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Sep 23

Long-Term Weight Loss Success May Rely On Consistency …

Theres no one-size-fits-all weight loss plan, but taking on a consistent strategy to dropping pounds that can be repeated, rather than a quick approach as with crash diets, may be the key to slimming down for good.

In a new study conducted at Drexel University, psychologists investigatedwhy some people have success with weight loss programs, but others dont.

It seems that developing stable, repeatable behaviors related to food intake and weight loss early on in a weight control program is really important for maintaining changes over the long term, lead author Emily Feig, who conducted the researchas a doctoral student at Drexel, said in a statement.

The study, published in the journal Obesity, involved 183 overweight or obese adults, a majority of whom were white females living in the Philadelphia area. The researchers enrolled all of the adults into one of three different year-longweight loss programsinvolving behavioral treatment, such as setting goals for increasing physical activity and monitoring their calorie intake. One group was instructed to use two meal replacements each day during the first sixmonths and another group was told to eat less energy-dense foods while having more protein and fiber.

Each week, the participants weights were recorded. Additionally, they self-reported their attitudes and behaviors regarding cravings, emotional eating, and binge eating.

Feig and her colleagues found that those who had consistent weight loss in the first six weeks were more likely to keep off the unwanted pounds in the long-term compared to those whose weights varied each week.

This study goes even further in supporting the importance of early weight changes by showing that weekly variability in weight, above and beyond how much weight is lost, predicts weight loss maintenance up to two years later, Feig told CNN. So it seems that both success and consistency in weight loss at the beginning of a program is important for long-term success.

The findings add to priorstudies showing that the amount of weight a person loses early on in a weight loss program can predict how much they lose down the road, Feig pointed out.

The research also revealed in a twist that participants who reported lessemotional eating andbinging, and who wereless preoccupied with food at the beginning of the study, were more likely to have greater weight fluctuations and less weight loss overall. So success isn't predicated on someone's relationship to food so much as the early habits the dieter establishes in the beginning, the statement notes.

The study cant confirm why some peoples weights widely fluctuate during weight loss programs, but the researchers plan to further explore the topic. Still, principal investigator Michael Lowesays the findings highlight a possible strategy for maintaining weight loss.

Settle on a weight loss plan that you can maintain week in and week out, even if that means consistently losing of a pound each week, Lowe, a psychology professor at Drexel, said in thestatement.

The bottom line: Losing weight consistently, even if it's not a lot, may be more effective then attempting to achieve long-term success from a risky crash diet.

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Long-Term Weight Loss Success May Rely On Consistency ...


Sep 7

What’s the Deal With Vibrating Fitness Equipment, and Does It Really Work? – Greatist

One of the latest fitness trends may shake up your routineliterally. Fitness companies are now incorporating vibration technology into their products, adding a buzzy twist to exercise equipment that targets and benefits the entire body (think: vibrating platforms that are big enough for you to stand on), as well as accessories that take a more localized approach (next-level foam rollers such as TriggerPoints GRID Vibe and Hyperices VYPER 2, which vibrate as you roll out) and even vibrating workout pants.

But with some pretty big claims out there ("Its as effective as cardio! Itll make you stronger!"), its hard to know how much of that is legit or just hype.

Developed by a Dutch Olympic trainer, the Power Plateone of the most well-known whole-body vibration (WBV) devicesis an effective way to turbocharge the exercises you already do. Chances are you've seen one of these in your gym but have no idea what it does or how to use it. Heres how it works: You perform free weight or bodyweight exercises while standing on a platform that vibrates 25 to 50 times per second, which triggers a reflexive response in the muscles, making them recruit more fibers to complete each action. So your muscles work harder in order to keep your body upright, explains Allison Lind Wiedman, doctor of physical therapy and sports specialist.

And while Wiedman suggests it may not fulfill your cardio component (in the same way training for a marathon might), you can perform cardio exercises (like toe taps or quick feet) on it for an added challenge. Plus, she adds, "you can strengthen in a very efficient way and work on your balance. Theres also evidence itll help improve muscle endurance and mobility.

