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Jul 10

Cialis daily testosterone – Cialis daily cost canada – Van Wert independent

VW independent/submitted information

DELPHOS A Delphos couple were injured in a home invasion assault that occurred Saturday morning.

David and Dianna Allemeier of 209 S. Pierce St. in Delphos were both taken to St. Ritas Medical Center in Lima for treatment of injuries received when a man gained entry to their home and reportedly assaulted them.

Delphos Police were first called out at 6:05 a.m. Saturday on a report of a suspicious person in the 300 block of Jackson Street who was knocking on doors and then walking away. However, while en route to that call, officers were informed that a man had been injured and was bleeding in the 200 block of Pierce Street.

When officers arrived on the scene, they found Allemeier bleeding from an injury to his neck. The Delphos resident said he received the injury from a man who had gained entry into his home.

Officers approached the residence and found the back door unlocked and a lot of blood at the scene. The home was secured and a K-9 and Crime Scene Unit sought from the Allen County Sheriffs Office.

Allemeier then said his wife was still in the house and officers then entered and found Mrs. Allemeier, who was also injured, in the bedroom area of the residence.

After the Allemeiers were transported to the hospital, a K-9 search was made of the area, and the house was processed by an Allen County sheriffs deputy.

No information was released on whether items were taken from the Allemeier house.

Police are currently seeking a young, skinny white male with black hair, possibly wearing cutoff shorts. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Delphos Police Department or Allen County Sheriffs Office.

The investigation is continuing, with no further information forthcoming at this time.

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Cialis daily testosterone - Cialis daily cost canada - Van Wert independent


Jul 9

How to Deal with Testosterone Decline – Mercola.com

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Power Up with this New Comprehensive Fitness Program

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By Dr. Mercola

Testosterone is an androgenic sex hormone produced by the testicles (and in smaller amounts in womens ovaries), and is often associated with manhood. Primarily, this hormone plays a great role in mens sexual and reproductive function. It also contributes to their muscle mass, hair growth, maintaining bone density, red blood cell production, and emotional health.

Although testosterone is considered a male sex hormone, women, while having it at relatively low levels, are more sensitive to its effects.

While conventional medical thought stresses that testosterone is a catalyst for prostate cancer,1 even employing castration (orchiectomy) as a form of treatment, recent findings have shown otherwise.

The prostate gland requires testosterone for it to remain at optimal condition

Testosterone levels in men naturally decline with age beginning at age 30 and continue to do so as men advance in years.

Aging-induced testosterone decline is associated with the overactivity of an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase, which converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This process simultaneously decreases the amount of testosterone in men, putting them at risk for prostate enlargement, androgenic alopecia (hair loss) and cancer.

Unfortunately, widespread chemical exposure is also causing this decline to occur in men as early as childhood, and is completely impacting their biology. Recently, for instance, both statin drugs and the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide were found to interfere with the testicles ability to produce testosterone.2

The escalating amount of chemicals being released into the environment can no longer be ignored, as these toxins are disrupting animal and human endocrine systems.

Whats even more alarming is that many of these endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have gender-bending qualities.

EDCs are everywhere. They lurk inside your house, leaching from human products such as personal hygiene products, chemical cleansers, or contraceptive drugs. They also end up in your food and drinking water, causing you to unknowingly ingest them.

EDCs pose a threat to mens health as they interfere with testosterone production, causing men to take on more feminine characteristics.

Heres one proof: in a number of British rivers, 50 percent of male fish were found to produce eggs in their testes. According to EurekAlert,3 EDCs have been entering rivers and other waterways through sewage systems for years, altering the biology of male fish. It was also found that fish species affected by EDCs had 76 percent reduction in their reproductive function.

Sexual development in both girls and boys are occurring earlier than expected. In a study published in the journal Pediatrics,4 boys are experiencing sexual development six months to two years earlier than the medically-accepted norm, due to exposure to hormone-disrupting chemicals.

Some boys even develop enlarged testicles and penis, armpit or pubic hair, as well as facial hair as early as age nine! Early puberty is not something to be taken lightly because it can significantly influence physical and psychological health, including an increased risk of hormone-related cancers. Precocious sexual development may also lead to emotional and behavioral issues, such as:

Pregnant or nursing women who are exposed to EDCs can transfer these chemicals to their child. Exposure to EDCs during pregnancy affects the development of male fetuses. Fewer boys have been born in the United States and Japan in the last three decades. The more women are exposed to these hormone-disrupting substances, the greater the chance that their sons will have smaller genitals and incomplete testicular descent, leading to poor reproductive health in the long term. EDCs are also a threat to male fertility, as they contribute to testicular cancer and lower sperm count. All of these birth defects and abnormalities, collectively referred to as Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome (TDS), are linked to the impaired production of testosterone.5

Phthalates are another class of gender-bending chemicals that can feminize men. A chemical often added to plastics, these endocrine-disrupting chemicals have a disastrous effect on male hormones and reproductive health. They are linked to birth defects in male infants and appear to alter the genital tracts of boys to be more femalelike.

