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Sep 5

Ditching these five foods could be the key to long-term weight loss … – Now To Love

Stop dieting and start swapping!

By Holly Royce

We have some good news and some bad news.

Dr Nick Fuller is an obesity expert from Sydney, Australia – he wants us to stop obsessing over different diets (yes!) and make these five simple food swapsto help us lose weight and keep it off.

He reminds us that a quick fix is never the answer, in fact it will often mean you end up heavier than where you started.

Speaking to News.com.au, Nick said:

Everyone has a set point which is the weight that a body defends,” he said.

“So when you lose weight, your body does all it can to return to that set point.

“This is about changing the bodys set point, not a quick fix that will have you heavier than where you started.”

Seems reasonable – so what are these five magical foods we should be ditching to help us with sustainable, long-term weight loss ?

1. Swap coconut oil for olive oil

It’s not the first time we’ve heard that coconut oil is out.

While it make work wonders for your skin and hair when it comes to what we eat, the Mediterraneans know best.

2. Swap white bread for wholegrain bread

Again, this one isn’t terrible shocking. White bread has little nutritional value whereas whole grains can reduce our risk of heart disease and types of cancers.

3. Swap cheese for skimmed milk

Say it ain’t so!

There is a lot of conflicting information around this one, but Dr Nick told News.com.au, “Like its trendy friend coconut oil, cheeses consumption is sure to see your weight increase and will also block your arteries.”

“The focus of dairy foods should be on regular consumption of skim or low fat milk and yoghurt.”

4. Swap the alcohol for water

Again, we can see the logic here but it doesn’t make us feel any better.

Dr Nick acknowledges there are some health benefits to drinking, but recommends sticking to two standard drinks per day.

The best choice though, is always water.

Sigh.

5. Swap dried fruit for fresh fruit

Did you know dried fruit contains five times the amount of calories as fresh fruit?

Forget the dried apple and blueberries and go get yourself the real deal instead.

5 extra easy swaps you can make today:

Switch butter for olive oil (when frying)Season with herbs instead of saltSwap red meat for fish (twice a week)Snack on nuts instead of chipsChoose whole-wheat pita instead of bread (for sandwiches)

Original post:
Ditching these five foods could be the key to long-term weight loss … – Now To Love


Sep 5

Dr. Nishant Rao Stresses the Importance of Moderate Weight Loss in the Fight Against Hypertension – GlobeNewswire (press release)

Jackson, MS, Sept. 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

Jackson, MS – Nearly 85 million U.S. citizens have hypertension (high blood pressure). A normal blood pressure reading is 120 over 80, but high blood pressure (as a result of diet, lifestyle choices and stress) is higher than 140 over 90. Left untreated, hypertension can lead to cardiovascular problems. Dr. Nishant Rao, medical director at Diet Doc medical weight loss has lead his team to search for safe ways to effectively treat hypertension. Millions of Americans use Atenolol for hypertension, a medication that works well and has minimal side effects. He continued, The supply of this medication has suddenly decreased, leading many to try different medications with more side effects, or implement lifestyle changes to decrease the need and dependency for the medications.

The good news, is that numerous clinical trials have shown that as little as a 5-10 percent reduction in body weight can dramatically improve metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes and hypertension. Many people dont realize how little weight loss it takes to make a dramatic improvement in hypertension and then have the ability to use less drug intervention. Patients faced with the atenolol shortage can use this crossroads to lose fat efficiency, rapidly and directly improve outcomes for chronic disease. Diet Doc has created medically supervised programs which are free from all stimulants that cause hypertension, such as the commonly prescribed phentermine and other weight loss pills which are central nervous system stimulants. For an average patient weighing 180 lbs., this equates to a 9-18 lbs. weight loss to improve long term health outcomes, says Dr. Rao. This can be accomplished with rapid, medically supervised weight loss programs without the use of any stimulants. Diet Doc offers such programs via convenient, telemedicine-based doctor consultations and home shipments of safe weight loss medications that suppress appetite, control unhealthy eating habits and promote fast fat burning and regulate blood pressure levels.

With a team of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and motivational coaches, Diet Doc products help individuals lose weight fast and keep it off. Patients can get started immediately, with materials shipped directly to their home or office. They can also maintain weight loss in the long-term through weekly consultations, customized diet plans, motivational coaches and a powerful prescription program. With Diet Doc, the doctor is only a short phone call away and a fully dedicated team of qualified professionals is available 6 days per week to answer questions, address concerns and support patients.