WBV may also help muscles recover faster: Its been shown to cut back on delayed-onset muscle sorenessyep, were talking DOMSand improve range of motion, and scientists recently discovered it decreases lactate levels and increases heart rate recovery levels post-exercise. Effect of vibration treatment on symptoms associated with eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Lau WY, Nosaka K. American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation, 2011, Nov.;90(8):1537-7385. Effect of whole body vibration on lactate level recovery and heart rate recovery in rest after intense exercise. Kang SR, Min JY, Yu C. Technology and health care : official journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine, 2017, Aug.;25(S1):1878-7401. To explain their findings, the researchers speculate the vibrations may boost the flow of oxygen, which might help flush the lactic acid that builds up after a tough workout.

More good news: WBV, together with cutting back on calories, may help with long-term weight loss and lead to a decrease in visceral fat, according to a study published in the journal Obesity Facts. Effect of long-term whole body vibration training on visceral adipose tissue: a preliminary report. Vissers D, Verrijken A, Mertens I. Obesity facts, 2010, Apr.;3(2):1662-4025. And WBV plus resistance exercise may equal more lean tissue. Whole-body vibration augments resistance training effects on body composition in postmenopausal women. Fjeldstad C, Palmer IJ, Bemben MG. Maturitas, 2009, Apr.;63(1):1873-4111. An important thing to note here is this technology seems to work best when used in tandem with other typical weight- and fat-loss techniquesmeaning its probably not going to make fat fly off your frame all by itself, but when paired with other healthy habits, it can make a difference.

One of the most surprising WBV studies suggests the technology might be as effective as exercise when it comes to losing weight and improving metabolism. (But before you ditch the gym, know this was a study performed on mice, and the scientists were quick to point out more research is needed to know whether the same results would occur in humans.)

Image: Hyperice As for localized vibration used in tools like foam rollers, its hard to say whether it would generate the same benefits as WBV, since the bulk of research focuses on the kind that targets the entire body, not one specific area. One exception? In one study (partially funded by Hyperice) out of UNC Chapel Hill, range of motion improved more in people who rolled out with a vibrating foam roller versus one without vibration, which is promising news for sure, but we'd also say more research still needs to be done.

Other than that, these tools could offer a fun and challenging update to your usual workout. Take a cue from the WBV platforms and try performing strength exercises (like some of these, for example) with a vibrating foam roller. The vibration will force you to engage extra stabilizing muscles to kick your routine up a notch.

Another class of vibrating fitness products takes the technology to a creative new level; unlike the Power Plate or vibrating foam rollers, Nadi Xs vibrating yoga pants arent designed to bring on any of the benefits above but to boost your yoga practice itself by using the vibrations to gently nudge you into moving your body into better, more correct alignment while in a pose. Imagine: a buzz along your leg as a reminder to externally rotate or root down during your practice.

While vibrating yoga pants offer a cool, innovative use of the technology, they come with a pretty hefty price tag ($199), and whether they'll actually improve your practice or not is questionable and might depend on personal preference. Our tester, a certified yoga instructor, felt like it'd be better to use your money on a few extra yoga classes to master each pose instead.

Though there isnt a ton of research behind them, isolated vibration tools may be worth a shot to boost your recovery efforts (we've tested them, and anecdotal evidence suggests the vibrations deepen the pressure from the foam roller without increasing pain. Think of how that vibrating massage chair at your nail salon feels good while sometimes a deep-tissue massage feels painful). And with plenty of research to back it up, whole-body vibration gets the green light from both science and experts like Wiedman alike.

Original post:
What's the Deal With Vibrating Fitness Equipment, and Does It Really Work? - Greatist


Sep 7

Dr. Nishant Rao Stresses the Importance of Moderate Weight Loss in the Fight Against Hypertension – Markets Insider

Jackson, MS, Sept. 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) --

Jackson, MS - Nearly 85 million U.S. citizens have hypertension (high blood pressure). A normal blood pressure reading is 120 over 80, but high blood pressure (as a result of diet, lifestyle choices and stress) is higher than 140 over 90. Left untreated, hypertension can lead to cardiovascular problems. Dr. Nishant Rao, medical director at Diet Doc medical weight loss has lead his team to search for safe ways to effectively treat hypertension. Millions of Americans use Atenolol for hypertension, a medication that works well and has minimal side effects. He continued, The supply of this medication has suddenly decreased, leading many to try different medications with more side effects, or implement lifestyle changes to decrease the need and dependency for the medications.