Phthalates are found to cause poor testosterone synthesis by disrupting an enzyme required to create the male hormone. Women with high levels of DEHP and DBP (two types of phthalates) in their system during pregnancy were found to have sons that had feminine characteristics Phthalates are found in vinyl flooring, detergents, automotive plastics, soaps and shampoos, deodorants, perfumes, hair sprays, plastic bags and food packaging, among a long list of common products. Aside from phthalates, other chemicals that possess gender-bending traits are:

It may be unlikely to completely eliminate products with EDCs, but there are a number of practical strategies that you can try to limit your exposure to these gender-bending substances. The first step would be to stop using Teflon cookware, as EDCs can leach out from contaminated cookware. Replace them with ceramic ones. Stop eating out of cans, as the sealant used for the can liner is almost always made from powerful endocrine-disrupting petrochemicals known as bisphenols, e.g. Bisphenol A, Bisphenol S.

You should also get rid of cleaning products loaded with chemicals, artificial air fresheners, dryer sheets, fabric softeners, vinyl shower curtains, chemical-laden shampoos, and personal hygiene products. Replace them all with natural, toxin-free alternatives. Adjusting your diet can also help, since many processed foods contain gender-bending toxins. Switch to organic foods, which are cultivated without chemical interventions.

As mentioned above, your testosterone stores also decline naturally as you age. However, there are methods that can help boost your levels. Below are some options you can consider:

If you suspect that you have insufficient testosterone stores, you should have your levels tested. Issues linked to testosterone decline include:

A blood test may not be enough to determine your levels, because testosterone levels can fluctuate during the day. Once you determine that you do have low levels, there are a number of options to take. There are synthetic and bioidentical testosterone products out on the market, but I advise using bioidentical hormones like DHEA. DHEA is a hormone secreted by your adrenal glands. This substance is the most abundant precursor hormone in the human body. It is crucial for the creation of vital hormones, including testosterone and other sex hormones.

The natural production of DHEA is also age-dependent. Prior to puberty, the body produces very little DHEA. Production of this prohormone peaks during your late 20s or early 30s. With age, DHEA production begins to decline. The adrenal glands also manufacture the stress hormone cortisol, which is in direct competition with DHEA for production because they use the same hormonal substrate known as pregnenolone. Chronic stress basically causes excessive cortisol levels and impairs DHEA production, which is why stress is another factor for low testosterone levels.

It is important not to use any DHEA product without the supervision of a professional. Find a qualified health care provider who will monitor your hormone levels and determine if you require supplementation. Rather than using an oral hormone supplementation, I recommend trans-mucosal (vagina or rectum) application. Skin application may not be wise, as it makes it difficult to measure the dosage you receive. This may cause you to end up receiving more than what your body requires.

I recommend using a trans-mucosal DHEA cream. Applying it to the rectum or if you are a a woman, your vagina, will allow the mucous epithelial membranes that line your mucosa to perform effective absorption. These membranes regulate absorption and inhibit the production of unwanted metabolites of DHEA. I personally apply 50 milligrams of trans-rectal DHEA cream twice a day this has improved my own testosterone levels significantly. However, please note that I do NOT recommend prolonged supplementation of hormones. Doing so can trick your body into halting its own DHEA production and may cause your adrenals to become seriously impaired down.

Prostate hyperplasia (BPH), or simply an enlarged prostate, is a serious problem among men, especially those over age 60. As Ive pointed out, high testosterone levels are not a precursor to an enlarged prostate or cancer; rather, excessive DHT and estrogen levels formed as metabolites of testosterone are. Conventional medicine uses two classes of drugs to treat BPH, each having a number of serious side effects. These are:

According to Dr. Rudi Moerck, an expert in chemistry and drug industry insider, men who have low levels of testosterone may experience the following problems:

Instead of turning to some drug that can only ameliorate symptoms and cause additional complications, I recommend using a natural saw palmetto supplement. Dr. Moerck says that there are about 100 clinical studies on the benefits of saw palmetto, one of them being a contributed to decreased prostate cancer risk. When choosing a saw palmetto supplement, you should be wary of the brand, as there are those that use an inactive form of the plant.

Saw palmetto is a very potent supplement, but only if a high-quality source is used. Dr. Moerck recommends using an organic supercritical CO2 extract of saw palmetto oil, which is dark green in color. Since saw palmetto is a fat-soluble supplement, taking it with eggs will enhance the absorption of its nutrients.

There is also solid research indicating that if you take astaxanthin in combination with saw palmetto, you may experience significant synergistic benefits. A 2009 study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition found that an optimal dose of saw palmetto and astaxanthin decreased both DHT and estrogen while simultaneously increasing testosterone.6 Also, in order to block the synthesis of excess estrogen (estradiol) from testosterone there are excellent foods and plant extracts that may help to block the enzyme known as aromatase which is responsible producing estrogen. Some of these include white button mushrooms, grape seed extract and nettles.7

In addition to using bioidentical hormones or saw palmetto, there are two nutrients that have been found to be beneficial to testicular health and testosterone production.

Zinc

Zinc is an important mineral in testosterone production.8 Yet, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found that about 45 percent of adults over 60 have low zinc levels due to insufficient intake. Regardless of supplementation, 20 to 25 percent of older adults still had inadequate levels.9

It was found that supplementing with zinc for as little as six weeks has been shown to improve testosterone in men with low levels. On the other hand, restricting zinc dietary sources yielded to a drop in the production of the male hormone.10 Excellent sources of zinc include:

You may also take a zinc supplement to raise your levels. Just stick to a dosage of less than 40 milligrams a day. Overdosing on zinc may cause nausea or inhibit the absorption of essential minerals in your body, like copper.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D deficiency is a growing epidemic in the US, and is profoundly affecting mens health. The cholesterol-derived steroid hormone vitamin D is crucial for mens health. It plays a role in the development of the sperm cell nucleus, and helps maintain semen quality and sperm count. Vitamin D can also increase your testosterone level, helping improve your libido. Have your vitamin D levels tested using a 25(OH)D or a 25-hydroxyvitamin D test. The optimal level of vitamin D is around 50 to 70 ng/ml for adults. There are three effective sources of vitamin D:

Learn more about how to optimize your vitamin D levels by watching my 1-hour lecture on vitamin D.