Getting started with Diet Doc is very simple and affordable. New patients can easily visit https://www.dietdoc.com to quickly complete a health questionnaire and schedule an immediate, free online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

LinkedIn: https://www.LinkedIn.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

CONTACT INFORMATION

Diet Doc Contact Information:

Providing care across the USA

Headquarters:

San Diego, CA

800-311-5610

Info@DietDoc.com

Homepage

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5417d4a6-d417-420a-9968-c800dabbbae2

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Dr. Nishant Rao Stresses the Importance of Moderate Weight Loss in the Fight Against Hypertension – GlobeNewswire (press release)


Sep 3

Consistent weight loss is better for long-term success, suggests new study – Jakarta Post

New research in the United States has found that when it comes to losing weight, shedding the pounds steadily and consistently is the best way to keep them off long-term.

Carried out by researchers from Drexel University, the study attempted to find out what makes some people more successful in a weight loss program than others, and how these factors could help improve the success of treatments in the future.

The team recruited 183 overweight or obese participants and placed them on a year-long weight loss program.

During the program, participants were given meal replacements and behavioral goals such as self-monitoring, calorie monitoring and increasing physical activity. Participants also attended weekly group meetings to be weighed and had a final weigh-in two years after the start of the program.

Participants were also asked to report on food-related behaviors and attitudes such as food cravings, emotional eating, binge eating and their confidence in regulating their food intake.

The results showed that participants whose weight fluctuated the most over the first six and 12 weeks of the weight loss program had poorer long-term weight control at 12 and 24 months into the program.

Read also: How being married can protect your heart

For example, someone who lost four pounds one week, regained two pounds the next week, and then lost one pound the week after had poorer weight loss outcomes than someone who lost one pound consistently each week for three weeks.

It seems that developing stable, repeatable behaviors related to food intake and weight loss early on in a weight control program is really important for maintaining changes over the long term, said lead author Emily Feig, PhD.

Perhaps surprisingly, the team also found that participants who reported lower emotional eating, less binge eating and less worrying about food had more weight fluctuations and less weight loss overall, suggesting that it is the pattern of initial weight loss rather than relationships with or behaviors toward food that is more important in predicting weight loss success and maintenance long term.

However, the team are keen to further explore why some people show more weight fluctuations than others.

For now, principal investigator Michael Lowe, PhD, says the findings do suggest a potential method for achieving weight loss goals, advising those looking to lose weight to, Settle on a weight loss plan that you can maintain week in and week out, even if that means consistently losing three-fourths of a pound each week.

The results can be found published online in the journal Obesity.

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Consistent weight loss is better for long-term success, suggests new study – Jakarta Post


Sep 3

Fresh and Fit: 4 new research articles you should read – Nooga.com

Its important to keep abreast of new health research. (Photo: Liz Weston, StockSnap)

Its hard to keep pace with the news these days. It can be difficult to find time to read up on the latest sports or health news. The best way to stay informed is to have someone make it easier on you. With that in mind, I thought Id share some recent articles and research I find interesting.

Less sittingA study by Finnish researchers set out to find if office workers who lived sedentary lifestyles could change their habits with counseling and assistance. In total, 133 office workers were studied for one year. They were separated into two groups, with one group serving as the control group, meaning they didnt receive treatment by the researchers. The second group was given tailored counseling sessions in order to discuss strategies to reduce sitting at work and leisure time.

Initially, the second group was able to decrease their leisure time by 21 minutes per day, and their active time and breaks in sedentary time increased. After a full year, this same group was down to eight fewer minutes sedentary leisure time, but the control group increased their own time slightly.

The cholesterol and cardiovascular disease biomarkers for the intervention group improved, and the leg muscle mass of this group was maintained. At the same time, the control groups muscle mass decreased by half a percent.

Those changes might not seem like a lot, but over time, these differences can add up. I think of it the same way I think of weight gain. On average, people gain 1 to 2 pounds a year from early adulthood to middle age. Its the sort of thing that sneaks up on us, and we dont realize how much has changed until the change itself seems massive.

So, although this research is preliminary, its worth noting if for no other reason than as a reminder we should work to maintain our muscle mass. I, for one, would like to still be walking around in my old age.

Unusual treatments for depressionAnyone suffering from depression should go to their primary care doctor and explain their symptoms and feelings to them. That should always be the first option, because he or she can then refer you to a specialist (if needed) to help deal with the problems youre facing. (Anytime I discuss improving depression symptoms, my suggestions are always a supplement to what your doctor prescribes.)

