast cell. Mast cells play a pivotal role in our immune systems as they act as first responders to pathogens and orchestrate immune responses that help clear the invading pathogens.

Our research shows that mast cells from females are able to initiate a more active immune response, which may help females fight off infectious diseases better than men. But the trade-off may be that women are at higher risk for allergic and inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence indicates that mast cells are activated by SARS-CoV-2 which causes COVID-19.

Some clues to why females have higher survival rates may be found in our current understanding of differences in the immune systems of men versus women.

Could sex differences in immune system play a role?

In general, females have a more robust immune response than men which may help females fight off infections better than males. This could be a result of genetic factors or sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone.

Biological females have two copies of the X chromosome, which contains more immune genes. While the genes on one X chromosome are mostly inactive, some immune genes can escape this inactivation, leading to double the number of immune-related genes and thus double the quantity of certain immune proteins compared with biological men who have only one X chromosome.

Sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone can also impact the immune response. In one study, researchers showed that activating the estrogen receptor in female mice provided them protection against SARS-CoV. And there is an approved clinical trial that will examine the effects of estrogen patches on the severity of COVID-19 symptoms.

It is, however, interesting that the current data showing that women have better survival rates than men applies to even men and women in the 80-plus age group, when hormone levels in both sexes equalize. This suggests that factors other than adult sex hormone levels are contributing to sex differences in COVID-19 mortality.

Androgens, a group of hormones - including testosterone - that are best known to stimulate the development of male characteristics and can cause hair loss, have also received recent attention as a risk factor for COVID-19 in males. In a study conducted in Italy, prostate cancer diagnosis increased the risk for COVID-19. However, prostate cancer patients who were receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), a treatment that suppresses the production of androgens which fuels prostate cancer cell growth, had a significantly lower risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection. This suggests that blocking androgens in men was protective against SARS-CoV-2 infection.

It is unknown how ADT works to reduce infection rates in men and whether this has been shown in other countries has yet to be determined. Testosterone, which is an androgen hormone has immune-suppressive effects so one explanation could be that ADT might boost the immune system to combat SARS-CoV-2 infection.

There is also evidence that males and females have different quantities of certain receptors that recognize pathogens or that serve as an invasion point for viruses like SARS-CoV-2. One example is the quantity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, which SARS-CoV-2 binds to in order to infect cells. While there is currently no conclusive evidence for a role of ACE2 receptors impacting sex differences and the severity of COVID-19 disease, it remains a potential contributing factor.

Gender, sex and COVID-19 risk

A number of factors can interact with biological sex to increase or decrease ones susceptibility to COVID-19. Another major factor is gender, which refers to social behaviors or cultural norms that society deems appropriate. Males may be at increased risk for severe disease, because in general, they tend to smoke and drink more, wash their hands less frequently and often delay seeking medical attention. All of these gender specific behaviors may put men at higher risk. While there is no current data yet on how gender plays a role in COVID-19, it will be a critically important factor to account for in order to understand sex differences in mortality.

Age, psychological stress level, coexisting conditions such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease can also interact with biological sex to increase disease.

While COVID-19 highlights the importance of biological sex in disease risk, sex biases in disease in general is not a new concept. COVID-19 is just another example of a disease that will be added to the growing list of diseases for which males or females are at increased risk.

A history of male-biased research

You might be wondering that if biological sex is so important, then why dont we know what is causing disparities in disease prevalence between the sexes and why are there no sex-specific therapies?

One major reason is when it comes to being included in scientific research, it is mostly males who have been studied.

This disparity between biological sex differences in research has only recently been remedied. It has only been in the last five years that the National Institutes of Health has required sex difference data to be collected for all newly funded preclinical research grants.

While there may be several reasons for choosing one sex over the other in research, the huge disparity that now exists is likely a major reason why we still know relatively little about sex differences in immunity, including the current COVID-19 pandemic.

This has clearly hindered advancement of womens health, but also has negative consequences for mens health. For example, given the biological differences between the sexes, it is very possible that drugs and therapies will have different effects in females than males.

Biological sex is clearly a major factor determining disease outcomes in COVID-19. Precisely how your biological sex makes you more or less resilient to diseases such as COVID-19 remains to be elucidated. Future basic research with animals and clinical trials in people need to consider biological sex as well as interactions with gender as an important variable.

[Get facts about coronavirus and the latest research. Sign up for The Conversations newsletter.]

Adam Moeser, Matilda R. Wilson Endowed Chair, Associate Professor of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Image: Reuters

Continue reading here:
Why Do Men Suffer from Coronavirus at a Higher Rate than Women? - The National Interest



Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»