Research presented at the Endocrine Societys 2012 conference discussed the link between weight and testosterone levels. Overweight men were more prone to having low testosterone levels, and shedding excess pounds may alleviate this problem. Managing your weight means you have to manage your diet. Below are some ways to jumpstart a healthy diet:

It is ideal to keep your total fructose consumption, including fructose from fruits, below 25 grams a day. If you have a chronic condition like diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol, it is wise to keep it below 15 grams per day.

For a more comprehensive look at what you should or shouldnt eat, refer to my nutrition plan.

Unlike aerobics or prolonged moderate exercise, short, intense exercise was found to be beneficial in increasing testosterone levels. The results are enhanced with the help of intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting helps boost testosterone by improving the expression of satiety hormones, like insulin, leptin, adiponectin, glucacgon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CKK), and melanocortins, which are linked to healthy testosterone function, increased libido, and the prevention of age-induced testosterone decline. When it comes to an exercise plan that will complement testosterone function and production (along with overall health), I recommend including not just aerobics in your routine, but also:

For more information on how exercise can be used as a natural testosterone booster, read my article Testosterone Surge After Exercise May Help Remodel the Mind.

The production of the stress hormone cortisol blocks the production and effects of testosterone. From a biological perspective, cortisol increases your fight or flight response, thereby lowering testosterone-associated functions such as mating, competing, and aggression. Chronic stress can take a toll on testosterone production, as well as your overall health. Therefore, stress management is equally important to a healthy diet and regular exercise. Tools you can use to stay stress-free include prayer, meditation, laughter, and yoga. Relaxation skills, such as deep breathing and visualization, can also promote your emotional health.

Among my favorite stress management tools is the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), a method similar to acupuncture but without the use of needles. EFT is known to eliminate negative behavior and instill a positive mentality. Always bear in mind that your emotional health is strongly linked to your physical health, and you have to pay attention to your negative feelings as much as you do to the foods you eat.

References:

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How to Deal with Testosterone Decline - Mercola.com


Jul 9

7 Testosterone-Boosting Foods – Mercola.com

By Dr. Mercola

Although often associated with men, the hormone testosterone is important to the health of both men and women. As you age the level of testosterone naturally produced by your body tends to decline.

Other environmental factors, such as exposure to statin medications and the herbicide Roundup, may also trigger a decline in hormone production.1,2 A low testosterone level in men is associated with prostate enlargement, androgenic alopecia (hair loss) and certain types of cancer.

Women naturally have lower levels of testosterone throughout their lives; their bodies are more sensitive to the hormone, and their health depends on the balance between estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

The resulting imbalance when women use hormone replacement therapy during menopause is one theory behind the increased rates of breast cancer experienced by those women.3

Testosterone plays a key role in the natural production of estrogen, helps maintain bone and muscle mass and contributes to libido.4

You are able to use natural methods to boost your testosterone levels and improve your overall health without triggering an imbalance in the delicate hormonal system in your body.

To produce testosterone, your body requires several different nutrients. Among the nutrients more often depleted are vitamin D3 and zinc.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is naturally present in some foods. Deficiencies can result in a wide range of symptoms because zinc is involved in a number of significant body processes.5,6

Vitamin D can be manufactured by your body when your skin is exposed to the sun. However, many people are deficient in vitamin D because of the number of hours spent indoors and the amount of sunscreen used.

I don't advocate hours of unprotected sun exposure, but your body does require regular unprotected exposure to produce vitamin D and gain other benefits. You can read more about vitamin D deficiency and how it affects your health.

Stress is a natural testosterone killer. When your body experiences stress you release cortisol, a hormone secreted by your adrenal glands. Cortisol reduces the effects of testosterone on your body. If you want to improve the effects of testosterone, then reduce your stress and cortisol levels.7

Testosterone is an important hormone to overall health, strength, sexuality and feelings of well-being. I don't advocate using synthetic testosterone replacement therapy at all.

After testing by your holistic physician and exhausting other means of naturally boosting your testosterone levels, bioidentical hormones may be beneficial. These should generally be used only under the guidance and care of a holistic medicine physician.

Pharmaceutical replacements only address a single hormone without consideration for the balance needed to maintain optimal health. When your body produces testosterone naturally, it will balance the amount produced against other hormones present and required for your health and wellness.

This balance is ideal and reduces the potential that you'll experience significant side effects.

While there are several ways of boosting your testosterone levels, the production of the hormone is dependent on the presence of specific nutrients. Start with incorporating these foods into your nutritional plan.

1. Pomegranate

This beautiful red fruit has been used medicinally for centuries. With high levels of antioxidants, vitamins A, C, E and iron, researchers have found one glass of pomegranate juice a day can increase testosterone levels between 16 percent and 30 percent improve mood, and increase libido.