The good news, is that numerous clinical trials have shown that as little as a 5-10 percent reduction in body weight can dramatically improve metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes and hypertension. Many people dont realize how little weight loss it takes to make a dramatic improvement in hypertension and then have the ability to use less drug intervention. Patients faced with the atenolol shortage can use this crossroads to lose fat efficiency, rapidly and directly improve outcomes for chronic disease. Diet Doc has created medically supervised programs which are free from all stimulants that cause hypertension, such as the commonly prescribed phentermine and other weight loss pills which are central nervous system stimulants. For an average patient weighing 180 lbs., this equates to a 9-18 lbs. weight loss to improve long term health outcomes, says Dr. Rao. This can be accomplished with rapid, medically supervised weight loss programs without the use of any stimulants. Diet Doc offers such programs via convenient, telemedicine-based doctor consultations and home shipments of safe weight loss medications that suppress appetite, control unhealthy eating habits and promote fast fat burning and regulate blood pressure levels.

With a team of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and motivational coaches, Diet Doc products help individuals lose weight fast and keep it off. Patients can get started immediately, with materials shipped directly to their home or office. They can also maintain weight loss in the long-term through weekly consultations, customized diet plans, motivational coaches and a powerful prescription program. With Diet Doc, the doctor is only a short phone call away and a fully dedicated team of qualified professionals is available 6 days per week to answer questions, address concerns and support patients.

Getting started with Diet Doc is very simple and affordable. New patients can easily visit https://www.dietdoc.com to quickly complete a health questionnaire and schedule an immediate, free online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation's leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

LinkedIn: https://www.LinkedIn.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

CONTACT INFORMATION

Diet Doc Contact Information:

Providing care across the USA

Headquarters:

San Diego, CA

800-311-5610

Info@DietDoc.com

Homepage

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5417d4a6-d417-420a-9968-c800dabbbae2

Here is the original post:
Dr. Nishant Rao Stresses the Importance of Moderate Weight Loss in the Fight Against Hypertension - Markets Insider


Sep 7

ASU fitness expert says new study underscores tricky nature of weight loss – Arizona State University

September 6, 2017

The more you exercise, the more those pounds should just melt off, right?

Not always this according to a recent exercise study out of the United Kingdom.

Conducted by scientists from Loughborough University in Britain, the study concludes that exercise as a weight-loss strategy is tricky, complex and not as relational as one might think.

To provide a deeper understanding of the nature of weight loss, ASU Now turned to Glenn A. Gaesser, an Arizona State University professor of exercise and health promotion in the College of Health Solutions.

Glenn A. Gaesser

Question: A recently published by the Journal of Endocrinology shows that exercise isnt always a foolproof weight-loss strategy in large part because exercise makes you hungrier and many people wind up consuming more calories than they normally would. What is your philosophy?

Answer: This was a short-term study, only looking at a few hours after exercise. The real issue is what happens long-term. Most studies show that weight loss from exercise training of any type is far less than what is expected on the basis of the cumulative calories burned during all exercise sessions combined.

This is because the human body tends to defend its set-point weight, much the same way a thermostat is designed to maintain a set temperature. This involves a number of physiological and hormonal responses that essentially prevent chronic exercise from reducing body weight to unhealthy levels. The same is true when people diet.

Adaptive thermogenesis prevents most people from losing weight and/or maintaining weight loss. Set-point is an individual thing, determined largely by genes but also environment. It also tends to increase with age.

Q: How do different types of exercise affect appetite?

A: This is a tough one. Higher-intensity exercise (think sprint-type interval exercise) typically suppresses appetite at least initially. But the real issue is, as I mentioned earlier, what happens in the long term? Eventually, hunger comes back and we eat. That is why virtually every study that has been published on exercise training and weight loss shows minimal effects.