With that said, a recent article in U.S. News discussing unusual treatments for depression caught my attention. The author, David Levine, does a good job of explaining some techniques you may not have heard about, putting them into a context of claims versus actual results. Context with these options goes a long way. The treatments include cuddling, transcranial magnetic stimulation, bouldering, probiotics, ketamine, hallucinogens and lithium.

Thankfully, the drugs and medical procedures involved arent going to happen without your doctors approval, as there can be severe side effects related to their use. Most of these methods probably wont be the secret cure you may be searching for, so its important to always be cautious before trying anything new.

The best way to improve your depression symptoms remains a combination of better diet, consistent exercise and following your doctors advice.

Consistency key for weight lossIf youre looking to lose weight, you should first focus on getting your mind right and not ignoring the mental aspect of this process. However, a new study reminds us of what we may already know, even if we dont want to believe it.

The study was published in the journal Obesity, and its conclusion is that the key to achieving your weight loss goals is consistency. Since we usually gain about 1 or 2 pounds a year, its a bit silly that when we try to lose weight, we hope to lose that same amount about once a week, isnt it? Nobody likes to wait for the results we want, yet crash and fad diets almost never work.

Researchers followed 183 overweight or obese adults who participated in a weight loss program that provided counseling on their diet and exercise. Their weight was tracked and measured every week.

What they found was that the participants whose weight fluctuated the earliest in the program had the hardest time maintaining their weight by the end of the year. Essentially, the people who lost the most weight the fastest set themselves up for failure because they tried to do too much all at once.

The quick, early weight loss they experienced set them up for failure in the long term. The participants whose weight fluctuated less in the beginning were more likely to control their weight and lose more weight over the long term.

Moderate consumption of fats, carbohydratesThisnew studytries to get at the heart of what a good diet really looks like.

The research involved more than 135,000 people across five continents, and while the results may not surprise you too much, such a large study needs to be paid attention to. Essentially, the best diet includes a moderate intake of fat, fruits and vegetables, and involves avoiding too many carbohydrates.

As I continue to stress, moderation remains the key. Not all fats are bad, and fruits and vegetables are an important part of any proper diet. However, a high consumption of carbohydrates and added sugar (more than 60 percent of your diet) is dangerous and linked to a higher risk of early death.

Jay McKenzie loves soccer, history and feeling great. Hes on a quest to eat better and exercise more, and he wants to share his experiences along the way. You can email him at[emailprotected]with comments or questions. The opinions expressed in this column belong solely to the author, notNooga.comor its employees.

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Fresh and Fit: 4 new research articles you should read – Nooga.com


Sep 2

Consistent weight loss is better for long-term success, suggests new … – Inquirer.net

Image: Tsuji/Istock.com via AFP Relaxnews

New research in the United States has found that when it comes to losing weight, shedding the pounds steadily and consistently is the best way to keep them off long-term.

Carried out by researchers from Drexel University, the study attempted to find out what makes some people more successful in a weight loss program than others, and how these factors could help improve the success of treatments in the future.

The team recruited 183 overweight or obese participants and placed them on a year-long weight loss program.

During the program, participants were given meal replacements and behavioral goals such as self-monitoring, calorie monitoring and increasing physical activity. Participants also attended weekly group meetings to be weighed and had a final weigh-in two years after the start of the program.

Participants were also asked to report on food-related behaviors and attitudes such as food cravings, emotional eating, binge eating and their confidence in regulating their food intake.

The results showed that participants whose weight fluctuated the most over the first six and 12 weeks of the weight loss program had poorer long-term weight control at 12 and 24 months into the program.

For example, someone who lost four pounds one week, regained two pounds the next week, and then lost one pound the week after had poorer weight loss outcomes than someone who lost one pound consistently each week for three weeks.

It seems that developing stable, repeatable behaviors related to food intake and weight loss early on in a weight control program is really important for maintaining changes over the long term, said lead author Emily Feig, PhD.

Perhaps surprisingly, the team also found that participants who reported lower emotional eating, less binge eating and less worrying about food had more weight fluctuations and less weight loss overall, suggesting that it is the pattern of initial weight loss rather than relationships with or behaviors toward food that is more important in predicting weight loss success and maintenance long term.

However, the team are keen to further explore why some people show more weight fluctuations than others.