Blood pressure fell and positive emotions rose as well among those consuming pomegranate juice.8,9 While many of the research studies have looked into pomegranate juice, I strongly suggest consuming the fruit in its whole form instead.

Not only will this give you added fiber (which is found in the edible seeds), but it will ensure that you're not overdoing it on fructose, which is found in high levels in all types of fruit juice. That being said, even the whole fruit is high in sugar and should be eaten only in moderation.

2. Olive Oil

Extra virgin olive oil carries a powerful punch in your quest to increase testosterone. In research, participants who consumed olive oil daily experienced an increase in testosterone levels between 17 percent and 19 percent over a three-week period.10

3. Oysters

Long hailed as a libido-boosting food, these little morsels are high in zinc. You may naturally experience a boost in your testosterone, your libido and your sperm count as a result.

Other foods packed with zinc include sardines, anchovies, cashews and wild-caught salmon. Rawpumpkin seeds are another good source but should be limited to one tablespoon a day.

4. Coconut

Your body requires healthy saturated fats to produce most hormones, testosterone included.

Coconut will help your body's ability to produce cholesterol, necessary for optimal health, help reduce body fat and maintain your weight. Weight control is another natural way of improving your testosterone production.

5. Cruciferous Vegetables

Broccoli and cauliflower may help a man's body excrete excess estrogen and increase the amount of testosterone available to cells. Indole-3-carbinol, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, may increase the excretion of estradiol (one estrogen hormone) in some men by up to 50 percent, thus increasing the amount of testosterone available.11,12

6. Whey Protein

Whether found in quality whey protein powder or in ricotta cheese, this protein may help restrict your body's production of cortisol and thus increase the effect of the testosterone you are already producing. Whey protein may also help boost testosterone production.

In research from Finland, scientists gave participants 15 grams of whey isolate both before and after resistance exercises. Muscle biopsy showed an increase in testosterone production of up to 25 percent, which was maintained for 48 hours.13

The authors theorized that a greater expression of testosterone in skeletal muscle could allow for greater uptake from the blood. Although important to the production of testosterone, too much protein can have the opposite effect.

A meat-free diet may lower your testosterone production by up to 14 percent, but that doesn't mean you should eat excessive quantities of animal protein, either. Excessive protein intake may contribute to the development of chronic diseases like cancer and even accelerate aging.

Consider reducing your protein levels 1 gram of protein for every kilogram of lean body mass, or one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass.

7. Garlic

While this fragrant herb doesn't contain the necessary nutrients to produce testosterone, it does contain allicin, a compound that lowers the levels of cortisol in your body. With your cortisol levels lowered, your body can more effectively and efficiently use the testosterone that is produced.14

Both men and women benefit from adequate production of testosterone. Although known as the "male hormone," women use testosterone to maintain lean muscle mass, feelings of well-being, sex drive and sexual pleasure.15 Leydig cells in the testicles in men and the ovaries and adrenal glands in women are responsible for the production and secretion of testosterone. Symptoms of low levels of testosterone in men and women include:16

Low energy

Fatigue

Higher blood pressure

Decreased strength

Decreased work capacity of muscles

Low sexual desire

Lack of sexual responsiveness

Weaker orgasm

Loss of lean body mass and increase in fat stores

Increased cardiovascular risk

Begin with your nutrition intake to ensure your body has the building blocks to produce testosterone. But, don't stop there! You can increase production and balance your hormonal levels using these five strategies.

1. Weight Loss

Shedding extra pounds may naturally increase your testosterone levels. In a study published in Endocrine, researchers found that weight loss reduced the prevalence of low testosterone levels in middle-aged, overweight men with prediabetes by at least 50 percent.17

2. Exercise

Some studies have demonstrated that testosterone levels are elevated for up to 15 minutes afterexercise and other studies demonstrated this increase for up to an hour.18 The differentiating factors were age, type of exercise, fitness level, weight, and time of day when you exercise.

However, high-intensity exercise combined with intermittent fasting has the greatest potential to increase both your human growth hormone and testosterone levels over longer periods of time.19,20,21

3. Optimize Your Zinc and Vitamin D

These are the nutrient precursors needed to produce testosterone. You may find that you are deficient in these nutrients, as are many people. Zinc deficiency is a global concern and vitamin D deficiency is common in people of all ages.

Based on the evaluation of healthy populations that get plenty of natural sun exposure, the optimal range of vitamin D for general health appears to be somewhere between 50 and 70 ng/ml.

4. Reduce Your Stress Levels

When your body is stressed, your adrenal glands secrete cortisol. In a fight or flight situation, this can save your life. However, under chronic conditions cortisol can reduce the effectiveness of the testosterone your body produces.

Look for stress-reducing techniques that work for you. Yoga, the Emotional Freedom Techniques, exercise, adequate amounts of sleep and relaxation techniques can all help to reduce your stress levels.

5. Reduce Sugar and Carbohydrate Intake

Eating transiently lowers testosterone, but sugar and carbohydrates do the most damage by leading to surges in blood sugar and raising insulin levels. Past research has demonstrated that high levels of insulin reduce blood levels of testosterone.

