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Nov 18

We Still Dont Know What Gina Haspel Really Knew About the CIAs Torture Program – VICE

The Report, a VICE-produced film, was released Friday

Trump CIA Director Gina Haspel insists the CIA learned valuable lessons from the agencys massive torture scandal, but its never been entirely clear thats actually true.

A 2014 Senate investigation and accompanying report found that between 2002 and 2008, the CIA ran a covert detention and torture program largely untethered from meaningful oversight. During that period 119 detainees were subjected to a wide range of torture from sleep deprivation and extended cold exposure to waterboarding and simulated burial.

The report found that 26 of those detainees were held "wrongfully, with some accused of crimes never committed. One died in captivity. The CIA was also found to have repeatedly lied about the nature of the program, and continued with these enhanced interrogation techniques despite knowing that torture does not produce meaningful intelligence.

The damning investigation is the focus of the looming new movie The Report, documenting the uphill battle Senate investigators like Daniel J. Jones faced as they attempted to expose the covert projectand the CIAs many falsehoods on the subjectto the bright light of day.

Despite the report and resulting scandal, a major lingering question remains to this day: how much did Gina Haspel, a 34-year CIA veteran promoted to head the agency by President Trump in early 2018, know about the program? And if she helped enable and cover it up, should she be in charge of leading the CIA toward a more accountable, ethical future?

During her confirmation testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last year, Haspel declared that the era of torture at the CIA had ended. She also insisted she didnt even know about the CIA program in 2002h.

I was not even read into the interrogation program until it had been up and running for a year, Haspell told the Committee.

But Haspels claims raised more than a few eyebrows. For one, the CIA began its torture program in the summer of 2002. By late 2002, Haspel was overseeing waterboarding at a black site detention center in Thailand, one of a number of countries exposed in a 2005 Washington Post report as territories being used for torture by the US to dodge judicial oversight.

Later reporting would reveal that Haspel also played a role in the CIAs destruction of 92 tapes related to the CIAs torture program. As such, the idea that the 34-year CIA vet wasnt fully versed inif not directly involved inthe program has long strained credulity.

During her testimony, Haspel often attempted to have it both ways, insisting that the CIA would never again embrace such a program, but refusing to clearly refudiate the obvious immorality of the era.

Having served in that tumultuous time, Haspel said, I can offer you my personal commitment, clearly and without reservation, that under my leadership, CIA will not restart such a detention and interrogation program.

The original torture program was technically ended in 2009. But whether the CIA created or will create a different type of tortune program has never been entirely clear. On the campaign trail in 2016, then candidate Trump signaled his intent to not only bring back the CIA torture program, but go further than the CIA had ever gone before.

I would bring back waterboarding, and Id bring back a hell of a lot worse than waterboarding, candidate Trump promised during a Republican primary debate in New Hampshire.

Patrick Eddington, a former CIA analyst and ex-House senior staffer, told Motherboard he doubted that Congress, Haspel, or CIA leadership had actually learned any meaningful lessons from the scandal. He pointed to the recent House passage of a plan to dramatically expand the scope of the 1982 Intelligence Identities Protection Act at the CIAs request.

While the expansion was framed by the CIA as necessary to protect the identities of covert agents, free press advocates and government transparency activists say the proposal dramatically increased any potential punishment for whistleblowers and journalists, making it harder than ever to expose future unethical CIA programs.

Republicans and Democrats alike, Eddington noted in a recent editorial, were intentionally or inadvertently helping to lay the legal groundwork for a resumption of the kind of black site madness that trashed Americas reputation abroad, produced zero actionable intelligence, and served as a recruiting tool for Salafist terrorist groups like ISIS.

Eddington told Motherboard it was certainly possible for the CIA to simply outsource torture to foreign allies.

My gut instinct says that even if CIA itself has not directly restarted a program under Haspel in which new CIA black sites are being used, I can easily see CIA persuading friendly intelligence services in the Middle East [and] Southwest Asia to render, detain and interrogate known or alleged Salafist terrorists at the United States Governments behest, he said.

Haspels links to one of the darkest scandals in American history wasnt enough to deter Congress from voting to approve her 54-45 as the next CIA director. But not everybody was enthusiastic about Haspels appointment.

Ms. Haspel's role in overseeing the use of torture by Americans is disturbing, former Senator John McCain said at the time. Her refusal to acknowledge torture's immorality is disqualifying. I believe the Senate should exercise its duty of advice and consent and reject this nomination.

A Senate majority didnt listen, and despite Haspels somewhat ambiguous pledges to the contrary, theres not much preventing the United States from repeating the mistakes of the past.

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We Still Dont Know What Gina Haspel Really Knew About the CIAs Torture Program - VICE


Nov 16

These 20-minute workouts are all you need to get in shape – CNET

All you need for a good workout is 20 minutes and some open space -- no equipment necessary.

Point blank: You're busy and it's hard to get to the gym sometimes -- OK, a lot of times. I've been there, even as a personal trainer and someone who actually enjoys exercising. Working out can often seem like an extra bullet on the never-ending to-do list, nagging at you as more of a chore than anything.

There are a lot of ways you can make exercise more attainable, such as making it fun or enlisting an accountability buddy, but when time is the issue, the best thing you can do is to just work out less.

Contrary to popular belief, you don't need to spend hours upon hours in the gym or on the road to see fitness gains. To reap the many health benefits of exercise, you just need to get your heart rate up for a bit and focus on strengthening the major muscles -- and you can do all of that in 20 minutes or less.

Read more: This is the absolute easiest way to track your workouts

Now playing: Watch this: Ring Fit Adventure is a real workout

9:52

Remember with the high-intensity interval training craze started in the mid-2010s? Trainers and exercisers everywhere started evangelizing the benefits of short, intense, interval-based workouts, and it turns out that all the preaching is based on solid science: HIIT has been proven more effective than steady-state aerobic exercise (like jogging) time and time again. HIIT may also be more effective than weight training alone, at the very least from a time standpoint.

Even exercise "snacks" -- bursts of activity as short as 20 seconds -- can seriously improve your fitness when done a few times each day.

This is largely because HIIT challenges both your cardiorespiratory fitness and your musculoskeletal fitness, bringing about improvements to your heart, lungs, muscles, nervous system and pretty much everything else.

Of course, the ideal is a balanced workout regimen that combines steady-state aerobic exercise, interval training and resistance training over the course of a week, but this article isn't for people who have time to do all that.

Read more: 3 ways to find free group workout classes

Many popular fitness programs, such as Orangetheory Fitness and CrossFit, utilize HIIT in their programming.

When it comes to short workouts, you want to focus on intensity over all else (except good form, of course).