Q: Are there any good non-exercise habits or methods that blunt appetite?

A: Good luck with that one. Trying to blunt appetite is essentially trying to battle biology, and biology inevitably wins. For individuals trying to lose some weight via exercise, I would suggest assessing progress fairly frequently with the scale and making adjustments accordingly.

We also published an article in the New York Times a couple of years ago showing that weight loss early on during an exercise program was also a significant predictor of weight (and fat) loss at the end of the exercise program.

Q: Ive heard that chocolate milk is the best thing to have after a workout. True or false?

A: Chocolate milk is fine I love it. Its got carbs and protein, but not necessarily the best. The overall 24-hour dietary intake is far more important than what you eat right after a workout.

Top photo courtesy of Pixabay

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ASU fitness expert says new study underscores tricky nature of weight loss - Arizona State University


Sep 6

MARLAY — Why you should rethink use of artificial sweeteners – Lakenewsonline.com

With the average soda containing around 150 calories, it might seem that replacing those sugar calories with a zero-calorie artificial sweetener would promote weight loss. But several studies show that this just doesnt happen. Why?

If you think switching to drinks and foods sweetened with zero- or low-calorie sugar substitutes will help you lose weight, think again.

Thats the message from a study published in the July 2017 Journal of Canadian Medical Association. The researchers found that using artificial sweeteners did not result in weight loss. In fact, the study found that compared to people who do not routinely use artificial sweeteners, those who do gained more weight, had a larger waistline and higher incidence of hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The 2008 San Antonio Heart Study found that people who drank 21 or more artificially sweetened beverages a week were twice as likely to be either overweight or obese as those who drank one or less per week.

The use of artificial sweeteners is more widespread than ever. There are six no-calorie artificial sweeteners currently approved for use by the FDA. All of these are approved for safety when used in moderation. They include acesulfame potassium (Sweet One), aspartame (Equal), saccharin (Sweet N Low), sucralose (Splenda), neotame and advantame.

Additionally, stevia and monk fruit extract have been given GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status. Sugar alcohols, such as xylitol and sorbitol, are low-calorie sweeteners.

Since 1999, there has been a 200-percent increase in Americans use of artificial sweeteners. According to the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 25 percent of children and more than 40 percent of adults consume artificial sweeteners on a daily basis.

With the average soda containing around 150 calories, it might seem that replacing those sugar calories with a zero-calorie artificial sweetener would promote weight loss. But several studies show that this just doesnt happen. Why? Following are some theories.

We may replace those calories with other sweets. I had a diet soda with lunch, so I can have dessert.

Artificial sweeteners may change how we taste foods. These sweeteners are several-hundred-times sweeter than sugar. This may over-stimulate our sugar receptors. As a result, naturally sweet foods, such as fruit, might taste less sweet to us and foods that are not sweet, such as vegetables, might taste bitter and unpalatable.

Artificial sweeteners may prevent the body from associating sweetness with calories, which might cause us to crave more sweets.

Artificial sweeteners may alter our gut bacteria leading to glucose intolerance a risk factor for diabetes and obesity.

Artificial sweeteners are some of the most studied ingredients in our food supply. The American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association both approve the use of artificial sweeteners in place of sugar to combat obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee assessed the use of low-calorie sweeteners and found that replacing sugar with artificial sweeteners could reduce calories in the short-term but may not be effective for long-term weight loss.

The concern I have is that even if you avoid artificially sweetened beverages, you probably consume these sweeteners more than you know. Kids, especially, are at risk with their smaller bodies and the overabundance of artificial sweeteners in many commonly consumed foods. Most flavored waters and more than a third of yogurts contain artificial sweeteners. Many products marketed as light or no sugar added contain artificial sweeteners. Following are examples of products that contain artificial sweeteners.