When men consumed a glucose (sugar) solution as part of a glucose tolerance test, the amount of circulating testosterone in their blood was reduced by as much as 25 percent. Even two hours later, their testosterone levels remained much lower than before the test.22

Originally posted here:

7 Testosterone-Boosting Foods - Mercola.com


Jul 8

Merkel’s Patient Diplomacy Is Tested by Trump and Putin’s ‘Axis of Testosterone’ – Wall Street Journal (subscription)


Wall Street Journal (subscription)
Merkel's Patient Diplomacy Is Tested by Trump and Putin's 'Axis of Testosterone'
Wall Street Journal (subscription)
HAMBURG, GermanyThe U.S. president has accused her of ruining Germany. The Turkish president says she harbors terrorists. The Russian president, her spy agencies warn, may be about to interfere in her re-election campaign. In the coming days, ...

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Merkel's Patient Diplomacy Is Tested by Trump and Putin's 'Axis of Testosterone' - Wall Street Journal (subscription)


Jul 8

Trump and Putin Meet in Testosterone-Fueled Face-Off – New York Times

For his part, Mr. Putin called the dissolution of the Soviet Union the 20th centurys worst catastrophe. His appeal to a Russian public hungering to restore its rightful superpower status has withstood economic privations caused by sanctions imposed after Russia invaded Ukraine.

William Taubman, an expert in Soviet history, said that Mr. Putin tapped into a long Russian preoccupation with being perceived as strong. When they get drunk, Russians will often say, You respect me, dont you? said Professor Taubman, the author of Khrushchev: The Man and His Era and a forthcoming book about Mikhail Gorbachev.

Meetings between world leaders have often been seen through the lens of masculinity (witness Lyndon B. Johnsons oft-quoted remark after the American bombing of Vietnam: I didnt just screw Ho Chi Minh. I cut his pecker off.) That holds particularly true for encounters between Russian and American leaders.

During their kitchen debate in Moscow in 1959, Richard M. Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev stood in an American model kitchen and shook their fingers in each others faces during a fiery exchange about capitalism and communism. Nixon, then vice president, wanted to avoid looking weak as he prepared to run for president; Khrushchev was posturing for both Soviet and American audiences.

Before John F. Kennedys first meeting with Khrushchev in Vienna in 1961, President Charles DeGaulle warned him: Your job, Mr. President, is to make sure Khrushchev believes you are a man who will fight, Professor Taubman recounted in his book. But Kennedy was rattled by their encounter; Khrushchev dismissed him as such a weakling that he went on to miscalculate Kennedys resolve in the Cuban missile crisis.

The Geneva summit in 1985 between Ronald Reagan and Gorbachev may be the encounter with the most parallels to the meeting between Mr. Putin and Mr. Trump, Professor Taubman believes, because the two were geopolitical foes who built a personal rapport that helped end the Cold War.

That, of course, is what some of Mr. Trumps aides appear to fear that the self-proclaimed master dealmaker may actually make a deal that intensifies the suspicions surrounding his circles encounters with Russia. Reagans defenders would hasten to add that dtente with the Soviet Union came only after Reagan talked and acted tough. And in Poland on Thursday, Mr. Trump criticized Mr. Putin in the strongest term hes used to date, although he again declined to state unequivocally that he believed Russia was solely responsible for meddling in the 2016 election.

Even with the long history of swagger, this Russian-American meeting stands out. Its as old as American politics and yet it feels new in this iteration, said Michael Kimmel, a professor of sociology and gender at Stony Brook University and the author of Angry White Men.

Everything is a manhood test. Even CNN has to be wrestled into the ground in a fake match, not a real one. To me, thats the metaphor, the WWE. Its two hyper-idealized versions of masculinity getting into the ring. Everyone loves the over-the-topness of the pretense, because everyone knows no one can get hurt. In this case, someone could get hurt.

So Mr. Trump has set himself up with little room to maneuver. Hes built his brand, and much of his foreign policy, on masculine strength. He lost the handshake contest to Emmanuel Macron of France. And hes walking into a meeting with a country seen by much of the world as an aggressor who has already scored points against the United States with its interference in a domestic election.

The cost of any perceived weakness could be high for both combatants and the projection of masculinity they hold so dear.

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Trump and Putin Meet in Testosterone-Fueled Face-Off - New York Times


Jul 8

Testosterone treatment reserved for men with symptoms | To Your … – STLtoday.com

Dear Dr. Roach I am a 70-year-old male. I receive testosterone injections (in the butt) from my provider every three weeks, and have been receiving these injections for roughly five years. My provider reviews my bloodwork every six months before he writes a prescription renewal for testosterone, which I then take to his office for safekeeping and the regular injections. My latest bloodwork indicates that my testosterone serum is low at 310, and free testosterone is low at 4.9. After five years of injections, I continue to have low T; it does not seem to be improving. At my most recent visit, the doctor increased the injection dosage from 2 ml to 3 ml. I am concerned because of the heart, prostate and other risk factors I read about. Any advice or cause for concern? M.M.

Answer Testosterone treatment is indicated for men with symptoms of low testosterone levels and confirmed by blood testing. It is not a tonic to be used without due consideration.

There has long been concern about adverse effects of testosterone, especially to the prostate and to the heart. Most prostate cancer is testosterone-sensitive, and removing testosterone was one of the oldest treatments for prostate cancer. However, restoring normal levels of testosterone in a man with low levels is now considered to have low potential for increasing prostate cancer. It has not been definitively proven to be safe, but the many studies that have been done have been reassuring. Authorities recommend more-aggressive prostate cancer screening for men on testosterone treatment.