The following elements make for effective short workouts:

Now that you know all about the benefits of short, intense workouts, it's time to put that knowledge into sweaty action -- below are five workouts you can do in less time than it takes to eat lunch. For the sake of simplicity, I designed all of these workouts as bodyweight-only sessions you can do anywhere.

Oh, and before you start: Don't skimp on your warm-up and make sure you pump up the tunes for a better burn.

Complete the following for time (as fast as possible):

Give yourself a time cap to make it more challenging.

One key to a good workout, intense or not, is good form. You'll reduce your risk of injury and improve the effectiveness of your workout.

In 20 minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of the following:

Choose your own rest intervals in between sets and rounds.

Complete the following sequence one time through (12 minutes total):

For four minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of:

For four minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of:

For four minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of:

There's a lot of fancy fitness equipment out there, like this smart Mirror, but you can get fit with just your body and some effective programming.

Complete each movement on the minute for 16 minutes (4 rounds):

Rest the remaining 20 seconds of each minute.

Now that you've worked up a sweat, learn how to recover from your workout and soothe post-workout muscle soreness with compression boots, foam rollers, massage guns and stretching.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

Link:
These 20-minute workouts are all you need to get in shape - CNET


Nov 16

Are wellness and economic growth connected? – Human Resource Executive

A new study makes a direct link between a small amount of extra physical activity and economic growth.

The value of employer-sponsored wellness programs has beendebatedever since the first employer offered to pony up with the goal of making workers healthierand, by extension, happier and more productive.

Now, a new academic study from the independent nonprofit research institute RAND Europe delivers the latest data showing a true relationship between global economic growth and physical activity, even if its not driven by a full-blown wellness program.

Related: Read all of our coverage of wellness topics here.

Commissioned by Vitality, which offers an interactive, personalized wellness program, the study reveals significant benefits to gross domestic product, workplace productivity and life expectancyif physical activity levels increase globally.

According to the study, the economic improvement would be linked to lower mortality rates (more people alive and contributing to the economy), reduced absenteeism and lower presenteeism, driven largely by the impact of physical activity on mental health. In terms of economic benefits, the study reports that if all adults aged 18-64 walked just 15 minutes more a day, the world economy could grow by an average of $100 billion a year until 2050. In addition to productivity, mortality would also improveranging from 11% to 28%. Vitality estimates this to result in 2.5 years of additional life (based on an average 40-year-old male).

This groundbreaking study provides proof of the relationship between physical activity, productivity, mortality and economic growth, said Tal Gilbert, CEO of Vitality USA, in a company statement. The stakes are enormous for the individual and for our society as a whole. This is why we are leading efforts with Vitality-linked insurers to make 100 million people 20% more active by 2025, as part of our global pledge.

Since 2015, one of those insurers, John Hancock, has partnered with Vitality to reward its life-insurance holders for healthy behaviors, such as physical activity, mindfulness, improved nutrition and preventive screenings.

When more people take small, everyday steps to improve their health and wellness, our society and global economies benefit. Were proud to be a part of this important effort, said Brooks Tingle, president and CEO of John Hancock.

RAND Europe used a dynamic, multi-country macroeconomic model to comprehensively assess the impact of physical inactivity on national economies on a consistent basis, allowing for an aggregation of the effect to the global economy. According to RAND Europe, the study followed a novel approach to synthesize the existing evidence on physical activity and mortality risk by taking study design and publication bias into account. It utilizes Vitalitys extensive proprietary data set on workplace healthderived from its Healthiest Workplace initiative in seven countriesto assess the relationship between physical activity and performance at work. It also combined the mortality and productivity effects into a single model to project the true economic cost of physical inactivity over time.

Related: Wellness program helping fight burnout

Hans Pung, president of RAND Europe, noted the significance of the study for policymakers and employers alike.

The study points to a significant relationship between inactivity and productivity loss, driven largely by ill-health-related presenteeism, he said. We hope that these insights will support policymakers and employers with new perspectives on how to enhance the productivity of their populations.

*

Learn more about the latest trends in employee wellness at HREs upcomingHealth & Benefits Leadership Conference, set for April 15-17 at the Aria in Las Vegas.

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Are wellness and economic growth connected? - Human Resource Executive


Nov 16

Anjelicas 22 Minute Workout brings back the ’80s Spandex and all – Canada.com

Anjelica Scannura hosts Anjelica's 22 Minute WorkoutOneTV

Remember the 20 Minute Workout? In the 1980s, the aerobics show featured Spandex-clad women purring suggestive instructions and doing cheeky exercises while cameras leered nearby. Basically, for a certain segment of the population, it invoked sweat for decidedly non-aerobic reasons.

But, it was fun. Not only did you get a good workout, but the music was catchy and you knew the instructors by name. That combination is exactly whats missing from the fitness landscape today, says Anjelica Scannura, who hosts a throwback to 20 Minute Workout and other 80s exercise shows on OneTV.

There are so many boot camps and hardcore workout programs out there. Ive seen a lot of people change their bodies from it, but Ive also seen people busting gaskets because its so hard. And then I see apps that are practical but dont offer any character development with the host, she says.

Basically I longed for a time where exercise was whimsical and fun. I thought the 80s was a pivotal time in fitness where aerobics and tightly formatted exercise programs were just starting to become a global phenomenon Jane Fonda, Richard Simmons and fashion and music went hand in hand. A light bulb went off in my head.

The result was Anjelicas 22 Minute Workout, which airs twice daily on OneTV. Some parts of it are pure 80s white background, revolving platform, retro beats, tongue-in-cheek moves and plenty of Spandex. But technological updates (calorie counter, step counter, countdown clock) and more diversity bring it into 2019.

I wanted to make it modernized and more inclusive of people of all kinds. Those 80s fitness shows only had one kind of person. And while I really admired the esthetic of that era, the update was much called for, says Scannura, who also writes, choreographs and associate-produces the series.

I really wanted to showcase a vast array of people that are from everywhere, that have different stories, experiences, and they range from pro athletes to older people. We also have men.

Scannura, who also hosts Anjelicas Dance Workout on OneTV, has always made fitness a priority. She started dancing professionally at age five, took Irish dancing for years and is part of her familys flamenco dance ensemble her mom even appears on her new show. She also won the Belly Dancer of the Universe competition in 2013, no big deal.

But constantly setting foot to stage took its toll.

Recently I got injured, she says. OK, my injuries started when I was 18 years old, but when youre that age, you think youre invincible. Then all of a sudden youre frickin 28 years old and you cant get up in the morning without everything cracking.

So in addition to developing Anjelicas 22 Minute Workout, Scannura has been branching out into acting and standup comedy but still teaching and performing dance always with balance.