Whole grain breads and English muffins containing a combination of sugar and sucralose

Pedialyte, which uses sucralose and acesulfame potassium

Microwave kettle corn sweetened with sucralose

Hot cocoa mixes with a mixture of sugar, corn syrup and sucralose

Reduced-sugar ketchup with sucralose

No-added-sugar fruit cups containing monk fruit extract

Flavored waters sweetened with sucralose

Natural low-calorie sweeteners, such as stevia, monk fruit extract and sorbitol, may or may not be better. They are relatively new and few studies have assessed them.

No one knows the long-term effect of consuming large amounts of multiple artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. Using artificial sweeteners as an excuse to keep eating sweet foods is not the answer to a healthy diet. With no clear evidence showing a benefit to using artificial sweeteners, I cant help but wonder if the potential for harm is worth a few saved calories.

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MARLAY -- Why you should rethink use of artificial sweeteners - Lakenewsonline.com


Sep 6

Dual studies suggest high-fat, low-carb diet improves memory and lifespan – New Atlas

Are carbs the new fat? For much of the second half of the 20th century, doctors constantly suggested we avoid high-fat foods, but more recently a new target for our dietary scorn has emerged: carbohydrates. Two new companion studies are suggesting a ketogenic diet high fat, low protein, and low carbohydrates could enhance memory, improve physical strength and extend lifespan.

Whether you want to call it the Atkin's Diet, Paleo or simply "Keto," there have been plenty of variations on this way of eating. While some diets suggest no carbohydrates or sugars, many are underwritten by the same theory. The idea is that by severely restricting the body's intake of carbohydrates, a state known as ketosis is entered into. This forces the body to burn stored fats as fuel instead of carbohydrates.

A ketogenic diet certainly does result in weight loss, at least in the short term, but the long-term health effects of this kind of eating have long been cause for controversy among scientists.

A recent large-scale observational study published in The Lancet concluded that a high-carb diet was more dangerous to a person's health than a high-fat diet. The results made headlines around the world, but not all scientists were convinced. Criticisms of the study included a lack of clarity in regards to what types of carbohydrates were being recorded (processed sugars versus whole grains, for example) and a noting of the extreme levels of carbohydrate intake that the study used to constitute a "high-carb diet."

These two new companion studies have examined the long-term effects of a ketogenic diet on mice. The results are certainly fascinating, albeit nothing close to definitive.

Over at the University of California, Davis, the mice were split up into three groups: a high-carb diet, a low-carb/high-fat diet, and a ketogenic diet. The researchers made sure the calorie count of each diet was exactly the same in order to focus just on the metabolic effects.

"We expected some differences, but I was impressed by the magnitude we observed a 13 percent increase in median life span for the mice on a high-fat versus high-carb diet," says senior author Jon Ramsey. "In humans, that would be seven to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life."

The mice on the ketogenic diet also displayed increased motor function and a reduced incidence of tumors.

The second study, conducted by the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in California, was constructed with a similar three-group design. This study found no extension to overall lifespan in the ketogenic-fed mice, but they did display a lower risk of dying between the ages of one and two years old.

The most interesting effects seen in the Buck study came in the cognitive tests. The mice fed a ketogenic diet displayed no age-related decline on memory tests, performing just as well in old age as they did in middle age. The ketogenic mice also displayed more exploratory behavior than the other diet groups.

"We were careful to have all of the mice eating a normal diet during the actual memory testing which suggests the effects of the ketogenic diet were lasting," says lead scientist on the study, John Newman. "Something changed in the brains of these mice to make them more resilient to the effects of age."

While the team at the Buck Institute is cautious to note that these results shouldn't necessarily be mirrored in humans, the UC Davis researchers more explicitly suggest their results can be.

"In this case, many of the things we're looking at aren't much different from humans," says Ramsay of the UC, Davis research. "This study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake. It also opens a new avenue for possible dietary interventions that have an impact on aging."

Undoubtedly, this recent wave of pro-low-carb and ketogenic diet research will spur a new interest in the dietary phenomenon, but the long-term health effects in humans are still not clear.

A healthy human diet involves more than simple generalizations. Does this high-fat/low-carb plan address salt intake? Is anyone removing carbs from their diet still getting the necessary nutrients they would otherwise get from more complex carbohydrates like whole grains?