For now, principal investigator Michael Lowe, PhD, says the findings do suggest a potential method for achieving weight loss goals, advising those looking to lose weight to, Settle on a weight loss plan that you can maintain week in and week out, even if that means consistently losing three-fourths of a pound each week.

The results can be found published online in the journal Obesity. JB

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Consistent weight loss is better for long-term success, suggests new … – Inquirer.net


Sep 2

Pediatricians Sound Alarm on Rapid Weight Changes in Young Athletes – Bloomington Pantagraph

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Young gymnasts, figure skaters and wrestlers who try to quickly shed pounds by fasting or restricting fluids may be endangering their health, pediatricians warn.

Similarly, young football players or power-lifters who try to rapidly pack on muscle may also be undermining their health, a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said.

“Sometimes, children and teens in certain sports believe they need to achieve a particular body type to be successful,” report author Dr. Rebecca Carl said in an AAP news release.

“Unless they have a healthy strategy to work toward their goals, however, they can end up defeating themselves and causing health problems,” Carl added.

AAP experts point out that rapid weight loss by means of fasting or avoidance of fluids can actually lead to a loss of muscle strength, speed and stamina. Quick weight loss can also impair thinking, reaction time, alertness and the ability to problem-solve.

Young divers, runners, boxers and rowers are other athletes who may attempt to lose weight quickly.

The rapid loss of pounds may also lead to depression, mood swings, and even long-term eating disorders, the AAP team cautioned.

And health issues related to dehydration may not be quickly reversed, the experts warned. Rehydration typically requires up to 48 hours of regular fluid intake.

By the same token, fast weight gain increases the risk for obesity-related health problems, the doctors added, while also undermining overall stamina and athletic performance.

The upshot: weight gain and weight loss should be achieved gradually and over the long term by focusing on a carefully balanced diet paired with consistent exercise, the AAP team advised.

The report appears in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics.

There’s more information on nutrition for young athletes at EatRight.org.

Original post:
Pediatricians Sound Alarm on Rapid Weight Changes in Young Athletes – Bloomington Pantagraph


Sep 2

Steady May Win Weight-Loss Race – Newsmax

Dieters who lose varying amounts of weight each week may not shed as many excess pounds as people who consistently lose the same amount week in and week out, a U.S. study suggests.

Researchers examined data on183 overweight and obese adults who participated in a weight loss program with meal replacements provided along with goals for calorie monitoring and exercise.

After two years, the dieters who had the most consistent weight loss during the first three months of the program shed more excess pounds than the people who initially had more fluctuation, researchers report in the journal Obesity.

While the study cant explain whether or how consistency in weekly weight loss might contribute to success, its possible that different approaches to dieting played a role, said study co-author Michael Lowe, a psychology researcher at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

Those who lose weight steadily may have had more consistent eating and exercise habits before they joined our program and continued with that pattern as they cut back on calories and exercised more, Lowe said by email.

Those with more variable patters may be trying to lose weight as quickly as possible – so they sometimes have big weight losses, but this leaves them starving and unable to stay on their diet for a week or so, Lowe added. They regain some of their weight, get upset, and try to lose as much as they can again.

At the start of the study, participants were 51 years old on average and typically obese. The majority were white, and most were women.

Overall, participants weekly weight loss tended to vary by about 1.09 pounds during the first six weeks and by 1.33 pounds during the first 12 weeks of the study.

Women tended to be more consistent dieters than men, with less variation from one week to the next at both six weeks and 12 weeks.

The researchers found that higher weight variability during the initial six and 12 weeks of weight loss treatment predicted poorer subsequent, long-term weight control at one year and at two years.

For example, someone who lost four pounds one week, regained two and then lost one the next tended to fare worse than someone who lost one pound consistently each week for three weeks.

Interestingly, individuals who reported lower emotional eating, binge eating and preoccupation with food at the start of the study showed higher weight variability and less weight loss overall.

This suggests that initial weight change, rather than relationships with or behaviors toward food, is much more important in predicting who will succeed in weight loss and maintenance, the authors conclude.

Its also possible that variation in weight loss from one week to the next slows down overall weight loss, making it harder for people to achieve long-term weight loss goals, said Susan Roberts of the USDA Nutrition Center at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts.

So people who are on their program some weeks but not others will inevitably lose less weight because you cant really catch up in the sense of making up bad weeks, Roberts, who wasnt involved in the study, said by email. At best, you can only get back on track.