Throughout the show you see that Im not living off of green smoothies all friggin day. Sometimes I have a bad night, I drink a beer, I have five A&W hamburgers. What are you going to do? I think thats why people get so afraid of working out, because they expect so much from themselves so soon, she says.

But I just ask for 22 minutes and I dont take it too seriously. Its on twice a day, and there are 30 episodes. Some are more challenging than others. Some youll feel like youre rocking it and some you know youll have something to work on. Its always going to be there for you.

Anjelicas 22 Minute Workout airs twice daily on OneTV

See the rest here:
Anjelicas 22 Minute Workout brings back the '80s Spandex and all - Canada.com


Nov 16

National Family Caregivers Month: What You Need to Know – Curetoday.com

For National Family Caregivers Month, heres a round-up of the latest news and updates that focus on the friends and family members that take up the role of caregiver when their loved ones need them most.

BY Jessica Skarzynski

PUBLISHED November 15, 2019

See the original post:
National Family Caregivers Month: What You Need to Know - Curetoday.com


Nov 16

What’s happening: week of Nov. 14 – Cloverdale Reporter

THIS WEEK

Get Up and Go! Free Try it Session: Nov. 14, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; The Kennedy will be hosting a free Get up & Go! session to promote registered programs for January. Get Up & Go! provides an entry level exercise program for seniors with balance and mobility impairment who would otherwise be unable to attend a community based exercise class. Come see if this is the right exercise program for you at no cost. To register or for more information, please call 604-594-2717.

Addiction and Harm Reduction Parent Information Night with Guy Felicella: Nov. 14, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Seaquam Secondary School theatre, 11584 Lyon Rd.; Guy Felicella grew up in a middle class home in Richmond but fell into addiction at a young age. Guy spent 30 years in the repeated cycle of gangs, addiction, treatment and jail. He spent nearly 20 years residing in a two block radius in the Downtown Eastside and using many resources, including harm reduction, to keep himself alive. Today, Guy has escaped the grips of the turmoil that kept him suffering and resides with his wife and two young children, with multiple years of recovery and sobriety under his belt. Guy is passionate about advocating for the vulnerable people who still suffer in addiction and educating communities on harm reduction to eliminate the stigma that exists around it. Currently, Guy works for Vancouver Coastal Health, B.C.s Ministry of Mental Health and Addiction, and the BC Centre on Substance Use. Parents and youth are welcome.

Snow Angels Information Session: Nov. 14, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; North Delta Recreation Centre; Join us for an information session that will assist you in becoming a Delta Snow Angel. You will fill out a registration form, receive police information check forms and discover how you can complete all the steps to become a part of our team. If you are 13-17 years old, please attend with someone over the age of 19 that will be supervising you during your volunteer shifts. Group leaders will need to attend in order to receive the forms to take back to your team/group. You will receive a 1.5 hour volunteer credit for attending one of these sessions. It is not mandatory that you stay the full 1.5 hours, you will only need to stay until your registration process is complete and we answer any questions you may have.

Anticipating Special Occasions & Holidays While Grieving: Nov. 14, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Centre for Supportive Care, 4631 Clarence Taylor Cres., Ladner; The Delta Hospice Society is hosting a free presentation on navigating holidays and other special occasions while grieving a loved one. For more information and to pre-registration, call 604-948-0660 or email debra@deltahospice.org.

Bernie & Red: Nov. 15, 7 p.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; Bernie & Red are musical humorists who have delighted audiences worldwide for more than 35 years. Frequent comparisons to The Smothers Brothers, Bette Midler, Johnny Carson and Benny Hill notwithstanding, these two are originals, blending their English humour (theyre originally from Liverpool, where they met and married over 50 years ago) with observations about Canada, family life, the joys of senior travel and marriage, in a package that is accessible to all. Veterans of the Western Canadian entertainment scene, they have built a large and faithful following, and have released more than a dozen CDs and an autobiography/songbook, Our Story, which contains the lyrics to 20 of their original comedy songs. Their music covers every era, but mostly those classics that you remember from the 50s and 60s, and their comedy is aimed fairly and squarely at the over-55 age group. This show is not to be missed. The evening will include a dinner at 7 p.m., followed by the show at 8:15 p.m. For more information, call 604-599-6744. For more on Bernie & Red, head to bernieandred.com.

Vaping, Substance Use and the Importance of Connection: Nov. 19, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Delta Manor Education Centre, 4750 57th St., Ladner; Parents and youth, please join us for an informative evening of learning presented by Fraser Health and the Delta Police Department about vaping, substance use and the importance of connection. This evening presentation is facilitated by the Delta School District, in partnership with Fraser Health and the Delta Police Department. Door prizes and refreshments will be available for participants.

Childcare Community Engagement Meeting: Nov. 20, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Harris Barn, 4140 Arthur Dr., Ladner; The City of Delta will be holding community engagement meetings in North and South Delta to provide residents with the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas, and solutions for how to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of childcare in Delta. Residents will also receive an update on the current status of the Delta Childcare Needs Assessment. We look forward to seeing you there.

Osteofit Free Try-it Session: Nov. 21, 9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; The Kennedy will be hosting free Osteofit try-it sessions to promote a course that will be offered in January. Osteofit is a certified exercise, education and falls prevention program for individuals with osteoporosis, low bone density or who are at risk of fractures and falls. Osteofit aims to provide safe and gentle exercises for individuals with minimal previous exercise experience. Find out if this is the program for you at no cost. To register, please contact 604-594-2717.

ICBC Safe Driving for Seniors: Nov. 21, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; Kennedy Seniors Society welcomes ICBC to present essential information to help keep seniors safe on the road. Also, learn about the governments new Enhanced Road Assessment (ERA) program that evaluates ones ability to safely operate a motor vehicle. This is a free event. Please call the Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre at 604-594-2717 for more information or to register.

Fluterrific: Nov. 24, 2 p.m.; North Delta Centre for the Arts, 11425 84th Ave.; This is the sixth year for this afternoon of flute music co-sponsored by the City of Delta. Enjoy a concert with a local flute ensemble performing baroque, classical, Broadway and Latin music. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Tickets are $10, free for children 10 years and under. To register, call 604-952-3000. Note: if the North Delta Centre for the Arts is not ready in time, the show will instead be held next door at the North Delta Recreation Centre.

Books and Games at the Library: Nov. 25, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Game on in the library. Play board games while library staff creates a personalized book list based on your favourite titles or subjects. Everyone welcome.

Childcare Community Engagement Meeting: Nov. 27, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; George Mackie Library; The City of Delta will be holding community engagement meetings in North and South Delta to provide residents with the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas, and solutions for how to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of childcare in Delta. Residents will also receive an update on the current status of the Delta Childcare Needs Assessment. We look forward to seeing you there.