Eric Verdin, President of the Buck Institute, suggests the best outcomes from this research are the new therapies that can be developed. Understanding how ketones interact with our cognitive faculties for example, will help target new opportunities for anti-aging therapies. The Buck Institute is also currently looking at how a ketogenic diet affects mice with Alzheimer's disease.

In the meantime, Verdin suggests we think about exercising more if we are excited by this ketogenic research. "Exercise also creates ketone bodies that may be one of the mechanisms why it shows such protective effects on brain function and on healthspan and lifespan," he says.

The Buck Institute study was published in the journal Cell Metabolism, while the UC, Davis study was published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

The rest is here:
Dual studies suggest high-fat, low-carb diet improves memory and lifespan - New Atlas


Sep 5

Ditching these five foods could be the key to long-term weight loss … – Now To Love

Stop dieting and start swapping!

By Holly Royce

We have some good news and some bad news.

Dr Nick Fuller is an obesity expert from Sydney, Australia - he wants us to stop obsessing over different diets (yes!) and make these five simple food swapsto help us lose weight and keep it off.

He reminds us that a quick fix is never the answer, in fact it will often mean you end up heavier than where you started.

Speaking to News.com.au, Nick said:

Everyone has a set point which is the weight that a body defends," he said.

"So when you lose weight, your body does all it can to return to that set point.

"This is about changing the bodys set point, not a quick fix that will have you heavier than where you started."

Seems reasonable - so what are these five magical foods we should be ditching to help us with sustainable, long-term weight loss ?

1. Swap coconut oil for olive oil

It's not the first time we've heard that coconut oil is out.

While it make work wonders for your skin and hair when it comes to what we eat, the Mediterraneans know best.

2. Swap white bread for wholegrain bread

Again, this one isn't terrible shocking. White bread has little nutritional value whereas whole grains can reduce our risk of heart disease and types of cancers.

3. Swap cheese for skimmed milk

Say it ain't so!

There is a lot of conflicting information around this one, but Dr Nick told News.com.au, "Like its trendy friend coconut oil, cheeses consumption is sure to see your weight increase and will also block your arteries."

"The focus of dairy foods should be on regular consumption of skim or low fat milk and yoghurt."

4. Swap the alcohol for water

Again, we can see the logic here but it doesn't make us feel any better.

Dr Nick acknowledges there are some health benefits to drinking, but recommends sticking to two standard drinks per day.

The best choice though, is always water.

Sigh.

5. Swap dried fruit for fresh fruit

Did you know dried fruit contains five times the amount of calories as fresh fruit?

Forget the dried apple and blueberries and go get yourself the real deal instead.

5 extra easy swaps you can make today:

Switch butter for olive oil (when frying)Season with herbs instead of saltSwap red meat for fish (twice a week)Snack on nuts instead of chipsChoose whole-wheat pita instead of bread (for sandwiches)

Original post:
Ditching these five foods could be the key to long-term weight loss ... - Now To Love


Sep 5

Dr. Nishant Rao Stresses the Importance of Moderate Weight Loss in the Fight Against Hypertension – GlobeNewswire (press release)

Jackson, MS, Sept. 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) --

Jackson, MS - Nearly 85 million U.S. citizens have hypertension (high blood pressure). A normal blood pressure reading is 120 over 80, but high blood pressure (as a result of diet, lifestyle choices and stress) is higher than 140 over 90. Left untreated, hypertension can lead to cardiovascular problems. Dr. Nishant Rao, medical director at Diet Doc medical weight loss has lead his team to search for safe ways to effectively treat hypertension. Millions of Americans use Atenolol for hypertension, a medication that works well and has minimal side effects. He continued, The supply of this medication has suddenly decreased, leading many to try different medications with more side effects, or implement lifestyle changes to decrease the need and dependency for the medications.