Participants who had more consistent results might also do more thorough job of tracking what they eat and how much they exercise, said Dr. Anne McTiernan of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

Perhaps the people with variability are having a harder time being careful about counting calories, watching what they eat, and staying active, McTiernan, who wasnt involved in the study, said by email. Slow and steady wins the race.

2017 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

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Steady May Win Weight-Loss Race – Newsmax


Sep 2

50 years of Weight Watchers of Arizona = 6.3 million pounds lost – AZ Big Media

Fifty years ago this month, Bob and Iris Machiz and their partners, Jerry and Isabelle Appell, boarded a plane with their five kids and flew from New York, where they were born and bred, to Phoenix to open the states first Weight Watchers franchise.

A teaser ad in the local paper announcing the arrival of the company that was founded three years earlier, in 1963, by Queens housewife Jean Nidetch, attracted 16 people to the first informational meeting in September 1967, six to the second, one to the third and no one to the fourth.

Although the low turnout did drive the partners to find a bit of solace at a local ice cream parlor, they were encouraged by the fact that all 16 people in the first meeting signed up to become members.

Based on digital records since 1986, Weight Watchers of Arizona has helped more than 620,000 men and women lose more than 6.3 million pounds.

Today, Weight Watchers has 225 employees in Arizona conducting more than 250 weekly meetings at 55 locations, including 11 Weight Watchers centers, plus workplace meetings for employees at 56 companies.

When I came down to scout the territory, all I saw were long stringy cowboys with bolo ties, Bob Machiz said. But we made a go of it and its been an incredible run. We offer our members hope, support and a way to meet their goals for a healthy lifestyle. When you can inspire hope and help people make healthy choices, you get so much back. Were looking forward to the next 50 years.

Weight Watchers of Arizona has planned a celebratory dinner in October and other anniversary-related specials.

Losing weight is just one long-term success factor of the Weight Watchers program, said Weight Watchers of Arizona General Manager Deborah Wright. Weight Watchers focuses on living life fully through healthy eating habits, better fitness and positive mindset, all based on personal goals.

That approach intrigued Oprah Winfrey enough to make a significant commitment as both a member and an investor. Its also what member Gina Gemma said has made a significant difference for her.

I never thought I would be able to lose weight while still enjoying the foods I previously did, but Weight Watchers absolutely proved me wrong, she said. Weight Watchers helped transform me not only physically but mentally as well and for that, I cannot put into words how appreciative I am for this wonderful program.

The regular meetings are organized and moderated by Weight Watchers Leaders who understand first-hand the challenges and rewards of the weight-loss and building-a-healthier-lifestyle process because they have been through it themselves with us, Wright said.

She explained that Weight Watchers helps members make healthy eating decisions, and encourages them to enjoy life by becoming more active. Weight management is a partnership that combines our knowledge with our members efforts to help make positive behavioral changes to lose weight, inspiring them with our belief in their power to succeed and motivating them every step of the way.

Weight Watchers offers a range of membership options including Pay As You Go, 20-week and monthly.

For more information about joining Weight Watchers or to bring Weight Watchers into the workplace, visit http://www.WeightWatchersAZ.com, email info@weightwatchersaz.com or by calling (602) 248-0303.

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50 years of Weight Watchers of Arizona = 6.3 million pounds lost – AZ Big Media


Sep 1

‘Slow but Steady’ Wins the Weight Loss Race – Healthline

A new study found that people whose weight fluctuates early in a weight loss program have worse long-term results.

If losing weight feels more like being a yo-yo than a ball rolling down a gentle hill, then you might want to rethink your approach.

A new study found that people whose weight fluctuated in the first few months of a weight loss program lost less weight over the long run, compared to people with more consistent week-by-week progress.

The Drexel University researchers suggested that this may help identify people early on who need extra support in meeting their weight loss goals.

The dangers of regaining weight thats been lost is nothing new to health professionals.

If youre yo-yoing, that is a clear signal or red flag that its about something more than the food you eat and the exercise youre engaging in, that there are probably ingrained patterns of behavior that we need to look at changing in order for it to stick long term, said Eliza Kingsford, a licensed psychotherapist and author of Brain-Powered Weight Loss, who wasnt involved in the study.

In the study, published August 28 in the journal Obesity, researchers followed 183 people participating in a year-long behavioral weight loss program.

Researchers found that people whose weight fluctuated more during the first 6 or 12 months lost less weight after one and two years.