Personal Emergency Preparedness Workshop: Nov. 28, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; North Delta Recreation Centre; This free personal preparedness workshop will teach you the risks, how to make an emergency plan, and what to do in an emergency or disaster. Register at deltareg.ca (barcode: 437192) or by calling 604-952-3000.

Osteofit Free Try-it Session: Nov. 30, 9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; The Kennedy will be hosting a free Osteofit try-it session to promote a course that will be offered in January. Osteofit is a certified exercise, education and falls prevention program for individuals with osteoporosis, low bone density or who are at risk of fractures and falls. Osteofit aims to provide safe and gentle exercises for individuals with minimal previous exercise experience. Find out if this is the program for you at no cost. To register, please contact 604-594-2717.

Get Up and Go! Free Try it Session: Nov. 30, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; The Kennedy will be hosting a free Get up & Go! session to promote registered programs for January. Get Up & Go! provides an entry level exercise program for seniors with balance and mobility impairment who would otherwise be unable to attend a community based exercise class. Come see if this is the right exercise program for you at no cost. To register or for more information, please call 604-594-2717.

Canskate Bring a Friend Day: Dec. 1, 9:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.; Sungod Recreation Centre; Join us for Bring a Friend Day of Canskate! All skaters aged 3-12 are welcome to join us. The rental shop will be open for complementary skates and helmets and our coaching team will be on-ice leading lessons and games. We hope to see your skater and their friends for this fun session.

Celebrate-a-Life Tribute Card Event: Dec. 2-31, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Centre for Supportive Care, 4631 Clarence Taylor Cres., Ladner; This event offers an opportunity to honour those who are important to you whether they have passed, or are in your minds and hearts during difficult times. Visit between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., Monday to Friday.

Canskate Bring a Friend Day: Dec. 3, 5:15 p.m. to 6:45 p.m.; Sungod Recreation Centre; Join us for Bring a Friend Day of Canskate! All skaters aged 3-12 are welcome to join us. The rental shop will be open for complementary skates and helmets and our coaching team will be on-ice leading lessons and games. We hope to see your skater and their friends for this fun session.

Vaping, Substance Use and the Importance of Connection: Dec. 3, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Seaquam Secondary School, 11584 Lyon Rd.; Parents and youth, please join us for an informative evening of learning presented by Fraser Health and the Delta Police Department about vaping, substance use and the importance of connection. This evening presentation is facilitated by the Delta School District, in partnership with Fraser Health and the Delta Police Department. Door prizes and refreshments will be available for participants.

Holiday Hazards Cat-Proof Your Home: Dec. 5, 6:30 p.m.; Delta Community Animal Shelter, 7505 Hopcott Rd.; This class is free. Class space is limited so register early. Minimum registration of five people per class. To register, call 604-940-7111. Hosted by DCAS.

Acrylic Art with Dawn: Dec. 7, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; Come spend an afternoon with Dawn and let your creativity and inner artist shine. No experience is necessary in this fun and relaxing atmosphere. Dawn will take you through the steps to build your masterpiece from the blank canvas to a beautiful finished product you will be proud to display. Class costs $15 and all supplies are provided. All that is required is an open mind and a creative heart. To register, please contact 604-594-2717.

Christmas Concert: Dec. 17, 7 p.m.; North Delta Arts Centre, 11425 84th Ave.; Come enjoy a free holiday concert featuring the Delta Concert Band and a local choir. Entry by donation to the food bank. This is an all ages event.

Maker Monday: Mondays through Dec. 2, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Start the week creatively. If youre between the ages of 8 and 12, drop in for Maker Monday and engineer something with KEVA Planks. Something new will be designed and made each week; you could be constructing cardboard structures on Sept. 23 or creating Robot Art on Sept. 30. Some of the other amazing things well be doing are designing electronic inventions with Makey Makey and building with Magformers.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly: Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Deltassist, 9097 120th St.; A non-profit organization. We have a friendly group to help you lose weight. For more info call Eileen Labron at 604-596-0233.

Kennedy Seniors Choir: Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.; Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre; Janette Sobkowicz, choirmaster with a bachelors of music degree and 20 years of experience teaching music and conducting choirs, starts the newest program at Kennedy Seniors Recreation Centre. Join Janette and seniors from the centre in singing and socializing. For more information please call 604-594-2717 or visit the centres customer service desk. Please note: this drop-in activity requires a punch pass.

Storytime: Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays through Dec. 6, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. (Tuesdays and Fridays) and 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. (Sundays); George Mackie Library; Introduce kids to the love of books and language with Storytime. Children and caregivers will enjoy interactive stories, songs, rhymes and more. Storytime prepares children to learn to read. Suitable for ages 2 to 6 years.

Relaxation Circle: Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.; Centre for Supportive Care, 4631 Clarence Taylor Cres., Ladner; Are you an adult living with cancer or serious illness and would like to relax body and mind? Then join the Centre for Supportive Cares free Relaxation Circle where you will learn and practice relaxation techniques and experience soothing touch by volunteers, guided imagery and live music by our music therapist. Open to family members and friends too. No need to register, just show up! For more info, call 604-948-0660.

Suicide Grief Support Group: Tuesdays through to Dec. 3, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.; Centre for Supportive Care, 4631 Clarence Taylor Cres., Ladner; Recent loss due to suicide and want the support of others in similar circumstances? Join a free adult suicide grief support group where you can share your feelings and thoughts in a safe and supportive environment, learn about coping strategies and resources, and develop community with others. For more info and to pre-register, call 604-948-0660.

Settlement Workers Punjabi/English: Alternate Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Are you a newcomer to Canada who needs help adjusting to your new life? Free and confidential services are offered to help newcomers with all their needs during the process of settling into their new community. Settlement and integration services are free for immigrants, refugees and their families in B.C.

Lego Club: Tuesdays through Nov. 26, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Love Lego? We provide the Lego, you bring your imagination. Come play, create, and experiment. Lego Club is a fun afternoon program for kids. Children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult.

Recovery International Weekly Meetings: Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; North Delta Evangelical Free Church, 11300 84th Ave.; Recovery International is a weekly community-based self-help mental health group that offers tools and techniques that participants can use to deal with depression, anxiety, impulse control, anger management and a variety of other nervous and mental health issues. Meetings are led by trained group leaders.

Bridge at East Delta Hall: Wednesdays, 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursdays, 9:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; East Delta Hall, 10379 Ladner Trunk Rd.; The Duplicate Lite Bridge Clubs is conducting their games in Delta. Cost is $8 per session, including refreshments. First time players are invited to come give bridge a try. Register by emailing ljsimpson@telus.net or calling Lynda Simpson at 604-788-4721. For more info about the bridge clubs, visit duplicatelite.ca.