The good news, is that numerous clinical trials have shown that as little as a 5-10 percent reduction in body weight can dramatically improve metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes and hypertension. Many people dont realize how little weight loss it takes to make a dramatic improvement in hypertension and then have the ability to use less drug intervention. Patients faced with the atenolol shortage can use this crossroads to lose fat efficiency, rapidly and directly improve outcomes for chronic disease. Diet Doc has created medically supervised programs which are free from all stimulants that cause hypertension, such as the commonly prescribed phentermine and other weight loss pills which are central nervous system stimulants. For an average patient weighing 180 lbs., this equates to a 9-18 lbs. weight loss to improve long term health outcomes, says Dr. Rao. This can be accomplished with rapid, medically supervised weight loss programs without the use of any stimulants. Diet Doc offers such programs via convenient, telemedicine-based doctor consultations and home shipments of safe weight loss medications that suppress appetite, control unhealthy eating habits and promote fast fat burning and regulate blood pressure levels.

With a team of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and motivational coaches, Diet Doc products help individuals lose weight fast and keep it off. Patients can get started immediately, with materials shipped directly to their home or office. They can also maintain weight loss in the long-term through weekly consultations, customized diet plans, motivational coaches and a powerful prescription program. With Diet Doc, the doctor is only a short phone call away and a fully dedicated team of qualified professionals is available 6 days per week to answer questions, address concerns and support patients.

Getting started with Diet Doc is very simple and affordable. New patients can easily visit https://www.dietdoc.com to quickly complete a health questionnaire and schedule an immediate, free online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation's leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

LinkedIn: https://www.LinkedIn.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

CONTACT INFORMATION

Diet Doc Contact Information:

Providing care across the USA

Headquarters:

San Diego, CA

800-311-5610

Info@DietDoc.com

Homepage

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5417d4a6-d417-420a-9968-c800dabbbae2

Read more here:
Dr. Nishant Rao Stresses the Importance of Moderate Weight Loss in the Fight Against Hypertension - GlobeNewswire (press release)


Sep 3

Consistent weight loss is better for long-term success, suggests new study – Jakarta Post

New research in the United States has found that when it comes to losing weight, shedding the pounds steadily and consistently is the best way to keep them off long-term.

Carried out by researchers from Drexel University, the study attempted to find out what makes some people more successful in a weight loss program than others, and how these factors could help improve the success of treatments in the future.

The team recruited 183 overweight or obese participants and placed them on a year-long weight loss program.

During the program, participants were given meal replacements and behavioral goals such as self-monitoring, calorie monitoring and increasing physical activity. Participants also attended weekly group meetings to be weighed and had a final weigh-in two years after the start of the program.

Participants were also asked to report on food-related behaviors and attitudes such as food cravings, emotional eating, binge eating and their confidence in regulating their food intake.

The results showed that participants whose weight fluctuated the most over the first six and 12 weeks of the weight loss program had poorer long-term weight control at 12 and 24 months into the program.

Read also: How being married can protect your heart

For example, someone who lost four pounds one week, regained two pounds the next week, and then lost one pound the week after had poorer weight loss outcomes than someone who lost one pound consistently each week for three weeks.

It seems that developing stable, repeatable behaviors related to food intake and weight loss early on in a weight control program is really important for maintaining changes over the long term, said lead author Emily Feig, PhD.

Perhaps surprisingly, the team also found that participants who reported lower emotional eating, less binge eating and less worrying about food had more weight fluctuations and less weight loss overall, suggesting that it is the pattern of initial weight loss rather than relationships with or behaviors toward food that is more important in predicting weight loss success and maintenance long term.

However, the team are keen to further explore why some people show more weight fluctuations than others.

For now, principal investigator Michael Lowe, PhD, says the findings do suggest a potential method for achieving weight loss goals, advising those looking to lose weight to, Settle on a weight loss plan that you can maintain week in and week out, even if that means consistently losing three-fourths of a pound each week.

The results can be found published online in the journal Obesity.

Continue reading here:
Consistent weight loss is better for long-term success, suggests new study - Jakarta Post


Sep 3

Fresh and Fit: 4 new research articles you should read – Nooga.com

Its important to keep abreast of new health research. (Photo: Liz Weston, StockSnap)

Its hard to keep pace with the news these days. It can be difficult to find time to read up on the latest sports or health news. The best way to stay informed is to have someone make it easier on you. With that in mind, I thought Id share some recent articles and research I find interesting.