Athletes using extremely high doses of testosterone (many times greater than the doses you are taking) are at risk for heart attack and stroke. However, these data cannot be used to consider the risk in men who are prescribed testosterone with a low level, where the goal is to get to normal. Testosterone treatment reduces several key risk factors, including cholesterol. Most of the well-done studies show little if any risk from testosterone treatment; some have shown some benefit.

Since the dose you were getting wasnt bringing your blood level up, I think increasing it is appropriate. The usual goal is a blood level of 500-600, but that may not be appropriate for everybody.

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.

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Testosterone treatment reserved for men with symptoms | To Your ... - STLtoday.com


Jul 8

Column: Testosterone treatment reserved for men with symptoms … – Prescott Daily Courier

By Dr. Keith Roach, Syndicated Columnist

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am a 70-year-old male. I receive testosterone injections (in the butt) from my provider every three weeks, and have been receiving these injections for roughly five years. My provider reviews my bloodwork every six months before he writes a prescription renewal for testosterone, which I then take to his office for safekeeping and the regular injections. My latest bloodwork indicates that my testosterone serum is low at 310, and free testosterone is low at 4.9. After five years of injections, I continue to have low T; it does not seem to be improving. At my most recent visit, the doctor increased the injection dosage from 2 ml to 3 ml. I am concerned because of the heart, prostate and other risk factors I read about. Any advice or cause for concern? M.M.

ANSWER: Testosterone treatment is indicated for men with symptoms of low testosterone levels and confirmed by blood testing. It is not a tonic to be used without due consideration.

There has long been concern about adverse effects of testosterone, especially to the prostate and to the heart. Most prostate cancer is testosterone-sensitive, and removing testosterone was one of the oldest treatments for prostate cancer. However, restoring normal levels of testosterone in a man with low levels is now considered to have low potential for increasing prostate cancer. It has not been definitively proven to be safe, but the many studies that have been done have been reassuring. Authorities recommend more-aggressive prostate cancer screening for men on testosterone treatment.

Athletes using extremely high doses of testosterone (many times greater than the doses you are taking) are at risk for heart attack and stroke. However, these data cannot be used to consider the risk in men who are prescribed testosterone with a low level, where the goal is to get to normal. Testosterone treatment reduces several key risk factors, including cholesterol. Most of the well-done studies show little if any risk from testosterone treatment; some have shown some benefit.

Since the dose you were getting wasnt bringing your blood level up, I think increasing it is appropriate. The usual goal is a blood level of 500-600, but that may not be appropriate for everybody.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am perplexed about use of estrogen ointment. My doctor has prescribed Premarin ointment to be used vaginally for relief of painful intercourse. It is effective, but I am very concerned about side effects. She has assured me that the amount that is used (twice a week) is minimal and does not put users at risk for the side effects of oral estrogen tablets. I do have family history of blood clots and uterine cancer, and I suffer from aura migraines. I am 65 years old and in good general health. I never considered the use of hormones for menopausal symptoms, and although I am using the ointment at present, I still am very hesitant. A.M.H.

ANSWER: Because estrogen is poorly absorbed when used topically, the concerns about side effects are greatly reduced. Estrogen blood levels are very nearly the same in women on vaginal estrogen compared with women who do not use estrogen at all. While I would never prescribe vaginal estrogen to a woman with a history of breast cancer without discussing it with her oncologist, I think that the systemic risks of estrogen are very small with the vaginal preparations.

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Column: Testosterone treatment reserved for men with symptoms ... - Prescott Daily Courier


Jul 4

Testosterone – WebMD

Test Overview

A testosterone test checks the level of this male hormone (androgen) in the blood. Testosterone affects sexual features and development. In men, it is made in large amounts by the testicles . In both men and women, testosterone is made in small amounts by the adrenal glands , and in women, by the ovaries .

The pituitary gland controls the level of testosterone in the body. When the testosterone level is low, the pituitary gland releases a hormone called luteinizing hormone (LH). This hormone tells the testicles to make more testosterone.

Before puberty, the testosterone level in boys is normally low. Testosterone increases during puberty. This causes boys to develop a deeper voice, get bigger muscles, make sperm , and get facial and body hair. The level of testosterone is the highest around age 40, then gradually becomes less in older men.

In women, the ovaries account for half of the testosterone in the body. Women have a much smaller amount of testosterone in their bodies compared to men. But testosterone plays an important role throughout the body in both men and women. It affects the brain, bone and muscle mass, fat distribution, the vascular system, energy levels, genital tissues, and sexual functioning.

Most of the testosterone in the blood is bound to a protein called sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Testosterone that is not bound ("free" testosterone) may be checked if a man or a woman is having sexual problems. Free testosterone also may be tested for a person who has a condition that can change SHBG levels, such as hyperthyroidism or some types of kidney diseases.

Total testosterone levels vary throughout the day. They are usually highest in the morning and lowest in the evening.

A testosterone test is done to:

You do not need to do anything before you have this test. Your doctor may want you to do a morning blood test because testosterone levels are highest between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m.

The health professional taking a sample of blood will:

The blood sample is taken from a vein in your arm. An elastic band is wrapped around your upper arm. It may feel tight. You may feel nothing at all from the needle, or you may feel a quick sting or pinch.

There is very little chance of a problem from having a blood sample taken from a vein.

A testosterone test checks the level of this male hormone (androgen) in the blood.