Bereavement Support Group: Wednesdays through to Nov. 13, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.; Have you recently experienced the death of a loved one? Then consider joining a safe and supportive free group for bereaved adults to share with and listen to others in similar situations, and learn to navigate their grief process. For more info and to pre-register, call 604-948-0660.

Settlement Workers Arabic/Mandarin/English: Alternate Wednesdays, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Are you a newcomer to Canada who needs help adjusting to your new life? Free and confidential services are offered to help newcomers with all their needs during the process of settling into their new community. Settlement and integration services are free for immigrants, refugees and their families in B.C.

Supporting Family Resilience Group: Wednesdays, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Delta office Canadian Mental Health Association Vancouver-Fraser, 4871 Delta St.; The Canadian Mental Health Association Vancouver-Fraser offers a no-cost support group for parents and caregivers of youth and young adults who are working through mental health and/or substance use concerns. Facilitated by both peers and counsellors, the group meets weekly at our Delta office. Please register prior to your first meeting by phone: 604-943-1878, or email: info.delta@cmha.bc.ca.

Restorative Yoga For People Living with Cancer: Thursdays, through to Nov. 28, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Centre for Supportive Care, 4631 Clarence Taylor Cresc., Ladner; Join a free yoga group where body, breath and mind come together in fully supported reclining yoga positions. Yoga experience is not necessary. For more info and to pre-register, call 604-948-0660.

Babytime: Thursdays until Dec. 5, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; George Mackie Library; Make language fun, and start early with Babytime. Help your baby develop speech and language skills. Enjoy bouncing, singing, rhyming and stories. Babytime is a fun, social bonding activity for babies and caregivers. Suitable for babies 23 months and younger.

Parent Time: Thursdays through Dec. 5, 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.; George Mackie Library; Relax and mingle after the fun social bonding activity of Babytime. Parent Time provides parents and caregivers an opportunity to meet other parents, learn new parenting skills, share information and resources. Suitable for parents of babies 23 months and younger. Schedule: Nov. 14 breastfeeding clinic; Nov. 21 public health nurse; Nov. 28 speech and language with Fraser Health; Dec. 5 breastfeeding clinic.

Restorative Yoga For People Living with Cancer: Thursdays through Nov. 28, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Centre for Supportive Care, 4631 Clarence Taylor Cresc., Ladner; Join a free yoga group where body, breath and mind come together in fully supported reclining yoga positions. Yoga experience is not necessary. For more info and to pre-register, call 604-948-0660.

Mental Health Resiliency Support Group: Second and fourth Thursday of each month, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.; South Delta; Canadian Mental Health Association Vancouver-Fraser offers a mental health resiliency support group in South Delta for individuals living with a mental health concern or experiencing symptoms. Please call the Delta office at 604-943-1878 or email info.delta@cmha.bc.ca to register for your first meeting.

Knit & Stitch: Fridays, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Pack up your needles and yarn, crocheting or any other projects and head to the library. Join members of all ages and abilities to share ideas, techniques and good conversation.

Teen Advisory Group: First Thursday of each month, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.; George Mackie Library; TAG is a group of committed teens (ages 13-19) who volunteer their time and energy to help staff develop teen-oriented programs, assist at library events and act as library representatives in North Deltas teen community. Membership is a resume booster and helps earn volunteer hours. There is time to socialize and plan. Did we mention that there is free food? If interested, apply at the library.

Evening Book Club: Second Tuesday of the month, 7:15 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Join us to discuss books in a casual setting. New members are welcome. Books are provided.

Poetry Night in Punjabi: Third Tuesday of the month, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Come hear two published poets/authors read and discuss their work and answer questions from the audience. Held in collaboration with Kendri Punjabi Lekhak Sabha, Uttari Amrika and Punjabi Lekhak Manch Vancouver.

Cubetto Storytime: Third Saturday of the month, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; George Mackie Library; The little ones can get into the action with Cubetto Storytim. Cubetto is a friendly wooden robot that offers a fun first step into the world of programming while encouraging imagination. Kids aged 3-5 can use Cubetto to learn the basics of coding, logic and pattern recognition. There are no screens to stare at and no reading to do. Join Cubetto for a fun, hands-on storytime every third Saturday of the month until November.

Teen Night Pizza & Games: Fourth Tuesday of the month, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Do you love to play board games? Are you between 12 and 19 years old? Then come to the library for a fun night of gaming and free pizza provided by Imperial Hobbies.

Afternoon Book Club: Fourth Thursday of the month, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Join us to discuss books in a casual setting. New members welcome and books provided.

Crossroads United Church Monthly Community Dinner: Fourth Saturday of every month, doors open at 4:30 p.m., dinner starts at 5 p.m.; Crossroads United Church, 7655 120th St.; Crossroads United Church invites you to their monthly community dinner. Come and enjoy this free nutritious meal served in a casual, safe environment. It is a sit-down served meal and is open to anyone who would benefit from good food in a safe, family-friendly setting. For more info go to crossroads-united-church.ca.

Baby Bump Book Club: Last Monday of the month, 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; George Mackie Library; Are you a mom-to-be? Have you heard about the new Baby Bump Book Club at the Mackie Library? Check it out on the last Monday of the month. This group is very organic; it can be whatever you need it to be.

Preschool Science Storytime: Last Friday of the month through to Nov. 29, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; George Mackie Library; Join us the last Friday of every month for a special Preschool Science Storytime. A different subject will be featured every month and will include a story (fiction or non-fiction), a group re-telling of the science aspects of the story and a hands-on activity. Lets build preschoolers to become not only good readers but inquisitive citizens too.

Prostate Cancer Support Group Surrey: Last Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (except July and Dec.); Valley View Memorial Gardens, 14644 72 Ave., Surrey; PCSG Surrey provides awareness, support and education for the prevention, treatment and cure for men diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer in Delta, Surrey, Langley and White Rock. Spouses and guests are welcome. For additional info visit procansupport.com or call 604 574-4012.

Book A Librarian in Punjabi and Hindi: Available by appointment; George Mackie Library; Learn how to download books from the library, find what you need on the library website, research and learn using the librarys computer-based services, what books you might like based on your interests, basic internet and basic computer. Book your personalized 30-minute session by phone (604-594-8155) or in person.

Delta Music Makers Concert Band: Did you have fun playing in a band in high school? If so, dust off your instrument, contact Curt Jantzen (cjband7@gmail.com), then join us in Ladner Tuesday evenings. The Delta Music Makers Concert Band is a fun group of adults who love to rehearse and play concerts in the community. Especially needed now are trumpets and clarinets, or any instrument except alto sax (that section is full).