Less sittingA study by Finnish researchers set out to find if office workers who lived sedentary lifestyles could change their habits with counseling and assistance. In total, 133 office workers were studied for one year. They were separated into two groups, with one group serving as the control group, meaning they didnt receive treatment by the researchers. The second group was given tailored counseling sessions in order to discuss strategies to reduce sitting at work and leisure time.

Initially, the second group was able to decrease their leisure time by 21 minutes per day, and their active time and breaks in sedentary time increased. After a full year, this same group was down to eight fewer minutes sedentary leisure time, but the control group increased their own time slightly.

The cholesterol and cardiovascular disease biomarkers for the intervention group improved, and the leg muscle mass of this group was maintained. At the same time, the control groups muscle mass decreased by half a percent.

Those changes might not seem like a lot, but over time, these differences can add up. I think of it the same way I think of weight gain. On average, people gain 1 to 2 pounds a year from early adulthood to middle age. Its the sort of thing that sneaks up on us, and we dont realize how much has changed until the change itself seems massive.

So, although this research is preliminary, its worth noting if for no other reason than as a reminder we should work to maintain our muscle mass. I, for one, would like to still be walking around in my old age.

Unusual treatments for depressionAnyone suffering from depression should go to their primary care doctor and explain their symptoms and feelings to them. That should always be the first option, because he or she can then refer you to a specialist (if needed) to help deal with the problems youre facing. (Anytime I discuss improving depression symptoms, my suggestions are always a supplement to what your doctor prescribes.)

With that said, a recent article in U.S. News discussing unusual treatments for depression caught my attention. The author, David Levine, does a good job of explaining some techniques you may not have heard about, putting them into a context of claims versus actual results. Context with these options goes a long way. The treatments include cuddling, transcranial magnetic stimulation, bouldering, probiotics, ketamine, hallucinogens and lithium.

Thankfully, the drugs and medical procedures involved arent going to happen without your doctors approval, as there can be severe side effects related to their use. Most of these methods probably wont be the secret cure you may be searching for, so its important to always be cautious before trying anything new.

The best way to improve your depression symptoms remains a combination of better diet, consistent exercise and following your doctors advice.

Consistency key for weight lossIf youre looking to lose weight, you should first focus on getting your mind right and not ignoring the mental aspect of this process. However, a new study reminds us of what we may already know, even if we dont want to believe it.

The study was published in the journal Obesity, and its conclusion is that the key to achieving your weight loss goals is consistency. Since we usually gain about 1 or 2 pounds a year, its a bit silly that when we try to lose weight, we hope to lose that same amount about once a week, isnt it? Nobody likes to wait for the results we want, yet crash and fad diets almost never work.

Researchers followed 183 overweight or obese adults who participated in a weight loss program that provided counseling on their diet and exercise. Their weight was tracked and measured every week.

What they found was that the participants whose weight fluctuated the earliest in the program had the hardest time maintaining their weight by the end of the year. Essentially, the people who lost the most weight the fastest set themselves up for failure because they tried to do too much all at once.

The quick, early weight loss they experienced set them up for failure in the long term. The participants whose weight fluctuated less in the beginning were more likely to control their weight and lose more weight over the long term.

Moderate consumption of fats, carbohydratesThisnew studytries to get at the heart of what a good diet really looks like.

The research involved more than 135,000 people across five continents, and while the results may not surprise you too much, such a large study needs to be paid attention to. Essentially, the best diet includes a moderate intake of fat, fruits and vegetables, and involves avoiding too many carbohydrates.

As I continue to stress, moderation remains the key. Not all fats are bad, and fruits and vegetables are an important part of any proper diet. However, a high consumption of carbohydrates and added sugar (more than 60 percent of your diet) is dangerous and linked to a higher risk of early death.

Jay McKenzie loves soccer, history and feeling great. Hes on a quest to eat better and exercise more, and he wants to share his experiences along the way. You can email him at[emailprotected]with comments or questions. The opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, notNooga.comor its employees.

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Fresh and Fit: 4 new research articles you should read - Nooga.com



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