The normal values listed here-called a reference range-are just a guide. These ranges vary from lab to lab, and your lab may have a different range for what's normal. Your lab report should contain the range your lab uses. Also, your doctor will evaluate your results based on your health and other factors. This means that a value that falls outside the normal values listed here may still be normal for you or your lab.

Your doctor will have your test results in a few days.

Men

270-1070 ng/dL (9-38 nmol/L)

Women

15-70 ng/dL (0.52-2.4 nmol/L)

Children (depends on sex and age at puberty)

2-20 ng/dL or 0.07-0.7 nmol/L

The testosterone level for a postmenopausal woman is about half the normal level for a healthy, nonpregnant woman. And a pregnant woman will have 3 to 4 times the amount of testosterone compared to a healthy, nonpregnant woman.

Men

50-210 pg/mL (174-729 pmol/L)

Women

Reasons you may not be able to have the test or why the results may not be helpful include:

To learn more, see:

Fischbach FT, Dunning MB III, eds. (2009). Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests, 8th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Chernecky CC, Berger BJ (2008). Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures, 5th ed. St. Louis: Saunders.

Fischbach FT, Dunning MB III, eds. (2009). Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests, 8th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Pagana KD, Pagana TJ (2010). Mosbys Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier.

ByHealthwise Staff Primary Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine Specialist Medical ReviewerAlan C. Dalkin, MD - Endocrinology

Current as ofNovember 20, 2015

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

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Testosterone - WebMD


Jul 4

Low Testosterone – WebMD: Symptoms, Health Effects, and …

In recent years, Spyros Mezitis, MD, PhD, has found himself talking to a lot more male patients about low testosterone, a diagnosis he says is becoming increasingly common.

"More men are getting older, and men are more open about talking about erectile dysfunction," Mezitis, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, tells WebMD.

On the one hand, increased diagnosis of low testosterone is driven by an aging population, less stigma, and more precise tests. But there's another big reason why men come to Mezitis' office for a testosterone test.

"Men are bombarded by media, by advertising campaigns -- 'Don't feel well? Ask your doctor about low testosterone,'" he says.

They come in saying they feel excessively fatigued, weaker, depressed, and that they have lost their sex drive -- all common symptoms of a drop in testosterone.

"As an endocrinologist, I'm thinking hormones," says Mezitis, who estimates that about a quarter to a third of the men he tests for low testosterone have levels below normal. "Sometimes it is testosterone, sometimes it is the thyroid, and sometimes it's something unrelated to hormones."

Testosterone is a hormone. It's what puts hair on a man's chest. It's the force behind his sex drive.

During puberty, testosterone helps build a man's muscles, deepens his voice, and boosts the size of his penis and testes. In adulthood, it keeps a man's muscles and bones strong and maintains his interest in sex. In short, it's what makes a man a man (at least physically).

After age 30, most men begin to experience a gradual decline in testosterone. A decrease in sex drive sometimes accompanies the drop in testosterone, leading many men to mistakenly believe that their loss of interest in sex is simply due to getting older.

"Some say it's just a part of aging, but that's a misconception," says Jason Hedges, MD, PhD, a urologist at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. A gradual decline in testosterone can't explain a near-total lack of interest in sex, for example. And for Hedges' patients who are in their 20s, 30s, and early 40s and having erectile problems, other health problems may be a bigger issue than aging.

"A lot of the symptoms are mirrored by other medical problems," Hedges says. "And for a long time, we were not attributing them to low testosterone, but to diabetes, depression, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease. But awareness and appreciation of low testosterone has risen. We recognize now that low testosterone may be at the root of problems."

Doctors will want to rule out any such possible explanations for symptoms before blaming them on low testosterone. They will also want to order a specific blood test to determine a man's testosterone level.

"The blood test is really the thing," Mezitis says.

The bottom of a man's normal total testosterone range is about 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). The upper limit is about 800ng/dL depending on the lab. A lower-than-normal score on a blood test can be caused by a number of conditions, including:

Some medicines and genetic conditions can also lower a man's testosterone score. Aging does contribute to low scores. In some cases, the cause is unknown.

A low score does not always translate to symptoms, Mezitis says, "but we often find something that's off when we see scores of 200 or 100 ng/dL."

Hedges agrees and warns that even if a man does not have symptoms, he may be well advised to seek treatment. Low testosterone scores often lead to drops in bone density, meaning that bones become more fragile and increasingly prone to breaks.

"That's something I would want to have a conversation about," Hedges says. "Bone density issues are not always apparent."

Having a gradual decline in your testosterone level as you age is to be expected. Treatment is sometimes considered if you're experiencing symptoms related to low testosterone.

If a young man's low testosterone is a problem for a couple trying to get pregnant, gonadotropin injections may be an option in some cases. These are hormones that signal the body to produce more testosterone. This may increase the sperm count. Hedges also describes implantable testosterone pellets, a relatively new form of treatment in which several pellets are placed under the skin of the buttocks, where they release testosterone over the course of about three to four months. Injections and nasal gels may be other options for some men.

"If their symptoms are truly due to low testosterone, patients tell me that within a few weeks they notice a significant difference, though sometimes it is not too dramatic," Hedges says. "Sex is better, depression is better -- you can see it directly and quickly."

There are also risks. Testosterone treatment can raise a man's red blood cell count as well as enlarge his breasts. It can also accelerate prostate growth. Men with breast cancer should not receive testosterone treatment.