Delta Scottsdale Lions Club: Second and fourth Tuesday of each month; The Lions Club is a service club that welcomes both ladies and men. If you would like to be involved in helping in your community, join us on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month (not mandatory) at the Delta Golf Course. For more info call Al at 604-594-8783.

Canadian Federation of University Women, North Delta/Surrey: CFUW is a national non-partisan, voluntary, self-funded organization working to improve the status of women and to promote human rights, public education, social justice and peace. Every year, CFUW and its clubs award close to $1 million to women to help them pursue post-secondary studies and also provide funding for library and creative arts awards. CFUW clubs provide learning and fellowship through lecture series, book clubs and issues groups, work to prevent violence against women and child poverty, and promote early learning and child care. North Delta/Surrey club meets monthly and is open to all women graduates, students and associates. Call Barb (604-594-6145) or Eleanor (604-589-3631), or email northdeltasurreycfuw@gmail.com for info.

North Delta Newcomers and Friends: NDNF is a ladies social club. Please call and arrange to attend some of our morning walks, coffee times, stitch-and-chats, card games, par-3 golf, potlucks and monthly dinners. For more info please call Kathy (604-583-3691) or Diane (604-543-7345).

Gamblers Anonymous: Has gambling taken over your life or the life of someone you know? Call 1-855-222-5542 to take back your life. Gamblers Anonymous is a non-profit fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem. Call 1-855-222-5542, email friend@gabc.ca or visit gabc.ca for more info.

editor@northdeltareporter.comLike us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

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What's happening: week of Nov. 14 - Cloverdale Reporter


Nov 16

Scientists say nature therapies don’t just feel good they save trillions in health costs – KOSU

The impact can feel immediate. Anecdotally, walking outside and into sunshine feels reinvigorating.

Science has long proven this to be true: Research shows that time spent outdoors can reduce stress, improve cognition and increase sleep quality. Now, a new study has put a dollar value on the improvement in well-being due to park visits.

Researchers at Griffith University in Australia suggest that national parks and protected areas save an approximate $6 trillion globally in mental health care costs. Lead study author Ralf Buckley said while that is a conservative estimate, its still 10 times greater than the global value of park tourism and 100 times greater than the global value of park agency budgets.

Researchers surveyed a population-representative sample of nearly 20,000 in the Australian states of Queensland and Victoria. Study participants described their own mental health and reported how often they visit parks both recently and over the span of their life. Buckley said his team then used a statistical regression technique to identify what proportion of their well-being was due to park visits, he added.

The researchers found that 2.5 to 3% of a persons mental health is based on how often they visit parks. While the percentage seems low, its about the same as the effect of additional income on a persons mental health, according to the study.

The researchers found that 2.5 to 3% of a persons mental health is based on how often they visit parks. While the percentage seems low, its about the same as the effect of additional income on a persons mental health.

Global estimates

Researchers calculated what they define as the "health services value" for Australia's national parks to be about $100 billion before extrapolating the figure to a global scale. Their findings suggest that national parks contribute about $6 billion to the global economy, though the figure ranges anywhere between $5-31 trillion per year. The big range is a reflection of the researchers caution in what the numbers mean exactly.

You can scale up by mental health factors; quality-adjusted life years; population. You can scale up by GDP. You can scale up by number of park visits, Buckley said. We dont know which will prove to be the best scaling factor. Depending which of those factors we use, we get a different number. And thats why we have that big range.

Ideally, Buckley said, he and his team would have identical studies in countries worldwide and added up the numbers.

A mere 20 minutes

The study adds to a growing body of research that quantifies the economic benefits of being outside. A 2016 study in England looked at green exercise, which include activities done outside, such as dog walking, running, horseback riding and mountain biking. Researchers estimated that these green activities can save around $2.7 billion per year.

But committing to a hiking trip every weekend is not necessary to reap these rewards. Previous research has shown that spending a mere 20 minutes in a park even if you sit on a bench and dont exercise is enough to improve a persons mental health.

Studies show that being outside is good for your physical health, as well. Research published in 2016 suggests nearly 10% of people with high blood pressure could regulate their levels by going outside for at least 30minutes every week.

Scientists have also found nature to have a psychological effect on humans well-being. Researchers at Chiba University in Japan pointed to the fact that of the 7 million years of human evolution, less than 0.01% of our species history has been spent in modern surroundings.

The gap between the natural setting, for which our physiological functions are adapted, and the highly urbanized and artificial setting that we inhabit is a contributing cause of the stress state in modern people, the 2016 Chiba University study said. In the future, the researchers added, long-term data over days, weeks, and months will be needed to clarify natures impact on humans physiology.

Considering the significance of quality of life in our modern stressful society, the importance of nature therapy will further increase. The therapeutic effects of natural stimulation suggest a simple, accessible, and cost-effective method to improve the quality of life and health of modern people, the study continued.

Some countries have long known about the healing effects of nature. One of the most long-standing nature therapies in transcontinental Japan and China is shinrin-yoku, or forest therapies. Chiba Universitys Miyazaki Yoshifumi is widely considered to be the father of shinrin-yoku.

Professor Emerita Margaret Hansen of the University of San Francisco, is a self-proclaimed nature enthusiast who learned about shinrin-yoku in 2015. Shinrin-yoku is an ancient Japanese practice that surfaced in the 1980s, when the Japanese government started to act on its citizens highly stressed state. The government began developing forest bathing areas throughout Japan, focusing efforts in urban areas where green space is more rare.

In 2017, she published a review of 63 scientific articles primarily out of Japan, Korea and China that studied forest bathing and nature therapys impact. Her mission was to educate health professionals in the United States about the therapy so they could contemplate using it in practice.

In 2018, Hansen traveled to Chiba University in Japan to meet with Yoshifumi. There, she walked the first-ever forest therapy path developed by the government. But, Hansen said, forest therapy is not just about being active; its about really slow movement through a forest.

The Japanese practice is using all of your five senses. Even cupping your ears to bring in more sound of nature. Or doing some exercises to enhance your peripheral vision when youre in nature, Hansen said. Smelling taking some leaves or pine cones and crunching them and putting them up to your nose.

The Japanese practice is using all of your five senses. Even cupping your ears to bring in more sound of nature. Or doing some exercises to enhance your peripheral vision when youre in nature. Smelling taking some leaves or pine cones and crunching them and putting them up to your nose.

Margaret Hansen

Buckley said nature-based therapies should be designed, insured and prescribed more often. More and more providers are joining the trend.

Protecting and maintaining US national parks

Both Buckley and Hansen said its largely the governments responsibility to secure budgets for park agencies and protect natural lands, which often suffer from budgetary constraints, the researchers noted.