For example, people who lost four pounds in one week, regained two the next, and then lost one the next and so on, did more poorly than people who lost one pound each week for the first six months.

While weight variability over the first six months predicted long-term success, researchers found that the 12-month variability was less affected by other factors.

All volunteers were given goals to focus on during the program, such as monitoring their habits, progress, and calorie intake, while also increasing their physical activity.

The first six months of the program focused on weight loss, with weekly small group sessions. The final six months shifted toward maintaining the weight, with less frequent sessions.

People who reported higher binge eating, emotional eating, and preoccupation with food at the beginning of the study showed higher weight variability and lost less weight after one or two years.

This suggests that weight variability is a better predictor of long-term success than a persons relationship with food.

The researchers pointed out that the study doesnt show that weight variability causes poorer weight loss outcomes. But it may help target people who arent benefitting from a particular weight loss program before theyve spent a year trying to lose weight.

Other research has also found that early success in a weight loss program predicts long-term results. But these studies looked at the percent change in weight loss rather than how much a persons weight jumps around week by week.

Although losing ten pounds in the first week can be a big boost of motivation for many people, it may not matter in the long run if your weight yo-yos the rest of the time.

A dramatic example of this comes from a 2016 Obesity study, in which researchers followed 14 people who participated in the Biggest Loser competition.

Over the course of the 30-week show, people lost on average 129 pounds each. But six years later, all but one had regained most of their weight on average, 90 pounds each.

Kingsford told Healthline that while doing things like severely restricting your calories or ditching carbs may give you dramatic upfront weight loss results, they dont make sense if you want lifelong success.

Research supports and will continue to support the types of behavior changes that are sustainable long term, said Kingsford. Of course, these dont lead to results that are nearly as sexy as losing 10 pounds in a week.

Sexy or not, sustainable is good if you want to keep the weight off.

One way to approach weight loss sustainably, said Kingsford, is by setting goals that you can actually achieve.

For example, if your approach to weight loss involves running, and youre currently running one mile, three times a week, the next step needs to be doable. That might mean running 2 miles on one or two of those days, not jumping straight to 10 miles, six times a week.

This approach also provides positive reinforcement for your goal-setting muscles.

The more you set and achieve goals, said Kingsford, the more you will be able to set and achieve goals.

Looking at your food triggers is another sustainable weight loss solution.

Do you eat when youre bored, stressed, or happy? Do you go out every Friday night with your coworkers out of habit? Do you automatically reach for a bag of pretzels when you sit down to watch your favorite television show?

Take a look at your current patterns of behavior around food and figure out what those triggers are, be it positive or negative triggers, said Kingsford. Then systematically look at changing those patterns of behavior based on the knowledge of the triggers.

This approach to weight loss isnt for everyone, though, especially with so many ads popping up online for sexy weight loss options.

But many people burn out from always trying the latest diet or the next cool workout.

People eventually come to me saying: Im tired of dieting, Im tired of yo-yoing, Im tired of being unsuccessful, said Kingsford. They get to the point of knowing this is about something more than just food and exercise.

See the article here:
‘Slow but Steady’ Wins the Weight Loss Race – Healthline


Sep 1

Consistency key to long-term weight loss: study – New York Daily News

Steady does it.

Thats the key to winning the battle of the bulge over time, according to a new study from Drexel University in Pennsylvania out Monday in the Obesity journal. So if youre in it for the long run when it comes to paring pounds, you should aim to shed the same amount of flab each week instead of for your weight to drastically drop, only to rise again.

Stable, repeatable behaviors related to food intake and weight loss early on in a weight control program is really important for maintaining changes over the long term, said lead author Emily Feig, Ph.D., who did the research at Drexel and is now a postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Researchers followed 183 overweight or obese adult subjects who were enrolled in a long-term weight-loss program. Participants attended weekly check-ins and reported their cravings, binges and weight-loss successes. They returned for a final weigh-ins and assessments at six, 12 and 24 months.

Eating too late at night will prevent weight loss

Consistency predicted long-range success, whereas variability proved counterproductive. In other words, subjects who shed one pound a week for three weeks fared better than a participant who dropped four pounds, then regained two and then dropped a pound.

Study subjects were mostly women. More research is needed to fully understand why some people achieve weight-loss goals and others dont. But the findings suggest that patience and making a habit of healthy, consistent eating helps you drop weight and keep it off.

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Consistency key to long-term weight loss: study – New York Daily News



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