Testosterone treatment usually is not advised for men with prostate cancer. Hedges says some of the associations between testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health are currently being challenged. In his practice, he does offer testosterone treatment to men who have been treated for prostate cancer.

"The take-home [message] is treatment is safe as long as you get careful monitoring," Hedges says. "If there are known issues, patients should be treated by a specialist."

SOURCES:

Spyros Mezitis, MD, PhD, endocrinologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York.

Jason Hedges, MD, PhD, urologist, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Ore.

The Hormone Foundation: "Low Testosterone and Men's Health."

The Hormone Foundation: "Patient Guide to Androgen Deficiency Syndromes in Adult Men."

Patient Education Institute: "Low Testosterone Reference Summary."

Read the rest here:

Low Testosterone - WebMD: Symptoms, Health Effects, and ...


Jul 4

What is Testosterone? – Live Science: The Most Interesting …

The chemical structure of testosterone.

Testosterone is a male sex hormone that is important for sexual and reproductive development. The National Institutes of Health regards testosterone as the most important male hormone. Women also produce testosterone, but at lower levels than men.

Testosterone belongs to a class of male hormones called androgens, which are sometimes called steroids or anabolic steroids. In men, testosterone is produced mainly in the testes, with a small amount made in the adrenal glands. The brain's hypothalamus and pituitary gland control testosterone production. The hypothalamus instructs the pituitary gland on how much testosterone to produce, and the pituitary gland passes the message on to the testes. These communications happen through chemicals and hormones in the bloodstream.

Testosterone is involved in the development of male sex organs before birth, and the development of secondary sex characteristics at puberty, such as voice deepening, increased penis and testes size, and growth of facial and body hair.

The hormone also plays a role in sex drive, sperm production, fat distribution, red cell production, and maintenance of muscle strength and mass, according to the Mayo Clinic. For these reasons, testosterone is associated with overall health and well-being in men. One 2008 study published in the journal Frontiers of Hormone Research even linked testosterone to the prevention of osteoporosis in men.

In women, the ovaries and adrenal glands produce testosterone. Women's total testosterone levels are about a tenth to a twentieth of men's levels.

Levels of testosterone naturally decrease with age, but exactly what level constitutes "low T," or hypogonadism, is controversial, Harvard Medical School said. Testosterone levels vary wildly, and can even differ depending on the time of day they're measured (levels tend to be lower in the evenings). The National Institutes of Health includes the following as possible symptoms of low testosterone:

It is important to note, however, that conditions other than low T can cause erectile dysfunction, such as diseases in the nerves or blood.

Doctors typically to treat men for hypogonadism if they have symptoms of low testosterone and their testosterone levels are below 300 nanograms per deciliter.

High testosterone levels can cause problems in women, including irregular menstrual cycles, increases in body hair and acne, and a deepening of the voice. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome have high levels of male hormones, including testosterone, which can be a cause of infertility.

For people who are worried about low or high testosterone, a doctor may perform a blood test to measure the amount of the hormone in the patient's blood. When doctors find low-T, they may prescribe testosterone therapy, in which the patient takes an artificial version of the hormone. This is available in the following forms: a gel to be applied to the upper arms, shoulders or abdomen daily; a skin patch put on the body or scrotum twice a day; a solution applied to the armpit; injections every two or three weeks; a patch put on the gums twice a day; or implants that last four to six months.

Men using testosterone gels must take precautions, such as washing hands and covering areas where the gel is applied, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Women and children should not touch the gel or the skin where the gel or patch is applied.

In older men with true testosterone deficiencies, testosterone treatment has been shown to increase strength and sex drive, experts say. But sometimes, symptoms of erectile dysfunction are due to other conditions, including diabetes and depression, according to the Mayo Clinic. Treating these men with testosterone hormone won't improve symptoms.

There are a lot of other claims about what testosterone therapy can do, but are also still being tested. For instance, it was thought that maybe it would help with age-related memory loss. A 2017 placebo-controlled study published in JAMA, found that in the 788 older men tested, testosterone treatment did not help with age-related memory loss.

It may also become a treatment for anemia, bone density and strength problems. In a 2017 study published in the journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), testosterone treatments corrected anemia in older men with low testosterone levels better than a placebo. Another 2017 study published in JAMA found that older men with low testosterone had increased bone strength and density after treatment when compared with a placebo.

The safety of testosterone treatment is still being researched. It has several possible side effects and some possible long-term effects, as well.

For example, testosterone treatment lowers sperm count, so Michael A. Werner, a specialist in andropause, or "male menopause," recommends that men who desire future fertility avoid testosterone treatments.

Other side effects include increased risk of heart problems in older men with poor mobility, according to a 2009 study at Boston Medical Center. A 2017 study published in JAMA found that treatments increase coronary artery plaque volume. Additionally, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires manufactures to include a notice on the labeling that states taking testosterone treatments can lead to possible increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. The FDA recommends that patients using testosterone should seek medical attention right away if they have these symptoms:

The treatment can also increase the risk of sleep apnea, promote prostate and breast growth, and even encourage the development of prostate cancer, according to the Mayo Clinic.

This article is for informational purposes only and is not meant to offer medical advice.

Additional reporting by Jessie Szalay and Alina Bradford, Live Science contributors.

Additional resources

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