Chelsea Sullivan, public affairs specialist at the National Park Service, said in an emailed statement to The World that the improvements to visitor facilities, campgrounds, trails, and backbone infrastructure are essential to providing a world-class experience to our more than 300 million annual visitors. Addressing the $11.9 billion in backlogged maintenance in our national parks is critical to our core mission and remains a top priority.

Sullivan added that NPS supports the link the researchers identified between enjoyable recreation experiences and healthy landscapes, through programs like the Healthy Parks Healthy People initiative, noting that these needed to be balanced with preservation and conservation needs.

Now retired from teaching, Hansen is training to be a forest therapy guide through the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy. She continues to research forest bathing, though, and is currently analyzing the tie between nature and a persons spirituality. While researchers continue to test the link between nature and well-being, Hansen said the connection is simple and it makes sense.

I cant get enough of nature, she said. Im not going to stop.

From The World 2019

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Scientists say nature therapies don't just feel good they save trillions in health costs - KOSU


Nov 15

Friday Frontline: Cancer Updates, Research and Education on November 15, 2019 – Curetoday.com

From the latest report on the State of Lung Cancer to NASA-style workouts for patients with cancer, heres what is making headlines in the cancer space this week.

The pharmaceutical company Teva USA announced Wednesday that it will resume production of vincristine, an injectable chemotherapy drug used to treat 80% of childhood cancer cases. In March, Teva decided to halt production citing that Pfizer, another pharmaceutical company, produced more of the drug.

Health care professionals and parents called for action, sending petitions to the White House and Teva. Many are glad to hear about Tevas decision, but the company has not confirmed a production start date.

The State of Lung Cancer report released by the American Lung Association this week found an increase in the number of people surviving lung cancer in the United States.

The report showed that the five-year survival rate is 21.7%, up from 17.2% 10 years ago. However, lung cancer survival rates still vary greatly depending on where a person lives, according to the findings. For instance, Utah has the lowest lung cancer rates compared with Kentucky, which has the highest.

The report found that lung cancer rates for every measure vary significantly by state, and that every state can do more to defeat lung cancer, such as increasing the rate of screening among those at high risk, addressing disparities in receipt of treatment, decreasing exposure to radon and secondhand smoke and eliminating tobacco use, the researchers concluded.

Googles new partnership with one of the countrys largest nonprofit health systems has sparked a federal inquiry.

The Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Health and Human Services said it wants to learn more about the mass collection of individuals medical records (by Google and Ascension) to ensure that HIPAA protections were fully implemented.

Earlier this week, The Wall Street Journal reported on Googles Project Nightingale in collaboration with Ascension, which operates 2,600 facilities in 21 states. The partnership has allowed the tech giant to collect identifiable health data on 50 million Americans, including those with cancer, without their knowledge or the knowledge of their doctors in an effort to build tools that can offer new insights and care suggestions for patients.

Its a concept that sounds out of this world, but researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center believe a NASA-style workout program may benefit patients with cancer.

The researchers explained in commentary published in Cell that astronauts experience similar side effects during a space flight as patients do while undergoing chemotherapy, such as changes in muscle density and in the immune system, as well as a space fog, which is similar to chemo brain that patients often describe after treatment.

To help combat these effects, astronauts are given individualized exercise programs before, during and after a mission.

The researchers are testing the exercise regimen in a clinical trial by conducting a cardiorespiratory fitness test, providing treadmills to patients in their homes and remotely monitoring them using iPads. Although the routine is typically done three to five times a week, researchers explained that the regimens are not one-size-fits-all.

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Friday Frontline: Cancer Updates, Research and Education on November 15, 2019 - Curetoday.com


Nov 15

The Many Benefits of, and Barriers to, Exercise in Patients With Rheumatologic Diseases – AJMC.com Managed Markets Network

Exercise can be a potent therapy for patients with rheumatologic diseases and can result in improvements in inflammation, disease activity score, pain, stiffness, and fatigue. However, exercise needs to be modified for these patients to address the unique barriers they may have compared with the general population, said panelists during a session at the American College of Rheumatologys annual meeting.

Rikke Helene Moe, PT, MSc, PhD, chair of health professional in rheumatology in the European League Against Rheumatism and a researcher of the national advisory unit on rehabilitation in rheumatology in the Department of Rheumatology at the Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Oslo, Norway, explained that in the past, there was a fear that exercise would increase symptoms and decrease response, and she admitted to being part of that shady past.

We advised people to rest, which resulted in them lying in hospital beds day in and day out, she said.

People with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) are less activate than the general population, which is already fairly inactive30% of people globally are insufficiently physically active, and more than 50% of people with RMDs are less active than the recommended 30 minutes per day, Moe said.

Intensity of exercise also matters, and positive effects are greater at higher intensities, but the exercises have to be individually tailored. Its easy to put everyone in the same box and have them do the same exercise, but the likely result is that most people wont follow through, she said. For instance, clinicians have to be patient when working with someone who has fibromyalgia. It will take these patients more time to reach adequate levels of exercise and activity.

In addition to exercise helping with symptoms of RMDs, it also benefits cardiovascular health. RMDs increase the risk of cardiovascular disease because of the inactivity that comes with pain associated with RMDs, being overweight, and the side effects of drugs. Exercise clearly helps with reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in these patients.

Knowing these things is not enough, Moe admitted. We are working on implementation, working on barriers.

Modifying exercise is incredibly important for patients with chronic pain, said Kim Jones, PhD, RN, FNP, FAAN, professor and dean at Linfield College School of Nursing and research professor at the Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine.

She noted that chronic pain has to be viewed as a disease like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or diabetes, not just a symptom, so patients will stop chasing something elusive that will get rid of the pain entirely. The goals of exercise for these patients should be to improve body composition, muscular strength, power, endurance, and flexibility.

What we see in rheumatology, as we increase [exercise] intensity, unless we really know how to do it in a controlled manner, the tradeoff may be that people have more pain, they may even trip into an overtraining syndrome, where they feel depressed and more fatigued, Jones noted. So, there seems to be a tradeoff, and were figuring out where exactly that line is. And as you might guess, its going to be different for different people.

A Cochrane Review analyzed studies on exercise in patients with pain, and while the studies all varied (with lengths anywhere from 1 to 30 months and with exercises ranging from daily to weekly with varied durations and types of exercises), the review did find small to moderate improvements in physical function all studies. There were also small to moderate effects on pain severity. The impact on psychological function and quality of life varied more. Some of the studies showed a huge difference, while other barely moved the needle, Jones said.

For patients with RA, a lack of knowledge about the benefits of exercise on arthritis may be one barrier to physical activity, said Yvonne M. Golightly, PhD, MS, PT, assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and adjunct in the Division of Physical Therapy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The truth is, the general population has plenty of barriers to physical activity, including lack of time, not finding exercise enjoyable, concerns about injury, uncertainty of where to start, and a lack of motivation or support.

Patients with RA face all the same barriers that the general population faces, plus the additional barriers of pain, stiffness, fatigue, challenges with mobility/function, and fear of aggravating the disease or damaging their joints. In addition, Golightly noted, these patients may have a lack of advice from healthcare providers regarding physical activity because the providers themselves may feel like they have a lack of knowledge regarding programs that are appropriate.

She has studied high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in patients with arthritis, which is not high impact, so its good for the joints. In addition, HIIT may appeal to these patients because bouts of exercise can be as short 60 seconds, and in as little as 2 weeks, patients may start seeing the benefits of the exercise regimen.

Its important to emphasize the benefits of exercise by increasing knowledge for patients and providing support, Golightly said. Teaching coping strategies to overcome perceived barriers is key, as well. Patients with arthritis who are physically active and those who are physically inactive face the same barriers; the only different is that the physically inactive patients perceive those barriers to be a bigger challenge.

Teaching coping strategies is critical for overcoming perceived barriers, Golighty said. And its important to engage in conversations with patients that help them find internal motivation and change their behavior.

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The Many Benefits of, and Barriers to, Exercise in Patients With Rheumatologic Diseases - AJMC.com Managed Markets Network


Nov 15

45 & Thrive: Contraction action Key movement terms at the core of strength training programs – Kingstonist

Photo via Pixabay.

When one is new to fitness training, or returning after a significantperiod of time, then considering possible programs, meeting with personaltrainers, or even Googling various training protocols can seem daunting especially when one is trying to keep track of some of the key terminology. Its not that the fundamental ideas behindfitness training are particularly challenging, but an early barrier to comfortwith these programs can be as simple as understanding the basic terms and lingoused regularly within this world.

So today, a little primer on a few key training terms particularlyfocused on the action and movement of muscles while doing functional strengthtraining. By the way, functional strength training, the type of trainingat the core of 45 & Thrive, involves the performing of exercises againstresistance (weights, machines, body weight) in such a manner that theimprovements in strength and fitness are directly related to the movementsand activities of an individuals daily life. Put another way, we train inthe gym to make the tasks, chores, work, fun, play, and life outside the gymeasier.

Okay, lets get started. An initial concept important to the understanding of human movement is that of Anatomical Position This is the reference position for all body parts in relation to each other as standardized in the fields or medicine, anatomy, kinesiology, and personal training. In short, it is a map, or layout for the human body; standing upright, face and palms forward, feet approximately a shoulder-width apart, and arms hanging naturally at the side. From this standardized posture, body movements and indeed many of the names of body parts, are derived.

Flexion Movement at a joint, or involving multiple joints where the joint angle decreases and the body part moves away from anatomical position. Example: When we perform a bicep curl with a dumbbell, the action from start of the exercise to the point where we have curled it as far as possible, is a flexion.

Extension Movement at a joint, or involvingmultiple joints where the joint angle increases and the body partreturns to anatomical position. Example: When we perform a bicep curl with adumbbell, the action from the end of the curl portion, back to the starting(anatomical) position, is an extension.

Hyperextension Movement at a joint, or involvingmultiple joints, where the body part moves from extension beyond anatomicalposition. Example: Tilting the head/neck back beyond anatomical position likewhen we look up at the stars, or when we arch our backs beyond anatomicalposition. Hyper, meaning beyond or excessive, may also used with theterms flexion and extension to describe a movement which goes beyond anatomicalposition to an unstable or injury prone position. We try to avoid that.

Concentric Muscle Contraction The muscle(s) shortenas body segment moves through flexion. Example: When we perform a bicep curlwith a dumbbell, during the flexion phase (first half of the overallexercise) the biceps muscle undergoes concentric contraction; the musclefibres shorten as they add force to the resistance and movement occurs.

Eccentric Muscle Contraction The muscle lengthens,under tension, as it returns to anatomical position. The muscle lengthens dueto the resistance being greater than the force the muscle is producing. Thishappens as we either consciously turn off some of our muscle fibres to allowthe return motion to take place, or, when we are fatigued to the point where wecan no longer produce enough force to hold the concentrically contractedposition. Example: The controlled lowering phase of the bicep dumbbell curlresults in this type of contraction of the biceps muscle. So, the biceps muscledoes not only work as we curl the dumbbell upwards, but is also engaged as welower the weight to the starting position. During this second phase of theexercise, this additional and complementary contraction occurs, which furtherworks the muscle, and does so in a way different than a concentric flexion.

Isotonic Contractions A collective termwhich refers to the action of a muscle undergoing both concentric andeccentric contractions during exercise. Example: A complete bicep curlexercise, single repetition, from start to finish would be considered isotonic, as its fibres changed length while contracting throughout the exercise.

Isometric Contractions A muscular contraction where the length of the muscle does not change. The muscle fires or activateswith force/tension, but there is no movement at the joint. The joint remainsstatic. This might sound counter-intuitive, but we have all contracted muscles,yet no movement has occurred. Simply standing upright and holding that posturerequires muscles to contract and help hold that position, from our core,through to our legs and feet. In the gym, when we do plank exercises, or holda steady position performing a wall sit, we are doing isometric exercise.

So, there you have it. Some key terms related to strength trainingand, in particular, how we both describe and understand body movements centredaround muscle contraction through joints. Hopefully when these terms arise,either in discussion with a personal trainer, watching YouTube videos on newexercises or technique, or while reading about new training programs, an increasedfamiliarity with these terms enhances understanding, focus, and performance ofyour training routines.

Next time, I look forward to discussing how, through 45 & Thrive, we apply an understanding of the mechanics and physiology of the various types of muscle contractions to our method of functional training in order to optimize gains, minimize time spent in the gym, and be prepared to enjoy life to its fullest through robust longevity.

Until next time

Michael Patterson, M.Ed.Lift long and Prosper

Michael Patterson M.Ed, has spent 30+ years as a fitness and health professional. He holds degrees in Physical and Health Education, Psychology, and Education. Find out more about Michael and follow him on his website at http://www.45andthrive.com, and on Instagram @45andthrive. Questions and comments can be sent to mpatterson@kos.net.

*Disclaimer: The information provided and discussed in this column is based on my personal experience, studies of physical and health education and my expertise as a lifelong fitness and health professional. Any recommendations made about fitness, training, nutrition, supplements or lifestyle, or information provided through this column, should be discussed with your physician or other health-care professional.

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45 & Thrive: Contraction action Key movement terms at the core of strength training programs - Kingstonist



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